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Nephropathic cystinosis

Francesco Bellomo, Anna Signorile, Grazia Tamma, Marianna Ranieri, Francesco Emma, Domenico De Rasmo
Nephropathic cystinosis (NC) is a rare disease caused by mutations in the CTNS gene encoding for cystinosin, a lysosomal transmembrane cystine/H+ symporter, which promotes the efflux of cystine from lysosomes to cytosol. NC is the most frequent cause of Fanconi syndrome (FS) in young children, the molecular basis of which is not well established. Proximal tubular cells have very high metabolic rate due to the active transport of many solutes. Not surprisingly, mitochondrial disorders are often characterized by FS...
March 16, 2018: Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences: CMLS
Amer Jamalpoor, Rolf W Sparidans, Carla Pou Casellas, Johannes J M Rood, Mansi Joshi, Rosalinde Masereeuw, Manoe J Janssen
Nephropathic cystinosis is characterized by abnormal intralysosomal accumulation of cystine throughout the body causing irreversible damage to various organs, particularly the kidneys. Cysteamine, the currently available treatment, can reduce lysosomal cystine and postpone disease progression. However, cysteamine poses serious side effects and does not address all symptoms of cystinosis. To screen for new treatment options, a rapid and reliable high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method was developed to quantify cystine in conditionally immortalized human proximal tubular epithelial cells (ciPTEC)...
March 8, 2018: Biomedical Chromatography: BMC
Maria Bitsori, Eleni Vergadi, Emmanouil Galanakis
Cystinosis is a rare autosomal recessive lysosomal transport disorder, characterized by the accumulation of the aminoacid cystine and progressive dysfunction of several organs. Kidneys are severely affected, and the most frequent form, infantile nephropathic cystinosis, presents with growth failure in infancy, renal Fanconi syndrome and end-stage renal disease by the first decade of life. We report of a girl with infantile nephropathic cystinosis that has reached adolescence without the need of renal replacement therapy and without extrarenal manifestations despite her delayed diagnosis and treatment initiation...
February 14, 2018: CEN Case Reports
Aurélia Bertholet-Thomas, Debora Claramunt-Taberner, Ségolène Gaillard, Georges Deschênes, Elisabeth Sornay-Rendu, Pawel Szulc, Martine Cohen-Solal, Solenne Pelletier, Marie-Christine Carlier, Pierre Cochat, Justine Bacchetta
BACKGROUND: Bone impairment appears to be a novel complication of nephropathic cystinosis despite cysteamine therapy. Its exact underlying pathophysiology is nevertheless unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate bone status among patients included in the French Crystobs study. METHODS: In addition to clinical data, bone status was evaluated using biomarkers (ALP, PTH, 25-D, 1-25D, FGF23), DXA (spine and total body), and high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) at the tibia and radius...
February 12, 2018: Pediatric Nephrology: Journal of the International Pediatric Nephrology Association
Funda Bastug, Hulya Nalcacioglu, Fatih Ozaltin, Emine Korkmaz, Sibel Yel
Cystinosis is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from defective lysosomal transport of cystine due to mutations in the cystinosin lysosomal cystine transporter (CTNS) gene. The clinical phenotype of nephropathic cystinosis is characterized by renal tubular Fanconi syndrome and development of end-stage renal disease during the first decade. Although metabolic acidosis is the classically prominent finding of the disease, a few cases may present with hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis mimicking Bartter syndrome...
January 2018: Iranian Journal of Kidney Diseases
Danielle Armas, Robert J Holt, Nils F Confer, Gregg C Checani, Mohammad Obaidi, Yuli Xie, Meg Brannagan
INTRODUCTION: Cystinosis is a rare, metabolic, autosomal recessive, genetic lysosomal storage disorder characterized by an accumulation of cystine in various organs and tissues. Cysteamine bitartrate (CB) is a cystine-depleting aminothiol agent approved in the United States and Europe in immediate-release and delayed-release (DR) formulations for the treatment of nephropathic cystinosis in children and adults. It is recommended that CBDR be administered with fruit juice (except grapefruit juice) for maximum absorption...
February 6, 2018: Advances in Therapy
Debora Claramunt-Taberner, Sacha Flammier, Ségolène Gaillard, Pierre Cochat, Olivier Peyruchaud, Irma Machuca-Gayet, Justine Bacchetta
Background: Bone impairment is a poorly described complication of nephropathic cystinosis (NC). The objectives of this study were to evaluate in vitro effects of cystinosin (CTNS) mutations on bone resorption and of cysteamine treatment on bone cells [namely human osteoclasts (OCs) and murine osteoblasts]. Methods: Human OCs were differentiated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients and healthy donors (HDs). Cells were treated with increasing doses of cysteamine in PBMCs or on mature OCs to evaluate its impact on differentiation and resorption, respectively...
