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Ventilator synchrony

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28485314/effects-of-propofol-on-respiratory-drive-and-patient-ventilator-synchrony-during-pressure-support-ventilation-in-postoperative-patients-a-prospective-study
#1
Ling Liu, Ai-Ping Wu, Yi Yang, Song-Qiao Liu, Ying-Zi Huang, Jian-Feng Xie, Chun Pan, Cong-Shan Yang, Hai-Bo Qiu
BACKGROUND: Propofol is increasingly used during partial support mechanical ventilation such as pressure support ventilation (PSV) in postoperative patients. However, breathing pattern, respiratory drive, and patient-ventilator synchrony are affected by the sedative used and the sedation depth. The present study aimed to evaluate the physiologic effects of varying depths of propofol sedation on respiratory drive and patient-ventilator synchrony during PSV in postoperative patients. METHODS: Eight postoperative patients receiving PSV for <24 h were enrolled...
May 20, 2017: Chinese Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28441238/diaphragm-activation-in-ventilated-patients-using-a-novel-transvenous-phrenic-nerve-pacing-catheter
#2
Steven Reynolds, Adrian Ebner, Tracy Meffen, Viral Thakkar, Matt Gani, Kaity Taylor, Linda Clark, Gautam Sadarangani, Ramasamy Meyyappan, Rodrigo Sandoval, Elizabeth Rohrs, Joaquín A Hoffer
OBJECTIVES: Over 30% of critically ill patients on positive-pressure mechanical ventilation have difficulty weaning from the ventilator, many of whom acquire ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction. Temporary transvenous phrenic nerve pacing using a novel electrode-bearing catheter may provide a means to prevent diaphragm atrophy, to strengthen an atrophied diaphragm, and mitigate the harms of mechanical ventilation. We tested the initial safety, feasibility, and impact on ventilation of this novel approach...
April 22, 2017: Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28366356/comparison-of-effort-of-breathing-for-infants-on-nasal-modes-of-respiratory-support
#3
Asavari Kamerkar, Justin Hotz, Rica Morzov, Christopher J L Newth, Patrick A Ross, Robinder G Khemani
OBJECTIVE: To directly compare effort of breathing between high flow nasal cannula (HFNC), nasal intermittent mechanical ventilation (NIMV), and nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP). STUDY DESIGN: This was a single center prospective cross-over study for patients <6 months in the cardiothoracic or pediatric intensive care unit receiving nasal noninvasive respiratory support after extubation. We measured effort of breathing using esophageal manometry with pressure-rate product (PRP) on all 3 modes...
March 30, 2017: Journal of Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28339316/practical-insight-to-monitor-home-niv-in-copd-patients
#4
Jean-Michel Arnal, Joëlle Texereau, Aude Garnero
Home noninvasive ventilation (NIV) is used in COPD patients with concomitant chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure in order to correct nocturnal hypoventilation and improve sleep quality, quality of life, and survival. Monitoring of home NIV is needed to assess the effectiveness of ventilation and adherence to therapy, resolve potential adverse effects, reinforce patient knowledge, provide maintenance of the equipment, and readjust the ventilator settings according to the changing condition of the patient...
March 24, 2017: COPD
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28267272/effect-of-ventilator-mode-on-patient-ventilator-synchrony-and-work-of-breathing-in-neonatal-pigs
#5
Shayna M Wood, Tracy L Thurman, Shirley J Holt, Shasha Bai, Mark J Heulitt, Sherry E Courtney
BACKGROUND: Patient-ventilator asynchrony can result in increased work of breathing (WOB) and need for increased sedation, as well as respiratory muscle fatigue and prolonged mechanical ventilation. Different ventilator modes may result in varying degrees of asynchrony and WOB. OBJECTIVE: The objectives of this study were to assess the incidence of asynchrony and the effect of asynchrony on WOB in three modes of ventilation: pressure regulated volume control (PRVC), synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation/volume control plus pressure support (SIMV/VC plus PS), and SIMV/PRVC plus PS...
