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Ethics, catholic

David S Oderberg
I explore the increasingly important issue of cooperation in immoral actions, particularly in connection with healthcare. Conscientious objection, especially as pertains to religious freedom in healthcare, has become a pressing issue in the light of the US Supreme Court judgement in Hobby Lobby Section 'Moral evaluation using the basic principles of cooperation' outlines a theory of cooperation inspired by Catholic moral theologians such as those cited by the court. The theory has independent plausibility and is at least worthy of serious consideration-in part because it is an instance of double-effect reasoning, which is also independently plausible despite its association with moral theology...
October 3, 2016: Journal of Medical Ethics
Debra B Stulberg, Rebecca A Jackson, Lori R Freedman
CONTEXT: Catholic hospitals control a growing share of health care in the United States and prohibit many common reproductive services, including ones related to sterilization, contraception, abortion and fertility. Professional ethics guidelines recommend that clinicians who deny patients reproductive services for moral or religious reasons provide a timely referral to prevent patient harm. Referral practices in Catholic hospitals, however, have not been explored. METHODS: Twenty-seven obstetrician-gynecologists who were currently working or had worked in Catholic facilities participated in semistructured interviews in 2011-2012...
September 2016: Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health
Americo Cicchetti, Alexandra Berrino, Marina Casini, Paola Codella, Giuseppina Facco, Alessandra Fiore, Giuseppe Marano, Marco Marchetti, Emanuela Midolo, Roberta Minacori, Pietro Refolo, Federica Romano, Matteo Ruggeri, Dario Sacchini, Antonio G Spagnolo, Irene Urbina, Stefania Vaglio, Giuliano Grazzini, Giancarlo M Liumbruno
Although existing clinical evidence shows that the transfusion of blood components is becoming increasingly safe, the risk of transmission of known and unknown pathogens, new pathogens or re-emerging pathogens still persists. Pathogen reduction technologies may offer a new approach to increase blood safety. The study is the output of collaboration between the Italian National Blood Centre and the Post-Graduate School of Health Economics and Management, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. A large, multidisciplinary team was created and divided into six groups, each of which addressed one or more HTA domains...
July 2016: Blood Transfusion, Trasfusione del Sangue
Valérie Leclercq
Mostly based on Belgian and French-language source material (such as hospital archives, medical ethics, Catholic nursing manuals, etc.), this article sheds light on the way that information around serious illnesses was managed in the late 19th and early 20th century. It is suggested that information-giving practices were largely defined by the paternalistic nature of pre-mid-20th century medicine and although these practices aimed to the same objective, their content varied greatly according to the medical professionals or caregivers involved (doctors, catholic nurses, priests)...
2016: Gesnerus
Douglas Sipp
The commercial provision of putative stem cell-based medical interventions in the absence of conclusive evidence of safety and efficacy has formed the basis of an unregulated industry for more than a decade. Many clinics offering such supposed stem cell treatments include statements about the 'ethical' nature of somatic (often colloquially referred to as 'adult' stem cells) stem cells, in specific contrast to human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), which have been the subject of intensive political, legal, and religious controversy since their first derivation in 1998...
May 23, 2016: Developing World Bioethics
Daniel P Sulmasy
This article traces the history of the concept of dignity in Western thought, arguing that it became a formal Catholic theological concept only in the late nineteenth century. Three uses of the word are distinguished: intrinsic, attributed, and inflorescent dignity, of which, it is argued, the intrinsic conception is foundational. The moral norms associated with respect for intrinsic dignity are discussed briefly. The scriptural and theological bases for adopting the concept of dignity as a Christian idea are elucidated...
February 8, 2016: Medicine, Health Care, and Philosophy
Lorenzo Beltrame
Stem cell research regulations are highly variable across nations, notwithstanding shared and common ethical concerns. Dominant in political debates has been the so-called embryo question. However, the permissibility of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research varies among national regulatory frameworks. Scholars have explained differences by resorting to notions of political culture, traditions of ethical reasoning, discursive strategies and political manoeuvring of involved actors. Explanations based on the role of religion or other cultural structural variables are also employed...
January 21, 2016: Developing World Bioethics
Catarina Samorinha, Milton Severo, Elisabete Alves, Helena Machado, Bárbara Figueiredo, Susana Silva
Between 2011 and 2012, 213 heterosexual couples undergoing fertility treatments in a Portuguese public fertility centre were systematically recruited to assess factors associated with willingness to donate embryos for research. Data were collected by questionnaire. Most couples (87.3%; 95% CI 82.1 to 91.5) were willing to donate embryos for research, citing benefits for science, health and infertile patients. Almost all couples (94.3%; 95% CI 89.8 to 96.7) reached consensus about the decision. Willingness to donate was more frequent in women younger than 36 years (adjusted OR 3...
February 2016: Reproductive Biomedicine Online
Lisa Schencker
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 26, 2015: Modern Healthcare
Katherine Wasson, Emily Anderson, Erika Hagstrom, Michael McCarthy, Kayhan Parsi, Mark Kuczewski
As the field of clinical ethics consultation sets standards and moves forward with the Quality Attestation process, questions should be raised about what ethical issues really do arise in practice. There is limited data on the type and number of ethics consultations conducted across different settings. At Loyola University Medical Center, we conducted a retrospective review of our ethics consultations from 2008 through 2013. One hundred fifty-six cases met the eligibility criteria. We analyzed demographic data on these patients and conducted a content analysis of the ethics consultation write-ups coding both the frequency of ethical issues and most significant, or key, ethical issue per case...
