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C Laird Birmingham, Shelley Sidhu, John Anderson
PURPOSE: To determine whether the fear response is the same in AN as in controls. METHOD: We recorded the EEG in 10 participants with a history of AN and in 10 controls during a fear stimulus. The response of the brain was recorded using EEG LORETA. The recording was analyzed for a marked increase in activity in the amygdala, uncus, insula, and anterior cingulate from 300 to 500 ms following the stimulus. RESULTS: The order or response of the amygdala, uncus, insula, and anterior cingulate was not significantly different in AN and controls...
March 14, 2018: Eating and Weight Disorders: EWD
Adam J Stark, Christopher T Smith, Kalen J Petersen, Paula Trujillo, Nelleke C van Wouwe, Manus J Donahue, Robert M Kessler, Ariel Y Deutch, David H Zald, Daniel O Claassen
Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by widespread degeneration of monoaminergic (especially dopaminergic) networks, manifesting with a number of both motor and non-motor symptoms. Regional alterations to dopamine D2/3 receptors in PD patients are documented in striatal and some extrastriatal areas, and medications that target D2/3 receptors can improve motor and non-motor symptoms. However, data regarding the combined pattern of D2/3 receptor binding in both striatal and extrastriatal regions in PD are limited...
2018: NeuroImage: Clinical
Weizhi Yu, Hong Xu, Ying Xue, Dong An, Huairui Li, Wei Chen, Deqin Yu, Yiping Sun, Jianmei Ma, Yiyuan Tang, Zhaoyang Xiao, Shengming Yin
Introduction: Social isolation enhances the aggressive behavior of animals, but the detailed mechanism remains unclear. Epigenetic studies have suggested that Htr2c RNA editing is closely related to aggressive behavior. This study aims to obtain a fundamental understanding of how social isolation impacts adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 1 (ADAR1, RNA editing enzyme) and Htr2c RNA editing, leading to aggressive behavior, and explore the effective solutions for the recovery of this behavior...
March 2018: Brain and Behavior
Germano Orrù, Mauro Giovanni Carta
Background: Bipolar Disorder (BD), along with depression and schizophrenia, is one of the most serious mental illnesses, and one of the top 20 causes of severe impairment in everyday life. Recent molecular studies, using both traditional approaches and new procedures such as Whole-Genome Sequencing (WGS), have suggested that genetic factors could significantly contribute to the development of BD, with heritability estimates of up to 85%. However, it is assumed that BD is a multigenic and multifactorial illness with environmental factors that strongly contribute to disease development/progression, which means that progress in genetic knowledge of BD might be difficult to interpret in clinical practice...
2018: Clinical Practice and Epidemiology in Mental Health: CP & EMH
Jiayue Cai, Soojin Lee, Fang Ba, Saurabh Garg, Laura J Kim, Aiping Liu, Diana Kim, Z Jane Wang, Martin J McKeown
Falls and balance difficulties remain a major source of morbidity in Parkinson's Disease (PD) and are stubbornly resistant to therapeutic interventions. The mechanisms of gait impairment in PD are incompletely understood but may involve changes in the Pedunculopontine Nucleus (PPN) and its associated connections. We utilized fMRI to explore the modulation of PPN connectivity by Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation (GVS) in healthy controls ( n = 12) and PD subjects even without overt evidence of Freezing of Gait (FOG) while on medication ( n = 23)...
2018: Frontiers in Neuroscience
Katja Bertsch, Karen Hillmann, Sabine C Herpertz
One of the core symptoms of borderline personality disorder (BPD) is emotion dysregulation, which comprises emotion sensitivity, heightened and labile negative affect, deficient appropriate regulation strategies, and a surplus of maladaptive regulation strategies. Although earlier studies provided some evidence for threat hypersensitivity in terms of a negatively biased perception of other people ("negativity bias") and deficits in the recognition of full-blown anger, i.e., higher error rates and slower reaction times, researchers have only recently started studying effects of interindividual differences (e...
March 14, 2018: Psychopathology
Oscar A Klockars, Anica Klockars, Allen S Levine, Pawel K Olszewski
Oxytocin (OT) at acting central nuclei decreases meal size and reduces intake of palatable sweet solutions. It remains largely unclear as to which brain sites mediate OT's effect on palatability versus energy or the combination of those aspects of consumption. Here, we expanded the search for sites that mediate anorexigenic properties of OT by focusing on two subdivisions of the amygdala, its central (CNA) and basolateral (BLA) nuclei. We injected OT directly into the BLA or CNA in rats and assessed intake of standard chow induced by energy deprivation and intake of sweet solutions in nondeprived animals...
