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Chwan Hong Foo, Christina L Rootes, Karla Cowley, Glenn A Marsh, Cathryn M Gould, Celine Deffrasnes, Christopher J Cowled, Reuben Klein, Sarah J Riddell, Deborah Middleton, Kaylene J Simpson, Lin-Fa Wang, Andrew G D Bean, Cameron R Stewart
Hendra and Nipah viruses (family Paramyxoviridae, genus Henipavirus) are bat-borne viruses that cause fatal disease in humans and a range of other mammalian species. Gaining a deeper understanding of host pathways exploited by henipaviruses for infection may identify targets for new anti-viral therapies. Here we have performed genome-wide high-throughput agonist and antagonist screens at biosafety level 4 to identify host-encoded microRNAs (miRNAs) impacting henipavirus infection in human cells. Members of the miR-181 and miR-17~93 families strongly promoted Hendra virus infection...
October 2016: PLoS Pathogens
Kai Ma, Ruirui Xing, Ti-Feng Jiao, Guizhi Shen, Chengjun Chen, Junbai Li, Xuehai Yan
Self-assembling peptide-based materials are playing an important role in fabricating drug delivery carriers, however, they are often limited by several challenges, such as precise structure modulation, desirable nanoscale size and sufficient circulation lifetime in the body. To address this issue, herein one type of injectable dipeptide-based nanocarriers with well-modulated size and structure has been developed by adjusting glutaraldehyde (GA) assisted cationic dipeptide (CDP) assembly. After loading a model photosensitive drug (Ce6) and further decorating CDP nanoparticles (NPs) with heparin polymers (Hep), the desired dipeptide-based NPs are achieved with average diameter of 100 nm and surface charge of -25 mV, which are favorable for the enhanced permeability and retention effects...
October 25, 2016: ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
M L Kromrey, A Göhler, N Friedrich, K Kindermann, S Hadlich, D Puls, I Steinmetz, J P Kühn
To establish a routine workflow for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of mice infected with bacterial biosafety level 2 pathogens and to generate a mouse model for systemic infection with Staphylococcus aureus suitable for monitoring by MRI. A self-contained acrylic glass animal bed complying with biosafety level 2 requirements was constructed. After intravenous infection with 10(5) colony-forming units (CFU) (n = 3), 10(6) CFU (n = 11) or 10(7) CFU (n = 6) of S. aureus strain Newman, female Balb/c mice were whole-body scanned by 7T MRI...
October 24, 2016: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases
Tatsanee Phermthai, Kittima Tungprasertpol, Suphakde Julavijitphong, Puttachart Pokathikorn, Sasiprapa Thongbopit, Suparat Wichitwiengrat
Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) can effectively repair endometrial deficiencies, including infertile patients with a problem of inadequate endometrium thickness. Although, MSC derived from different organ sources have a similarity of MSC specific characteristics, endometrial stem cells (EMSC) are temporally regulated throughout the menstrual cycle in a micro-environmental niche found only in endometrial tissue. Given the micro-environment niche, developing treatments for endometrial disorders with EMSC should be a top priority...
October 21, 2016: Reproductive Biology
Ming Ma, Fei Yan, Minghua Yao, Zijun Wei, Dongliang Zhou, Heliang Yao, Hairong Zheng, Hangrong Chen, Jianlin Shi
Entirely differing from the common templating-based multistep strategy in fabricating multifunctional hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSNs), a facile and template-free synthetic strategy has been established in constructing a unique hollow/mesoporous organosilica nanocapsule concurrently encapsulating both isopentyl acetate (PEA) liquid and superparamagnetic iron oxides inside (denoted as PEA@OSNCs). This novel material exhibits ultrasmall and uniform particle size (~82 nm), high surface area (~534 m2 g-1) and excellent colloidal stability in aqueous solution...
October 24, 2016: ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
M T Cardoso, A O Pinheiro, A S Vidane, J B Casals, V C de Oliveira, Njn Gonçalves, D S Martins, C E Ambrósio
The biosafety of innovative procedures that utilize stem cells in regenerative medicine has been addressed in several studies. Previous work has showed no tumour formation following the use of feline and human amniotic membrane-derived stem cells (AMSCs). In contrast, tumour formation was observed when canine AMSCs were utilized. These findings suggested that feline and human, but not canine, AMSCs are suitable for cell transplantation trials. This study aimed to further evaluate the feasibility of utilizing canine AMSCs for transplantation purposes as well as for felines...
October 23, 2016: Reproduction in Domestic Animals, Zuchthygiene
Abdul K Parchur, Qifei Li, Anhong Zhou
We report the synthesis, characterization, and application of Prussian blue (PB) functionalized CaMoO4:Eu@SiO2@Au nanorod hybrid nanoparticles (HNPs), with multimodal capabilities such as fluorescence imaging, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) detection and photothermal therapy (PTT). The average size of CaMoO4:Eu@SiO2 NPs was 206 nm. The HNPs are highly dispersible in water for several weeks without settling and show a strong absorption in the near-infrared region, overlapping with the PB absorption between 600 nm and 1000 nm and the surface plasmon resonance of Au nanorods around 800 nm...