March 7, 2017: Pediatric Pulmonology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28196936/influences-of-duration-of-inspiratory-effort-respiratory-mechanics-and-ventilator-type-on-asynchrony-with-pressure-support-and-proportional-assist-ventilation
#6
Renata S Vasconcelos, Raquel P Sales, Luíz H de P Melo, Liégina S Marinho, Vasco Pd Bastos, Andréa da Nc Nogueira, Juliana C Ferreira, Marcelo A Holanda
BACKGROUND: Pressure support ventilation (PSV) is often associated with patient-ventilator asynchrony. Proportional assist ventilation (PAV) offers inspiratory assistance proportional to patient effort, minimizing patient-ventilator asynchrony. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of respiratory mechanics and patient effort on patient-ventilator asynchrony during PSV and PAV plus (PAV+). METHODS: We used a mechanical lung simulator and studied 3 respiratory mechanics profiles (normal, obstructive, and restrictive), with variations in the duration of inspiratory effort: 0...
February 14, 2017: Respiratory Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28196820/combined-use-of-neurally-adjusted-ventilatory-assist-nava-and-vertical-expandable-prostethic-titanium-rib-veptr-in-a-patient-with-spondylocostal-dysostosis-and-associated-bronchomalacia
#7
Martí Pons-Odena, Alba Verges, Natalia Arza, Francisco José Cambra
Jarcho-Levin syndrome is a rare disorder characterised by defects in vertebral and costal segmentation of varying severity. Respiratory complications are the main cause of death or severe comorbidity due to a restrictive rib cage. A 3 months old infant with Spondylocostal dysostosis and associated bronchomalacia experiencing severe asynchrony during the weaning process is reported. The Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA) mode was used to improve adaptation to mechanical ventilation after Vertical Expandable Prosthetic Titanium Ribs (VEPTRs) were implanted...
February 14, 2017: BMJ Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28149025/comparison-of-patient-ventilator-asynchrony-during-pressure-support-ventilation-and-proportional-assist-ventilation-modes-in-surgical-intensive-care-unit-a-randomized-crossover-study
#8
Parshotam Lal Gautam, Gaganjot Kaur, Sunil Katyal, Ruchi Gupta, Preetveen Sandhu, Nikhil Gautam
BACKGROUND: The patient-ventilator asynchrony is almost observed in all modes of ventilation, and this asynchrony affects lung mechanics adversely resulting in deleterious outcome. Innovations and advances in ventilator technology have been trying to overcome this problem by designing newer modes of ventilation. Pressure support ventilation (PSV) is a commonly used flow-cycled mode where a constant pressure is delivered by ventilator. Proportional assist ventilation (PAV) is a new dynamic inspiratory pressure assistance and is supposed to be better than PSV for synchrony and tolerance, but reports are still controversial...
December 2016: Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28063223/neurally-adjusted-ventilatory-assist-for-infants-under-prolonged-ventilation
#9
Juyoung Lee, Han-Suk Kim, Young Hwa Jung, Chang Won Choi, Yong Hoon Jun
BACKGROUND: Severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia often leads to prolonged mechanical ventilation lasting several months. Cyanotic episodes frequently occur in these patients, necessitating long-term sedation and/or intermittent muscle paralysis. Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) might provide precisely the amount of support that these patients need without sedation. METHODS: We reviewed the medical records of preterm infants who underwent tracheostomy and required mechanical ventilation for >6 months during a period of 6 years...
May 2017: Pediatrics International: Official Journal of the Japan Pediatric Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28052047/mechanical-ventilatory-modes-and-cardioventilatory-phase-synchronization-in-acute-respiratory-failure-patients
#10
Claudio Enrico Mazzucco, Andrea Marchi, Vlasta Bari, Beatrice De Maria, Stefano Guzzetti, Ferdinando Raimondi, Emanuele Catena, Davide Ottolina, Carla Amadio, Silvio Cravero, Tommaso Fossali, Riccardo Colombo, Alberto Porta
Cardioventilatory phase synchronization was studied in ten critically ill patients admitted in intensive care unit (ICU) for acute respiratory failure under two mechanical ventilatory modes: (i) pressure controlled ventilation (PCV); (ii) pressure support ventilation (PSV). The two modalities were administered to the same patient in different times in a random order. Cardioventilatory phase interactions were typified by plotting the relative position of a heartbeat, detected from the electrocardiogram and collected in n groups, within m ventilatory cycles as a function of the progressive cardiac beat number via the synchrogram...