January 19, 2018: Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation
Beatrice Paola Festa, Zhiyong Chen, Marine Berquez, Huguette Debaix, Natsuko Tokonami, Jenny Ann Prange, Glenn van de Hoek, Cremonesi Alessio, Andrea Raimondi, Nathalie Nevo, Rachel H Giles, Olivier Devuyst, Alessandro Luciani
The endolysosomal system sustains the reabsorptive activity of specialized epithelial cells. Lysosomal storage diseases such as nephropathic cystinosis cause a major dysfunction of epithelial cells lining the kidney tubule, resulting in massive losses of vital solutes in the urine. The mechanisms linking lysosomal defects and epithelial dysfunction remain unknown, preventing the development of disease-modifying therapies. Here we demonstrate, by combining genetic and pharmacologic approaches, that lysosomal dysfunction in cystinosis results in defective autophagy-mediated clearance of damaged mitochondria...
January 11, 2018: Nature Communications
Gema Ariceta, Vincenzo Giordano, Fernando Santos
Cystinosis is a rare autosomal-recessive lysosomal storage disease with high morbidity and mortality. It is caused by mutations in the CTNS gene that encodes the cystine transporter, cystinosin, which leads to lysosomal cystine accumulation. Patients with infantile nephropathic cystinosis, the most common and most severe clinical form of cystinosis, commonly present with renal Fanconi syndrome by 6-12 months of age, and without specific treatment, almost all will develop end-stage renal disease (ESRD) by 10-12 years of age...
December 19, 2017: Pediatric Nephrology: Journal of the International Pediatric Nephrology Association
Mahmut Ecel, Ayça Sarı, Ali Delibaş
We present a 7-year-old patient who was diagnosed with asymptomatic nephropathic cystinosis following the detection of the pathognomonic corneal white crystalline opacities during a routine eye examination.
October 2017: Turkish Journal of Ophthalmology
Forough Sadeghipour, Mitra Basiratnia, Ali Derakhshan, Majid Fardaei
Nephropathic cystinosis is an inherited lysosomal transport disorder caused by mutations in the CTNS gene that encodes for a lysosomal membrane transporter, cystinosin. Dysfunction in this protein leads to cystine accumulation in the cells of different organs. The accumulation of cystine in the kidneys becomes apparent with renal tubular Fanconi syndrome between 6 and 12 months of age and leads to renal failure in the first decade of life. The aim of this study was to analyze the CTNS mutations in 20 Iranian patients, from 20 unrelated families, all of whom were afflicted with infantile nephropathic cystinosis...
2017: Human Genome Variation
Satomi Higashi, Natsuki Matsunoshita, Masako Otani, Etsuro Tokuhiro, Kandai Nozu, Shuichi Ito
BACKGROUND: Cystinosis is a rare autosomal recessive lysosomal disorder characterized by the accumulation of cystine in lysosomes. Cystinosis is much rarer in Asian than Caucasian populations. There are only 14 patients have with cystinosis alive in Japan. Most cystinosis is the nephropathic infantile form, as indicated by its apparent and severe clinical manifestations, including renal and ocular symptoms. Patients with the nephropathic juvenile form account for 5% of those with cystinosis...
September 26, 2017: BMC Nephrology
Manel Jellouli, Meriem Ferjani, Kamel Abidi, Chokri Zarrouk, Jaouida Abdelmoula, Tahar Gargah
Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive, lysosomal storage disease characterised by the accumulation of the amino acid cystine in different organs and tissues. It is a multisystemic disease that can present with renal and extra-renal manifestations. In this report, we present the first case of transplanted nephropathic cystinosis in a Tunisian child. A 4-year-old Tunisian boy born to nonconsanguineous parents, was treated in our medical services in 1990 for cystinosis. Since the age of five months, he developed symptoms of severe weight loss, vomiting, dehydration, and polyuria...
September 2017: Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation
Serra Sürmeli Döven, Ali Delibaş, Uğur Raşit Karacan, Selma Ünal
BACKGROUND: Cystinosis is a rare metabolic genetic disorder caused by a mutation in the cystinosin lysosomal cystine transporter (CTNS) gene. The diagnosis of nephropathic cystinosis (NC) is made by observing corneal cystine crystals and/or measuring the cystine content of leukocytes. Analysis by the CTNS gene mutation confirms the diagnosis of cystinosis. But leukocyte cystine level measurement and CTNS gene analysis haven't been widely available and cystine crystals in the cornea may not be apparent in the first months of life...