March 13, 2018: Neuroreport
Sean J Farley, Heba Albazboz, Benjamin J De Corte, Jason J Radley, John H Freeman
Previous studies found that reversible inactivation of the central amygdala (CeA) severely impairs acquisition and retention of cerebellum-dependent eye-blink conditioning (EBC) with an auditory conditioned stimulus (CS). A monosynaptic pathway between the CeA and basilar pontine nuclei (BPN) may be capable of facilitating cerebellar learning. However, given that the CeA projects to the medial auditory thalamus, a critical part of the auditory CS pathway in EBC, the CeA influence on cerebellar learning could be specific to auditory stimuli...
March 10, 2018: Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Yong-Ku Kim, Byung-Joo Ham, Kyu-Man Han
The etiology of depression is characterized by the interplay of genetic and environmental factors and brain structural alteration. Childhood adversity is a major contributing factor in the development of depression. Interactions between childhood adversity and candidate genes for depression could affect brain morphology via the modulation of neurotrophic factors, serotonergic neurotransmission, or the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, and this pathway may explain the subsequent onset of depression...
March 10, 2018: Progress in Neuro-psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry
F Wang, D N Feng, Y Liu, Z Liu, T Sun
Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of microsurgical in the treatment of temporal lobe cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) with epilepsy. Methods: Temporal lobe CCM patients with epilepsy admitted to our department were collected from January 2010 to September 2016. Locations of the CCM were divided into (1) lateral-lateral to the collateral sulcus; (2) mesial-mesial to the collateral sulcus. In the lateral group, patients were underwent intraoperative electrocorticography (ECoG)-guided resection of lesion and hemosiderin rim...
March 6, 2018: Zhonghua Yi Xue za Zhi [Chinese medical journal]
Jonas Kneer, Viola Borchardt, Christian Kärgel, Christopher Sinke, Claudia Massau, Gilian Tenbergen, Jorge Ponseti, Henrik Walter, Klaus M Beier, Boris Schiffer, Kolja Schiltz, Martin Walter, Tillmann H C Kruger
BACKGROUND: Child sexual abuse and neglect have been related to an increased risk for the development of a wide range of behavioral, psychological, and sexual problems and increased rates of suicidal behavior. Contrary to the large amount of research focusing on the negative mental health consequences of child sexual abuse, very little is known about the characteristics of child sexual offenders and the neuronal underpinnings contributing to child sexual offending. METHODS AND SAMPLE: This study investigates differences in resting state functional connectivity (rs-FC) between non-pedophilic child sexual offenders (N = 20; CSO-P) and matched healthy controls (N = 20; HC) using a seed-based approach...
February 22, 2018: Journal of Psychiatric Research
L A Kirby, D Moraczewski, K Warnell, K Velnoskey, E Redcay
The ability to perceive others' actions and goals from human motion (i.e., biological motion perception) is a critical component of social perception and may be linked to the development of real-world social relationships. Adult research demonstrates two key nodes of the brain's biological motion perception system-amygdala and posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS)-are linked to variability in social network properties. The relation between social perception and social network properties, however, has not yet been investigated in middle childhood-a time when individual differences in social experiences and social perception are growing...
March 6, 2018: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
Valerie L Kinner, Oliver T Wolf, Christian J Merz
Relapses represent a major limitation to the long-term remission of pathological fear and anxiety. Stress modulates the acquisition and expression of fear memories and appears to promote fear recovery in patients with anxiety disorders. However, the neural correlates underlying stress hormone effects on the return of fear in humans remain unexplored. Likewise, little is known about the interactions between sex and stress hormones on return of fear phenomena. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging study, 32 men and 32 women were exposed to a fear renewal paradigm with fear acquisition in context A and extinction in context B...
February 21, 2018: Psychoneuroendocrinology
Lauren A Demers, Kelly Jedd McKenzie, Ruskin H Hunt, Dante Cicchetti, Raquel A Cowell, Fred A Rogosch, Sheree L Toth, Kathleen M Thomas
BACKGROUND: Individuals with a history of maltreatment show altered amygdala reactivity to emotional stimuli, atypical frontal regulatory control, and differences in frontolimbic connectivity compared with nonmaltreated controls. However, despite early trauma, many individuals who experience maltreatment show resilience or adaptive functioning in adulthood including positive social, educational, and occupational outcomes. METHODS: The present study used a psychophysiological interaction model to examine the effect of adult adaptive functioning on group differences between maltreated and nonmaltreated adults in task-based amygdala functional connectivity...