September 2016: HEC Forum: An Interdisciplinary Journal on Hospitals' Ethical and Legal Issues
Božidar Banović, Veljko Turanjanin
Background Euthanasia is one of the most intriguing ethical, medical and law issues that marked whole XX century and beginning of the XXI century, sharply dividing scientific and unscientific public to its supporters and opponents. It also appears as one of the points where all three major religions (Catholic, Orthodox, and Islamic) have the same view. They are strongly against legalizing mercy killing, emphasizing the holiness of life as a primary criterion by which the countries should start in their considerations...
October 2014: Iranian Journal of Public Health
Mathana Amaris Fiona Sivaraman, Siti Nurani Mohd Noor
Embryonic Stem Cell Research (ESCR) raises ethical issues. In the process of research, embryos may be destroyed and, to some, such an act entails the 'killing of human life'. Past studies have sought the views of scientists and the general public on the ethics of ESCR. This study, however, explores multi-faith ethical viewpoints, in particular, those of Buddhists, Hindus and Catholics in Malaysia, on ESCR. Responses were gathered via semi-structured, face-to-face interviews. Three main ethical quandaries emerged from the data: (1) sanctity of life, (2) do no harm, and (3) 'intention' of the research...
April 2016: Science and Engineering Ethics
Mary Harrah
When is treatment an ordinary versus extraordinary intervention? In walking with her father through end-stage renal disease and congestive heart failure, a nurse explores the issue of appropriate intervention and the need for better education of patients. Ethical and religious directives for Catholic healthcare are discussed.
April 2015: Journal of Christian Nursing: a Quarterly Publication of Nurses Christian Fellowship
Ben A Rich
Recently the scope of protections afforded those healthcare professionals and institutions that refuse to provide certain interventions on the grounds of conscience have expanded, in some instances insulating providers (institutional and individual) from any liability or sanction for harms that patients experience as a result. With the exponential increase in the penetration of Catholic-affiliated healthcare across the country, physicians and nurses who are not practicing Catholics are nevertheless required to execute documents pledging to conform their patient care to the Ethical and Religious Directives for Health Care Services as a condition of employment or medical staff privileges...
April 2015: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
Jochen Sautermeister
BACKGROUND: Current medical research in the area of xenotransplantation is driven by the aim to save human lives and to improve the quality of life of those suffering from organ insufficiencies. METHODS: This study reflects the therapeutic intent of xenotransplantation from a theological-ethical perspective. Regarding statements of Christian communities, the analysis focuses mainly on catholic documents. This study takes into account the document on Prospects for Xenotransplantation by the Pontifical Academy for Life as well as a position paper on xenotransplantation released as a collaboration between the German Bishops Conference (Catholic) and the Evangelical Church in Germany (Protestant)...
May 2015: Xenotransplantation
Jason Phua, Gavin M Joynt, Masaji Nishimura, Yiyun Deng, Sheila Nainan Myatra, Yiong Huak Chan, Nguyen Gia Binh, Cheng Cheng Tan, Mohammad Omar Faruq, Yaseen M Arabi, Bambang Wahjuprajitno, Shih-Feng Liu, Seyed Mohammad Reza Hashemian, Waqar Kashif, Dusit Staworn, Jose Emmanuel Palo, Younsuck Koh
IMPORTANCE: Little data exist on end-of-life care practices in intensive care units (ICUs) in Asia. OBJECTIVE: To describe physicians' attitudes toward withholding and withdrawal of life-sustaining treatments in end-of-life care and to evaluate factors associated with observed attitudes. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Self-administered structured and scenario-based survey conducted among 1465 physicians (response rate, 59.6%) who manage patients in ICUs (May-December 2012) at 466 ICUs (response rate, 59...
March 2015: JAMA Internal Medicine
Lindsey Marugg, Marie-Noelle Atkinson, Ashley Fernandes
BACKGROUND/HYPOTHESIS: The traditional ethical model of the "Four-Box Method" can be adapted to integrate the perspective of a Catholic physician. In an increasingly secularist environment, medical students and physicians are often asked to "leave religious beliefs at the door" and not consider the care and stewardship of our own morality and involvement as a provider. We reject this view. A patient's own religious and moral beliefs should be respected to the extent that they do not destroy our own; for us, the Catholic viewpoint can shine a light into dark corners and aid us in translating true things to patients of any religion...
November 2014: Linacre Quarterly
Ron Hamel
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2014: Health Progress
Maureen Cavanagh
The practice of voluntarily stopping eating and drinking (VSED) in order to hasten death poses a unique problem for the Catholic hospice. Hospice staff may be confronted with patients already on their service who decide to pursue this option for ending their lives. Patients not on hospice service who are contemplating VSED are often advised to contact hospice for symptom palliation associated with the process of VSED. Intentionally hastening death not only violates the sanctity of human life and the Ethical and Religious Directives the Catholic hospice is bound to uphold, but it also runs counter to the general philosophy that hospice neither hastens nor postpones death...
August 2014: Linacre Quarterly
Alessandro Porro, Bruno Falconi, Carlo Cristini, Lorenzo Lorusso, Antonia F Franchini
Medicine in the second half of the nineteenth century takes on some characteristics of modernity. These characteristics are worthy of our attention because they help us to understand better some of the current problems of hygiene and public health. One of the topics that was most discussed in the scientific-academic milieu of the second half of the nineteenth century was cremation. There was a poetic precedent: the cremation of Percy Bysse Shelley (1792-1822). The earliest apparatus to completely destroy the corpse was made in Italy and Germany in the 1870s...
February 17, 2012: Journal of Public Health Research
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