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Pediatric palliative care

Zornitza Stark, Sebastian Lunke, Gemma R Brett, Natalie B Tan, Rachel Stapleton, Smitha Kumble, Alison Yeung, Dean G Phelan, Belinda Chong, Miriam Fanjul-Fernandez, Justine E Marum, Matthew Hunter, Anna Jarmolowicz, Yael Prawer, Jessica R Riseley, Matthew Regan, Justine Elliott, Melissa Martyn, Stephanie Best, Tiong Y Tan, Clara L Gaff, Susan M White
PurposeThe purpose of the study was to implement and prospectively evaluate the outcomes of a rapid genomic diagnosis program at two pediatric tertiary centers.MethodsRapid singleton whole-exome sequencing (rWES) was performed in acutely unwell pediatric patients with suspected monogenic disorders. Laboratory and clinical barriers to implementation were addressed through continuous multidisciplinary review of process parameters. Diagnostic and clinical utility and cost-effectiveness of rWES were assessed.ResultsOf 40 enrolled patients, 21 (52...
March 15, 2018: Genetics in Medicine: Official Journal of the American College of Medical Genetics
Marianne Goudreault, Nago Humbert, France Gauvin, Monia Marzouki, Catherine K Beaumier, Dickens St-Vil, Nelson Piché
INTRODUCTION: Pediatric surgeons are often involved in the management of severely or terminally ill patients. However, articles addressing their specific roles in the context of palliative care are almost inexistent. We sought to characterize the involvement of pediatric surgeons caring for children near end of life. METHODS: Chart review of children who had a procedure under general anesthesia within 6months of their death over a five-year period at a tertiary children's hospital (excluding traumas and neonatology cases)...
February 9, 2018: Journal of Pediatric Surgery
Andrea Postier, Kris Catrine, Stacy Remke
Little is known about the role of pediatric palliative care (PPC) programs in providing support for home compassionate extubation (HCE) when families choose to spend their child's end of life at home. Two cases are presented that highlight the ways in which the involvement of PPC teams can help to make the option available, help ensure continuity of family-centered care between hospital and home, and promote the availability of psychosocial support for the child and their entire family, health care team members, and community...
March 7, 2018: Children
Barbara Jones, Jennifer Currin-Mcculloch, Wendy Pelletier, Vicki Sardi-Brown, Peter Brown, Lori Wiener
In 2015, an interdisciplinary group of psychosocial experts developed The Standards of Psychosocial Care for Children with Cancer and Their Families. This paper presents data from a national survey of pediatric oncology social workers and their experiences in delivering psychosocial care to children and families. In total, 107 social workers from 81 cancer institutions participated in a 25-item online survey that mirrored the 15 Standards for Psychosocial Care. Both closed and open-ended questions were included...
April 2018: Social Work in Health Care
Katherine E Nelson, James A Feinstein, Cynthia A Gerhardt, Abby R Rosenberg, Kimberley Widger, Jennifer A Faerber, Chris Feudtner
Given the broad focus of pediatric palliative care (PPC) on the physical, emotional, and spiritual needs of children with potentially life-limiting illnesses and their families, PPC research requires creative methodological approaches. This manuscript, written by experienced PPC researchers, describes issues encountered in our own areas of research and the novel methods we have identified to target them. Specifically, we discuss potential approaches to: assessing symptoms among nonverbal children, evaluating medical interventions, identifying and treating problems related to polypharmacy, addressing missing data in longitudinal studies, evaluating longer-term efficacy of PPC interventions, and monitoring for inequities in PPC service delivery...
February 26, 2018: Children
Christine S Davis, Meghan J Snider, Lynná King, Allison Shukraft, James D Sonda, Laurie Hicks, Lauren Irvin
The death of a child creates especially poignant feelings and extreme stress, distress, and devastation for family members and healthcare providers. In addition, serious or long-term illness forces a reconstruction of our experiences with time and space. In this paper, we report on a long-term ethnographic study of a Pediatric Palliative Care Team (PPCT). Using the concepts of spatiality and temporality; Deleuze's concepts of smooth and striated spaces; Innis's concepts of space and time biases; Foucault's concept of heterotopian space-places with multiple layers of meaning; and a related concept of heterokairoi-moments in time with multiple possibilities-we consider how the PPCT constructs and reconstructs meaning in the midst of chaos, ethical dilemmas, and heartbreaking choices...