February 2018: Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging
Susan J Melhorn, Mary K Askren, Wendy K Chung, Mario Kratz, Tyler A Bosch, Vidhi Tyagi, Mary F Webb, Mary Rosalynn B De Leon, Thomas J Grabowski, Rudolph L Leibel, Ellen A Schur
Background: Variants in the first intron of the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene increase obesity risk. People with "high-risk" FTO genotypes exhibit preference for high-fat foods, reduced satiety responsiveness, and greater food intake consistent with impaired satiety. Objective: We sought central nervous system mechanisms that might underlie impaired satiety perception in people with a higher risk of obesity based on their FTO genotype. Design: We performed a cross-sectional study in a sample that was enriched for obesity and included 20 higher-risk participants with the AA (risk) genotype at the rs9939609 locus of FTO and 94 lower-risk participants with either the AT or TT genotype...
February 1, 2018: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Jeanie K Meckes, Patrick H Lim, Stephanie L Wert, Wendy Luo, Stephanie A Gacek, Dana Platt, Ryan Jankord, Kathrin Saar, Eva E Redei
Acute stress responsiveness is a quantitative trait that varies in severity from one individual to another; however, the genetic component underlying the individual variation is largely unknown. Fischer 344 (F344) and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat strains show large differences in behavioral responsiveness to acute stress, such as freezing behavior in response to footshock during the conditioning phase of contextual fear conditioning (CFC). Quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been identified for behavioral responsiveness to acute stress in the defensive burying (DB) and open field test (OFT) from a reciprocal F2 cross of F344 and WKY rat strains...
2018: PloS One
Vejay N Vakharia, Rachel Sparks, Kuo Li, Aidan G O'Keeffe, Anna Miserocchi, Andrew W McEvoy, Michael R Sperling, Ashwini Sharan, Sebastien Ourselin, John S Duncan, Chengyuan Wu
OBJECTIVE: Surgical resection of the mesial temporal structures brings seizure remission in 65% of individuals with drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LiTT) is a novel therapy that may provide a minimally invasive means of ablating the mesial temporal structures with similar outcomes, while minimizing damage to the neocortex. Systematic trajectory planning helps ensure safety and optimal seizure freedom through adequate ablation of the amygdalohippocampal complex (AHC)...
March 12, 2018: Epilepsia
T G Adams, B Kelmendi, C A Brake, P Gruner, C L Badour, C Pittenger
Individuals with OCD often identify psychosocial stress as a factor that exacerbates their symptoms, and many trace the onset of symptoms to a stressful period of life or a discrete traumatic incident. However, the pathophysiological relationship between stress and OCD remains poorly characterized: it is unclear whether trauma or stress is an independent cause of OCD symptoms, a triggering factor that interacts with a preexisting diathesis, or simply a nonspecific factor that can exacerbate OCD along with other aspects of psychiatric symptomatology...
January 2018: Chronic Stress
Elena Makovac, Jonathan Smallwood, David R Watson, Frances Meeten, Hugo D Critchley, Cristina Ottaviani
Background: The Cognitive Avoidance Theory of Worry argues that worry is a cognitive strategy adopted to control the physiological arousal associated with anxiety. According to this theory, pathological worry, as in Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD), is verbal in nature, negative and abstract, rather than concrete. Neuroimaging studies link the expression of worry to characteristic modes of brain functional connectivity, especially in relation to the amygdala. However, the distinctive features of worry (verbal, abstract, negative), and their relationship to physiological arousal, have not so far been mapped to brain function...
2018: NeuroImage: Clinical
Josh M Cisler, Anthony Privratsky, Sonet Smitherman, Ryan J Herringa, Clinton D Kilts
Background: A wealth of research has investigated the impact of early life trauma exposure on functional brain activation during facial emotion processing and has often demonstrated amygdala hyperactivity and weakened connectivity between amygdala and medial PFC (mPFC). There have been notably limited investigations linking these previous node-specific findings into larger-scale network models of brain organization. Method: To address these gaps, we applied graph theoretical analyses to fMRI data collected during a facial emotion processing task among 88 adolescent girls (n = 59 exposed to direct physical or sexual assault; n = 29 healthy controls), aged 11-17, during fMRI...
2018: NeuroImage: Clinical
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