October 21, 2016: Biomaterials Science
Steven Mazur, Michael R Holbrook, Tracey Burdette, Nicole Joselyn, Jason Barr, Daniela Pusl, Laura Bollinger, Linda Coe, Peter B Jahrling, Matthew G Lackemeyer, Jiro Wada, Jens H Kuhn, Krisztina Janosko
Work in a biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) containment laboratory requires time and great attention to detail. The same work that is done in a BSL-2 laboratory with non-high-consequence pathogens will take significantly longer in a BSL-4 setting. This increased time requirement is due to a multitude of factors that are aimed at protecting the researcher from laboratory-acquired infections, the work environment from potential contamination and the local community from possible release of high-consequence pathogens...
October 3, 2016: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
Krisztina Janosko, Michael R Holbrook, Ricky Adams, Jason Barr, Laura Bollinger, Je T'aime Newton, Corrie Ntiforo, Linda Coe, Jiro Wada, Daniela Pusl, Peter B Jahrling, Jens H Kuhn, Matthew G Lackemeyer
Biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) suit laboratories are specifically designed to study high-consequence pathogens for which neither infection prophylaxes nor treatment options exist. The hallmarks of these laboratories are: custom-designed airtight doors, dedicated supply and exhaust airflow systems, a negative-pressure environment, and mandatory use of positive-pressure ("space") suits. The risk for laboratory specialists working with highly pathogenic agents is minimized through rigorous training and adherence to stringent safety protocols and standard operating procedures...
October 3, 2016: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
Russell Byrum, Lauren Keith, Christopher Bartos, Marisa St Claire, Matthew G Lackemeyer, Michael R Holbrook, Krisztina Janosko, Jason Barr, Daniela Pusl, Laura Bollinger, Jiro Wada, Linda Coe, Lisa E Hensley, Peter B Jahrling, Jens H Kuhn, Margaret R Lentz
Medical imaging using animal models for human diseases has been utilized for decades; however, until recently, medical imaging of diseases induced by high-consequence pathogens has not been possible. In 2014, the National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Integrated Research Facility at Fort Detrick opened an Animal Biosafety Level 4 (ABSL-4) facility to assess the clinical course and pathology of infectious diseases in experimentally infected animals. Multiple imaging modalities including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, and single photon emission computed tomography are available to researchers for these evaluations...
October 3, 2016: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
J Kyle Bohannon, Krisztina Janosko, Michael R Holbrook, Jason Barr, Daniela Pusl, Laura Bollinger, Linda Coe, Lisa E Hensley, Peter B Jahrling, Jiro Wada, Jens H Kuhn, Matthew G Lackemeyer
Aerosol or inhalational studies of high-consequence pathogens have recently been increasing in number due to the perceived threat of intentional aerosol releases or unexpected natural aerosol transmission. Specific laboratories designed to perform these experiments require tremendous engineering controls to provide a safe and secure working environment and constant systems maintenance to sustain functionality. Class III biosafety cabinets, also referred to as gloveboxes, are gas-tight enclosures with non-opening windows...
October 3, 2016: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
Antonella Conforti, Nadia Starc, Simone Biagini, Luigi Tomao, Angela Pitisci, Mattia Algeri, Pietro Sirleto, Antonio Novelli, Giulia Grisendi, Olivia Candini, Cintia Carella, Massimo Dominici, Franco Locatelli, Maria Ester Bernardo
The risk of malignant transformation of ex-vivo expanded human mesenchymal stromal cells (huMSCs) has been debated in the last years; however, the biosafety of these cells after exposure to supramaximal physical and chemical stress has never been systematically investigated.We established an experimental in vitro model to induce supramaximal physical (ionizing radiation, IR) and chemical (starvation) stress on ex-vivo expanded bone marrow (BM)-derived huMSCs and investigated their propensity to undergo malignant transformation...
October 15, 2016: Oncotarget
Amanda McGuire, Kaitlyn Miedema, Joseph R Fauver, Amber Rico, Tawfik Aboellail, Sandra L Quackenbush, Ann Hawkinson, Tony Schountz
Rodent-borne hantaviruses can cause two human diseases with many pathological similarities: hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in the western hemisphere and hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in the eastern hemisphere. Each virus is hosted by specific reservoir species without conspicuous disease. HCPS-causing hantaviruses require animal biosafety level-4 (ABSL-4) containment, which substantially limits experimental research of interactions between the viruses and their reservoir hosts. Maporal virus (MAPV) is a South American hantavirus not known to cause disease in humans, thus it can be manipulated under ABSL-3 conditions...
