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mild traumatic brain injury treatment

Zhihui Yang, Fan Lin, Amanda S Weissman, Emily Jaalouk, Qing-Shan Xue, Kevin K W Wang
Despite the concussion/ mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) being the most frequent occurrence of traumatic brain injury, there is still a lack of knowledge on the injury and its effects. To develop a better understanding of concussions, animals are often used because they provide a controlled, rigorous, and efficient model. Studies have adapted traditional animal models to perform mTBI to stimulate mild injury severity by changing the injury parameters. These models have been used because they can produce morphologically similar brain injuries to the clinical condition and provide a spectrum of injury severities...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
Wei Bu, Huiling Ren, Yunping Deng, Nobel Del Mar, Natalie M Guley, Bob M Moore, Marcia G Honig, Anton Reiner
We have previously reported that mild TBI created by focal left-side cranial blast in mice produces widespread axonal injury, microglial activation, and a variety of functional deficits. We have also shown that these functional deficits are reduced by targeting microglia through their cannabinoid type-2 (CB2) receptors using 2-week daily administration of the CB2 inverse agonist SMM-189. CB2 inverse agonists stabilize the G-protein coupled CB2 receptor in an inactive conformation, leading to increased phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), and thus bias activated microglia from a pro-inflammatory M1 to a pro-healing M2 state...
2016: Frontiers in Neuroscience
Ian H Stanley, Thomas E Joiner, Craig J Bryan
Research has demonstrated a robust link between traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) and suicide risk. Yet, few studies have investigated factors that account for this link. Utilizing a clinical sample of deployed military personnel, this study aimed to examine a serial meditation model of anger and depression in the association of mild TBI and suicide risk. A total of 149 military service members referred for evaluation/treatment of a suspected head injury at a military hospital participated in the present study (92...
October 7, 2016: Journal of Psychiatric Research
Michael W Collins, Anthony P Kontos, David O Okonkwo, Jon Almquist, Julian Bailes, Mark Barisa, Jeffrey Bazarian, O Josh Bloom, David Brody, Robert Cantu, Javier Cardenas, Jay Clugston, Randall Cohen, Ruben Echemendia, R J Elbin, Richard Ellenbogen, Janna Fonseca, Gerard Gioia, Kevin Guskiewicz, Robert Heyer, Gillian Hotz, Grant L Iverson, Barry Jordan, Geoffrey Manley, Joseph Maroon, Thomas McAllister, Michael McCrea, Anne Mucha, Elizabeth Pieroth, Kenneth Podell, Matthew Pombo, Teena Shetty, Allen Sills, Gary Solomon, Danny G Thomas, Tamara C Valovich McLeod, Tony Yates, Ross Zafonte
BACKGROUND: Conventional management for concussion involves prescribed rest and progressive return to activity. Recent evidence challenges this notion and suggests that active approaches may be effective for some patients. Previous concussion consensus statements provide limited guidance regarding active treatment. OBJECTIVE: To describe the current landscape of treatment for concussion and to provide summary agreements related to treatment to assist clinicians in the treatment of concussion...
October 12, 2016: Neurosurgery
Zachary S Bailey, Eric Nilson, John Bates, Adewole Oyalowo, Kevin S Hockey, Sujith Sajja, Chevon Thorpe, Heidi Rogers, Bryce Dunn, Aaron S Frey, Marc J Billings, Christopher A Sholar, Amy Hermundstad, Challa Kumar, Pamela J VandeVord, Beverly A Rzigalinski
Mild traumatic brain injury results in aberrant free radical generation, which is associated with oxidative stress, secondary injury signaling cascades, mitochondrial dysfunction, and poor functional outcome. Pharmacological targeting of free radicals with antioxidants has been examined as an approach for treatment, but has met with limited success. Conventional antioxidants currently available scavenge a single free radical, before they are destroyed in the process. Here, we report for the first time, that a novel regenerative cerium oxide nanoparticle antioxidant reduces neuronal death and calcium dysregulation after in vitro trauma...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
Brandon P Lucke-Wold, Aric F Logsdon, Linda Nguyen, Ahmed Eltanahay, Ryan C Turner, Patrick Bonasso, Chelsea Knotts, Adam Moeck, Joseph C Maroon, Julian E Bailes, Charles L Rosen
Studies using traditional treatment strategies for mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) have produced limited clinical success. Interest in treatment for mild TBI is at an all time high due to its association with the development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy and other neurodegenerative diseases, yet therapeutic options remain limited. Traditional pharmaceutical interventions have failed to transition to the clinic for the treatment of mild TBI. As such, many pre-clinical studies are now implementing non-pharmaceutical therapies for TBI...