February 27, 2018: Health Communication
Michael Rost, Elaine Acheson, Thomas Kühne, Marc Ansari, Nadia Pacurari, Pierluigi Brazzola, Felix Niggli, Bernice S Elger, Tenzin Wangmo
PURPOSE: This study examined the provision of palliative care and related decision-making in Swiss pediatric oncology settings. The aim was to determine if and when children who died from cancer received palliative care, whether there were differences by cancer diagnosis, and inclusion of children in decision-making regarding palliative care. METHODS: Using a standardized data extraction form, a retrospective review of medical records of deceased pediatric patients was conducted...
February 24, 2018: Supportive Care in Cancer: Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer
Ross Drake
Palliative care for children in pediatric hospitals is a vital part of the network of services supporting children with severe illness. This has been recognized, with a trend over the past decade for an increased number of pediatric palliative care (PPC) services established in pediatric hospitals. The inpatient team is in the unique position of influencing the early identification of children and their families, across the age and diagnostic spectrum, which could benefit from palliative care. These services have an opportunity to influence the integration of the palliative approach throughout the hospital, and in so doing, have the capacity to improve many aspects of care, including altering an increasingly futile and burdensome treatment trajectory, and ensuring improved symptom (physical and psychological) management...
February 19, 2018: Children
Harold Siden
A substantial number of children cared for by pediatric palliative care physicians have progressive non-malignant conditions. Some elements of their care overlap with care for children with cancer while other elements, especially prognosis and trajectory, have nuanced differences. This article reviews the population, physical-emotional and social concerns, and trajectory.
February 20, 2018: Children
Emily R Haines, A Corey Frost, Heather L Kane, Franziska S Rokoske
Although many of the 16,000 children in the United States diagnosed who are with cancer each year could benefit from pediatric palliative care, these services remain underused. Evidence regarding the barriers impeding access to comprehensive palliative care is dispersed in the literature, and evidence specific to pediatric oncology remains particularly sparse. The purpose of the current review was to synthesize the existing literature regarding these barriers and the strategies offered to address them. The authors completed a literature search using the PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and Web of Science databases...
February 16, 2018: Cancer
Matthew Stutz, Roy L Kao, Leanna Huard, Jonathan Grotts, Javier Sanz, Mindy K Ross
OBJECTIVES: Our aim in this study was to understand usage patterns of pediatric palliative care (PPC) consultation and associations with end-of-life preparation among pediatric patients who are deceased. METHODS: We reviewed 233 pediatric mortalities. Data extraction from the electronic health record included determination of PPC consultation by using Current Procedural Terminology codes. Diagnoses were identified by International Classification of Disease codes and were classified into categories of life-threatening complex chronic conditions (LT-CCCs)...
March 2018: Hospital Pediatrics
Erica C Kaye, Jonathan Jerkins, Courtney A Gushue, Samantha DeMarsh, April Sykes, Zhaohua Lu, Jennifer M Snaman, Lindsay Blazin, Liza-Marie Johnson, Deena R Levine, R Ray Morrison, Justin N Baker
CONTEXT: Early integration of palliative care (PC) in the management of children with high-risk cancer is widely endorsed by patients, families, clinicians, and national organizations. However, optimal timing for PC consultation is not standardized, and variables that influence timing of PC integration for children with cancer remain unknown. OBJECTIVES: To investigate associations between demographic, disease, treatment, and end-of-life attributes and timing of PC consultation for children with high-risk cancer enrolled on a PC service...
February 7, 2018: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management
Julia E Szymczak, Theodore Schall, Douglas L Hill, Jennifer K Walter, Shefali Parikh, Concetta DiDomenico, Chris Feudtner
CONTEXT: Pediatric palliative care consults for children with cancer often occur late in the course of disease and close to death, when earlier involvement would reduce suffering. The perceptions that pediatric oncology providers hold about the pediatric palliative care service (PPCS) may shape referral patterns. OBJECTIVE: To explore how pediatric oncology providers at one institution perceived the hospital's PPCS and the way these perceptions may influence the timing of consultation...