May 2017: Physiological Measurement
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28000205/early-severe-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-what-s-going-on-part-ii-controlled-vs-spontaneous-ventilation
#11
REVIEW
Fabrice Petitjeans, Cyrille Pichot, Marco Ghignone, Luc Quintin
The second part of this overview on early severe ARDS delineates the pros and cons of the following: a) controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV: lowered oxygen consumption and perfect patient-to-ventilator synchrony), to be used during acute cardio-ventilatory distress in order to "buy time" and correct circulatory insufficiency and metabolic defects (acidosis, etc.); b) spontaneous ventilation (SV: improved venous return, lowered intrathoracic pressure, absence of muscle atrophy). Given a stabilized early severe ARDS, as soon as the overall clinical situation improves, spontaneous ventilation will be used with the following stringent conditionalities: upfront circulatory optimization, upright positioning, lowered VO2, lowered acidotic and hypercapnic drives, sedation without ventilatory depression and without lowered muscular tone, as well as high PEEP (titrated on transpulmonary pressure, or as a second best: "trial"-PEEP) with spontaneous ventilation + pressure support (or newer modes of ventilation)...
2016: Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27941478/asynchrony-between-ventilator-flow-and-pressure-waveforms-and-the-capnograph-on-dr%C3%A3-ger-anesthesia-workstations-a-case-report
#12
Mukesh Tripathi, Nilay Tripathi, Mamta Pandey
Modern anesthesia workstations display capnography, flow-time, and pressure-time waveforms in real time. We observed that at certain ventilator settings (10 breaths/min) on Dräger workstations, the expiratory phase of the capnograph overlaps both the inspiratory and the expiratory phases of ventilation. This discrepancy disappears at respiratory rates of 16 breaths/min. This synchronous respiratory monitoring display at respiratory rates 16 breaths/min is not physiologically correct, because it implies a synchronization of waveforms that is not actually present...
March 1, 2017: A & A Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27940767/effective-neurally-adjusted-ventilatory-assist-nava-ventilation-in-a-child-with-jeune-syndrome
#13
Gianluca Cosi, Giulia Genoni, Alice Monzani, Barbara Pilan, Maria Lavrano, Federica Ferrero
Jeune syndrome (asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy) is a rare skeletal dysplasia mainly characterized by dystrophy of the thoracic cage. Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) is a respiratory support in which pressure assistance is provided in proportion to and synchronous with the electrical activity of the diaphragm. We present the case of a 4-month-old infant with asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy and respiratory failure successfully ventilated with NAVA. In this case, NAVA improved patient-ventilator synchrony, reducing endotracheal secretion and gastric overdistention...
November 2016: Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27866528/-effect-of-non-invasive-nava-on-the-patients-with-acute-exacerbation-of-chronic-obstructive-pulmonary-disease
#14
D Q Wang, J Luo, X H Xiong, L H Zhu, W W Zhang
Objective: To observe the effect of non-invasive neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NIV-NAVA) on patient-ventilator synchrony and effect of gas exchange in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease compared with NIV-pressure support ventilation (PSV). Methods: This was a prospective study of 40 patients with AECOPD given 30-min trials of NIV with NIV-PSV group (n=20) and NAVA group (n=20) in random order. Arterial blood gas analysis (ABGs), main asynchrony events and asynchrony index were quantified...