October 5, 2016: Nutritional Neuroscience
Angela Maria Amorini, Giacomo Lazzarino, Valentina Di Pietro, Stefano Signoretti, Giuseppe Lazzarino, Antonio Belli, Barbara Tavazzi
In this study, concentrations of free amino acids (FAA) and amino group containing compounds (AGCC) following graded diffuse traumatic brain injury (mild TBI, mTBI; severe TBI, sTBI) were evaluated. After 6, 12, 24, 48 and 120 hr aspartate (Asp), glutamate (Glu), asparagine (Asn), serine (Ser), glutamine (Gln), histidine (His), glycine (Gly), threonine (Thr), citrulline (Cit), arginine (Arg), alanine (Ala), taurine (Tau), γ-aminobutyrate (GABA), tyrosine (Tyr), S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), l-cystathionine (l-Cystat), valine (Val), methionine (Met), tryptophane (Trp), phenylalanine (Phe), isoleucine (Ile), leucine (Leu), ornithine (Orn), lysine (Lys), plus N-acetylaspartate (NAA) were determined in whole brain extracts (n = 6 rats at each time for both TBI levels)...
October 3, 2016: Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine
Sarah L Martindale, Sandra B Morissette, Jared A Rowland, Sara L Dolan
Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine how sleep quality affects cognitive functioning in returning combat veterans after accounting for effects of combat exposure, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) history. Method: This was a cross-sectional assessment study evaluating combat exposure, PTSD, mTBI history, sleep quality, and neuropsychological functioning. One hundred and nine eligible male Iraq/Afghanistan combat veterans completed an assessment consisting of a structured clinical interview, neuropsychological battery, and self-report measures...
October 3, 2016: Neuropsychology
M Szczupak, M E Hoffer, S Murphy, C D Balaban
Traumatic brain injury is an increasingly common public health issue, with the mild variant most clinically relevant for this chapter. Common causes of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) include motor vehicle accidents, athletics, and military training/deployment. Despite a range of clinically available testing platforms, diagnosis of mTBI remains challenging. Symptoms are primarily neurosensory, and include dizziness, hearing problems, headaches, cognitive, and sleep disturbances. Dizziness is nearly universally present in all mTBI patients, and is the easiest symptom to objectify for diagnosis...
2016: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
Frances Corrigan, Alina Arulsamy, Jason Teng, Lyndsey E Collins-Praino
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of disability and death worldwide, affecting as many as 54,000,000-60,000,000 people annually. TBI is associated with significant impairments in brain function, impacting cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and physical functioning. Although much previous research has focused on the impairment immediately following injury, TBI may have much longer-lasting consequences, including neuropsychiatric disorders and cognitive impairment. TBI, even mild brain injury, has also been recognized as a significant risk factor for the later development of dementia and Alzheimer's disease...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
Ricardo E Jorge, Laura Acion, Debora I Burin, Robert G Robinson
Importance: Prevention is more effective than treatment to decrease the burden of significant medical conditions such as depressive disorders, a major cause of disability worldwide. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a candidate for selective strategies to prevent depression given the incidence, prevalence, and functional effect of depression that occurs after TBI. Objective: To assess the efficacy of sertraline treatment in preventing depressive disorders following TBI...
October 1, 2016: JAMA Psychiatry
Jan Johansson, Catharina Nygren de Boussard, Gustaf Öqvist Seimyr, Tony Pansell
BACKGROUND: Visual symptoms and dysfunctions may be a part of the long-term issues following mild traumatic brain injury. These issues may have an impact on near work and reading, and thus affect activities of daily life and the ability to return to work. The purpose of the study was to assess the effect of spectacle treatment on near work-related visual symptoms, visual function and reading performance in patients with persisting symptoms after mild traumatic brain injury. METHODS: Eight patients with persisting symptoms after mild traumatic brain injury and anomalies of binocular function were included...