October 18, 2016: Viruses
Miroslawa Bilska, Haili Tang, David C Montefiori
Env-pseudotyped viruses are valuable reagents for studies of HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies. It is often assumed that all particles in the pseudovirus preparations are capable of only a single round of infection, making them a safe alternative to work with live HIV-1. Here we show that some Env-pseudotyped virus preparations give rise to low levels of replication-competent virus (RCV). These levels did not compromise results in the TZM-bl neutralization assay; however, their presence highlights a need to adhere to the same level of biosafety when working with Env-pseuodtyped viruses that is required for work with replication competent HIV-1...
October 19, 2016: AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses
Dong-Lin Xia, Yan-Pei Chen, Yu-Fei Wang, Xiao-Dong Li, Ning Bao, Hong He, Hai-Ying Gu
OBJECTIVES: Diabetic patients are at increased risk of severe skin infections. Covering the wound as early as possible can prevent infection and shorten the course of treatment. In this study, the authors fabricated a waterproof and breathable composite liquid dressing (CLD) that formed a barrier to bacteria and shortened healing time of diabetic rat skin ulcers. METHODS: The CLD was prepared in a formulation that, on evaporation of the liquid carrier, acts as a waterproof, breathable coating on injured skin...
November 2016: Advances in Skin & Wound Care
John Howard, Vladimir Murashov, Paul Schulte
Synthetic biology is an emerging interdisciplinary field of biotechnology that involves applying the principles of engineering and chemical design to biological systems. Biosafety professionals have done an excellent job in addressing research laboratory safety as synthetic biology and gene editing have emerged from the larger field of biotechnology. Despite these efforts, risks posed by synthetic biology are of increasing concern as research procedures scale up to industrial processes in the larger bioeconomy...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene
Mitchell K Monninger, Chrystal A Nguessan, Candace D Blancett, Kathleen A Kuehl, Cynthia A Rossi, Scott P Olschner, Priscilla L Williams, Steven L Goodman, Mei G Sun
Transmission electron microscopy can be used to observe the ultrastructure of viruses and other microbial pathogens with nanometer resolution. In a transmission electron microscope (TEM), the image is created by passing an electron beam through a specimen with contrast generated by electron scattering from dense elements in the specimen. Viruses do not normally contain dense elements, so a negative stain that places dense heavy metal salts around the sample is added to create a dark border. To prepare a virus sample for a negative stain transmission electron microscopy, a virus suspension is applied to a TEM grid specimen support, which is a 3mm diameter fragile specimen screen coated with a few nanometers of plastic film...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Virological Methods
Mohsen Golabi, Filiz Kuralay, Edwin W H Jager, Valerio Beni, Anthony P F Turner
Biosensors can deliver the rapid bacterial detection that is needed in many fields including food safety, clinical diagnostics, biosafety and biosecurity. Whole-cell imprinted polymers have the potential to be applied as recognition elements in biosensors for selective bacterial detection. In this paper, we report on the use of 3-aminophenylboronic acid (3-APBA) for the electrochemical fabrication of a cell-imprinted polymer (CIP). The use of a monomer bearing a boronic acid group, with its ability to specifically interact with cis-diol, allowed the formation of a polymeric network presenting both morphological and chemical recognition abilities...
September 26, 2016: Biosensors & Bioelectronics
Zhaogang Yang, Jing Xie, Jing Zhu, Chen Kang, Chiling Chiang, Xinmei Wang, Xiaobing Wang, Tairong Kuang, Feng Chen, Zhou Chen, Aili Zhang, Bo Yu, Robert J Lee, Lesheng Teng, L James Lee
Exosomes, the smallest subgroup of extracellular vesicles, have been recognized as extracellular organelles that contain genetic and proteomic information for long distance intercellular communication. Exosome-based drug delivery is currently a subject of intensive research. Here, we report a novel strategy to produce nanoscale exosome-mimics (EMs) in sufficient quantity for gene delivery in cancer both in vitro and in vivo. Size-controllable EMs were generated at a high yield by serial extrusion of non-tumorigenic epithelial MCF-10A cells through filters with different pore sizes...
October 11, 2016: Journal of Controlled Release: Official Journal of the Controlled Release Society
Igor Slivac, David Guay, Mathias Mangion, Juliette Champeil, Bruno Gaillet
Delivery of nucleic acid-based molecules in human cells is a highly studied approach for the treatment of several disorders including monogenic diseases and cancers. Non-viral vectors for DNA and RNA transfer, although in general less efficient than virus-based systems, are particularly well adapted mostly due to the absence of biosafety concerns. Non-viral methods could be classified in two main groups: physical and vector-assisted delivery systems. Both groups comprise several different methods, none of them universally applicable...
October 14, 2016: Expert Opinion on Biological Therapy
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