September 4, 2017: Pediatrics International: Official Journal of the Japan Pediatric Society
Rezan Topaloglu, Bora Gulhan, Mihriban İnözü, Nur Canpolat, Alev Yilmaz, Aytül Noyan, İsmail Dursun, İbrahim Gökçe, Metin Kaya Gürgöze, Nurver Akinci, Esra Baskin, Erkin Serdaroğlu, Beltinge Demircioğlu Kiliç, Selçuk Yüksel, Duygu Övünç Hacihamdioğlu, Emine Korkmaz, Mutlu Hayran, Fatih Ozaltin
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Infantile nephropathic cystinosis is a severe disease that occurs due to mutations in the cystinosis gene, and it is characterized by progressive dysfunction of multiple organs; >100 cystinosis gene mutations have been identified in multiple populations. Our study aimed to identify the clinical characteristics and spectrum of cystinosis gene mutations in Turkish pediatric patients with cystinosis. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: We identified the clinical characteristics and spectrum of cystinosis gene mutations in Turkish patients with cystinosis in a multicenter registry that was established for data collection...
August 9, 2017: Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology: CJASN
Goran Medic, Miriam van der Weijden, Andreas Karabis, Michiel Hemels
OBJECTIVES: To summarize available clinical evidence for cysteamine bitartrate preparations in the treatment of nephropathic cystinosis as identified through a systematic literature review (SLR). METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process and Embase using Ovid with a predefined search strategy through 19 January 2016. All publicly available clinical reports on the use of delayed-release (DR) cysteamine bitartrate (Procysbi (1) ) or immediate-release (IR) cysteamine bitartrate (Cystagon (2) ) in patients with cystinosis were included...
August 3, 2017: Current Medical Research and Opinion
Aurélia Bertholet-Thomas, Julien Berthiller, Velibor Tasic, Behrouz Kassai, Hasan Otukesh, Marcella Greco, Jochen Ehrich, Rejane de Paula Bernardes, Georges Deschênes, Sally-Ann Hulton, Michel Fischbach, Kenza Soulami, Bassam Saeed, Ehsan Valavi, Carlos Jose Cobenas, Bülent Hacihamdioglu, Gabrielle Weiler, Pierre Cochat, Justine Bacchetta
BACKGROUND: Nephropathic cystinosis is a rare inherited metabolic disorder leading to progressive renal failure and extra-renal comorbidity. The prognosis relies on early adherence to cysteamine treatment and symptomatic therapies. Developing nations [DiN] experience many challenges for management of cystinosis. The aim of this study was to assess the management characteristics in DiN compared with developed nations [DeN]. METHODS: A questionnaire was sent between April 2010 and May 2011 to 87 members of the International Pediatric Nephrology Association, in 50 countries...
July 3, 2017: BMC Nephrology
Hakan Doneray, Mohammed Aldahmesh, Gulsah Yilmaz, Emine Cinici, Zerrin Orbak
Cystinosis is a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by the accumulation of cystine in lysosomes, which results from defects in the carrier-mediated transport protein encoded by the CTNS gene. Infantile nephropathic cystinosis (INC) is one of the major complications of cystinosis. It is characterized by findings of Fanconi's syndrome within the first year of life. Here we report two patients with INC presenting with signs of Fanconi's syndrome and describe a novel CTNS mutation.
June 2017: Eurasian Journal of Medicine
Macarena Cabrera-Serrano, Reimar C Junckerstorff, Ali Alisheri, Alan Pestronk, Nigel G Laing, Conrad C Weihl, Phillipa J Lamont
Nephropathic cystinosis is an autosomal recessive lysosomal disease in which cystine cannot exit the lysosome to complete its degradation in the cytoplasm, thus accumulating in tissues. Some patients develop a distal myopathy involving mainly hand muscles. Myopathology descriptions from only 5 patients are available in the literature. We present a comprehensive clinical, pathological and genetic description of 3 patients from 2 families with nephropathic cystinosis. Intrafamiliar variability was detected in one family in which one sibling developed a severe distal myopathy while the other sibling did not show any signs of skeletal muscle involvement...
September 2017: Neuromuscular Disorders: NMD
Masih Tajdini, Mehdi Bayati, Ali Vasheghani-Farahani
Cystinosis is a rare, autosomal-recessive genetic disorder. The kidneys are commonly involved, as there is cystinosin protein malfunction, and nephropathic cystinosis ensues. Although cardiac and vascular involvements are rare, we describe a unique case of aortic dissection in a 25-year-old female with cystinosis. We discuss the possible aetiologies of aortic dissection in this condition.
September 2017: Cardiology in the Young
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