November 15, 2016: Zhonghua Yi Xue za Zhi [Chinese medical journal]
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27854117/treatment-of-neonates-with-respiratory-distress-syndrome-by-proportional-assist-ventilation-plus-synchronized-intermittent-mandatory-ventilation-a-comparison-study
#15
Rong Wu, Zhao F Tian, Xiang Y Kong, Shao D Hua, Jin H Hu, Guo F Zhen
BACKGROUND: The proportion assisted ventilation (PAV) can improve patient-ventilator interaction, reduce the incidence of end-expiratory asynchrony and increase the time of synchrony. PAV could compensate for the leaks by Elastic and resistive unloading and thus is ideal for neonates with uncuffed airways. The aim of this study was to compare the relevant clinical parameters of neonates with respiratory distress syndrome(RDS) who are surported by PAV plus synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation (SIMV) and SIMV...
November 17, 2016: Minerva Pediatrica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27849239/importance-of-the-use-of-protocols-for-the-management-of-analgesia-and-sedation-in-pediatric-intensive-care-unit
#16
REVIEW
Emiliana Motta, Michele Luglio, Artur Figueiredo Delgado, Werther Brunow de Carvalho
Introduction: Analgesia and sedation are essential elements in patient care in the intensive care unit (ICU), in order to promote the control of pain, anxiety and agitation, prevent the loss of devices, accidental extubation, and improve the synchrony of the patient with mechanical ventilation. However, excess of these medications leads to rise in morbidity and mortality. The ideal management will depend on the adoption of clinical and pharmacological measures, guided by scales and protocols...
September 2016: Revista da Associação Médica Brasileira
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27842752/management-of-sedation-and-paralysis
#17
REVIEW
Michael A Fierro, Raquel R Bartz
Sedatives are administered to decrease patient discomfort and agitation during mechanical ventilation and to maintain patient-ventilator synchrony. Titration of infusions and or bolus dosing to maintain light sedation goals according to validated scales is recommended. However, it is important to consider deeper sedation for patients with refractory patient-ventilator dyssynchrony (PVD) to prevent volutrauma and barotrauma. Deep sedation plus muscle relaxants may be required to treat PVD or to reduce oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production...
December 2016: Clinics in Chest Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27842747/patient-ventilator-interactions
#18
REVIEW
Daniel Gilstrap, John Davies
Ventilatory muscle fatigue is a reversible loss of the ability to generate force or velocity of contraction in response to increased elastic and resistive loads. Mechanical ventilation should provide support without imposing additional loads from the ventilator (dys-synchrony). Interactive breaths optimize this relationship but require that patient effort and the ventilator response be synchronous during breath initiation, flow delivery, and termination. Proper delivery considers all 3 phases and uses clinical data, ventilator graphics, and sometimes a trial-and-error approach to optimize patient-ventilator interactions...
December 2016: Clinics in Chest Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27802956/education-on-patient-ventilator-synchrony-clinicians-knowledge-level-and-duration-of-mechanical-ventilation
#19
Donna Lynch-Smith, Carol Lynn Thompson, Rexann G Pickering, Jim Y Wan
BACKGROUND: Improved recognition of patient-ventilator asynchrony may reduce duration of mechanical ventilation. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of education about patient-ventilator synchrony on clinicians' level of knowledge and patients' mean duration of mechanical ventilation. METHODS: A quasi-experimental 1-group pretest-posttest study was performed in a 16-bed intensive care unit. Analysis included 33 clinicians and 97 ventilator patients...
November 2016: American Journal of Critical Care: An Official Publication, American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27798315/detection-of-ventilator-autotriggering-by-an-esophageal-catheter-used-to-monitor-the-neural-input-and-diaphragm-excitation
#20
Harbaksh Sangha, Troy Whitacre
Patient-ventilator synchrony has been the focus of attention in the field of mechanical ventilation for quite some time now. Toward that end, the modern ventilators are equipped with very sensitive pneumatic triggering mechanisms, which allow for minimal wasting of patient effort. The increasingly sensitive pneumatic triggers have the potential to cause autotriggering, where stimuli other than neural signals (eg, cardiac oscillations) can trigger the mechanical breath. Although autotriggering has been well documented in brain-dead patients, its existence is difficult to prove in patients who have the ability to trigger breath through neural diaphragmatic activity...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Intensive Care Medicine
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