February 6, 2018: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management
Todd Dalberg, Neil L McNinch, Sarah Friebert
OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to assess pediatric oncology providers' perceptions of palliative care in order to validate previously identified barriers and facilitators to early integration of a pediatric palliative care team (PCT) in the care of children with cancer. METHODS: A 36-question survey based on preliminary, single-institution data was electronically distributed to pediatric oncology physicians, nurse practitioners, nurses, and social workers nationally...
February 8, 2018: Pediatric Blood & Cancer
Terezie Tolar Mosby
Medical nutrition therapy (MNT) in pediatric cancer treatment is essential. The Nutrition Department and the International Outreach Program at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, TN have worked together from 2005 to 2013 to develop and implement a training program for international dietitians working with pediatric oncology patients. During that time, St. Jude hosted 15 dietitians from various countries for this 3-week-long program. The curriculum provided experience in nutrition risk screening, nutrition care process, nutrition for cancer prevention, palliative care, and exposure to nutrition support...
February 7, 2018: Journal of Cancer Education: the Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Education
Brian S Carter
The application of palliative and hospice care to newborns in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) has been evident for over 30 years. This article addresses the history, current considerations, and anticipated future needs for palliative and hospice care in the NICU, and is based on recent literature review. Neonatologists have long managed the entirety of many newborns' short lives, given the relatively high mortality rates associated with prematurity and birth defects, but their ability or willingness to comprehensively address of the continuum of interdisciplinary palliative, end of life, and bereavement care has varied widely...
February 7, 2018: Children
Emily Morell Balkin, Lynn A Sleeper, James N Kirkpatrick, Keith M Swetz, Mary Katherine Coggins, Joanne Wolfe, Elizabeth D Blume
BACKGROUND: While the importance of pediatric palliative care (PPC) for children with life-threatening illness is increasingly recognized, little is known about physicians' attitudes toward palliative care for children with heart disease. OBJECTIVE: To compare the perspectives of PPC physicians and pediatric cardiologists regarding palliative care in pediatric heart disease. DESIGN: Cross-sectional web-based surveys. RESULTS: Responses from 183 pediatric cardiologists were compared to those of 49 PPC physicians (response rates 31% [183/589] and 28% [49/175], respectively)...
February 7, 2018: Journal of Palliative Medicine
Michelle Grunauer, Caley Mikesell
It is estimated that 6.3 million children who die annually need pediatric palliative care (PPC) and that only about 10% of them receive the attention they need because about 98% of them live in under-resourced settings where PPC is not accessible. The consultative model and the integrated model of care (IMOC) are the most common strategies used to make PPC available to critically ill children. In the consultative model, the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) team, the patient, or their family must request a palliative care (PC) consultation with the external PC team for a PICU patient to be evaluated for special care needs...
2018: Frontiers in Pediatrics
Felix Neunhoeffer, Michael Hofbeck, Martin Ulrich Schuhmann, Jörg Fuchs, Christian Schlensak, Martin Esslinger, Ines Gerbig, Vanya Icheva, Ellen Heimberg, Matthias Kumpf, Jörg Michel
OBJECTIVE: Although infants following major surgery frequently require RBC transfusions, there is still controversy concerning the best definition for requirement of transfusion in the individual patient. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of RBC transfusion on cerebral oxygen metabolism in noncardiac and cardiac postsurgical infants. DESIGN: Prospective observational cohort study. SETTING: Pediatric critical care unit of a tertiary referral center...
February 5, 2018: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine
Samuel M Kase, Elisha D Waldman, Andrea S Weintraub
OBJECTIVE: Compassion fatigue (CF) is secondary traumatic distress experienced by providers from contact with patients' suffering. Burnout (BO) is job-related distress resulting from uncontrollable workplace factors that manifest in career dissatisfaction. Compassion satisfaction (CS) is emotional fulfillment derived from caring for others. The literature on BO in healthcare providers is extensive, whereas CF and CS have not been comprehensively studied. Because of ongoing exposure to patient and family distress, pediatric palliative care (PPC) providers may be at particular risk for CF...
February 5, 2018: Palliative & Supportive Care
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