September 14, 2016: Clinical & Experimental Optometry: Journal of the Australian Optometrical Association
Nasya M Sturdivant, Sean G Smith, Syed F Ali, Jeffrey C Wolchok, Kartik Balachandran
Non-penetrating or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is commonly experienced in accidents, the battlefield and in full-contact sports. Astrocyte cellular edema is one of the major factors that leads to high morbidity post-mTBI. Various studies have reported an upregulation of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), a water channel protein, following brain injury. AZA is an antiepileptic drug that has been shown to inhibit AQP4 expression and in this study we investigate the drug as a therapeutic to mitigate the extent of mTBI induced cellular edema...
2016: Scientific Reports
Hibah O Awwad
Traumatic brain injury (TBI), ranging from mild to severe, almost always elicits an array of behavioral deficits in injured subjects. Some of these TBI-induced behavioral deficits include cognitive and vestibulomotor deficits as well as anxiety and other consequences. Rodent models of TBI have been (and still are) fundamental in establishing many of the pathophysiological mechanisms of TBI. Animal models are also utilized in screening and testing pharmacological effects of potential therapeutic agents for brain injury treatment...
2016: Methods in Molecular Biology
Niklas Marklund
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been named the most complex disease in the most complex organ of the body. It is the most common cause of death and disability in the Western world in people <40 years old and survivors commonly suffer from persisting cognitive deficits, impaired motor function, depression and personality changes. TBI may vary in severity from uniformly fatal to mild injuries with rapidly resolving symptoms and without doubt, it is a markedly heterogeneous disease. Its different subtypes differs in their pathophysiology, treatment options and long-term consequences and to date, there are no pharmacological treatments with proven clinical benefit available to TBI patients...
2016: Methods in Molecular Biology
Cindy Crawford, Lynn Teo, EunMee Yang, Caitlin Isbister, Kevin Berry
OBJECTIVE: This systematic review examines the efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) for traumatic brain injury (TBI) to make evidence-based recommendations for its application and future research. METHODS: A comprehensive search was conducted to identify studies through 2014. Methodological quality was assessed and synthesis and interpretation of relevant data was performed. RESULTS: Twelve randomized trials were included. All mild TBI studies demonstrated minimal bias and no statistically significant differences between HBO2 and sham arms...
September 6, 2016: Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation
Douglas B Cooper, Amy O Bowles, Jan E Kennedy, Glenn Curtiss, Louis M French, David F Tate, Rodney D Vanderploeg
OBJECTIVE: To compare cognitive rehabilitation (CR) interventions for mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) with standard of care management, including psychoeducation and medical care for noncognitive symptoms. SETTING: Military medical center. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 126 service members who received mTBI from 3 to 24 months before baseline evaluation and reported ongoing cognitive difficulties. INTERVENTIONS: Randomized clinical trial with treatment outcomes assessed at baseline, 3-week, 6-week, 12-week, and 18-week follow-ups...
September 6, 2016: Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation
Hongtao Sun, Maohua Zheng, Yanmin Wang, Yunfeng Diao, Wanyong Zhao, Zhengjun Wei
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance and changes of brain tissue partial pressure of oxygen (PbtO2) in the course of mild hypothermia treatment (MHT) for treating severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI). METHODS: There were 68 cases with sTBI undergoing MHT. PbtO2, intracranial pressure (ICP), jugular venous oxygen saturation (SjvO2), and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) were continuously monitored, and clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Glasgow Outcome Scale score...
2016: Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
D Allan Butterfield, Tanea T Reed
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a spontaneous event in which sudden trauma and secondary injury cause brain damage. Symptoms of TBI can range from mild to severe depending on extent of injury. The outcome can span from complete patient recovery to permanent memory loss and neurological decline. Currently, there is no known cure for TBI; however, immediate medical attention after injury is most beneficial for patient recovery. It is a well-established concept that imbalances in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), reactive nitrogen species (RNS), and native antioxidant mechanisms have been shown to increase oxidative stress...
September 2, 2016: Proteomics. Clinical Applications
Chong Chen, Tie-Zhu Ma, Li-Na Wang, Jing-Jing Wang, Yue Tu, Ming-Liang Zhao, Sai Zhang, Hong-Tao Sun, Xiao-Hong Li
Although previous research has demonstrated that traumatic brain injury (TBI) accelerates the proliferation of neural stem cells in dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, most of these newborn cells undergo apoptosis in a traumatic microenvironment. Thus, promoting the long-term survival of newborn cells during neurogenesis is a compelling goal for the treatment of TBI. In this study, we investigated whether mild hypothermia (MHT) therapy, which mitigates the multiple secondary injury cascades of TBI, enhances the survival of newborn cells...
October 29, 2016: Neuroscience
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