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Intergenerational transmission

Laura R Stroud, George D Papandonatos, Stephanie H Parade, Amy L Salisbury, Maureen G Phipps, Barry M Lester, James F Padbury, Carmen J Marsit
OBJECTIVES: Extending prior studies of prenatal adversity and depressive symptoms, we tested associations between maternal prenatal major depressive disorder (MDD) and infant cortisol regulation. Based on prior findings by our group, we also tested placenta glucocorticoid (HSD11B2 methylation) and serotonin (SLC6A4 gene expression) signaling as moderators of links between prenatal MDD and infant cortisol. METHODS: Participants were 153 mother-infant pairs from a low-income, diverse sample (M [SD] age = 26[6] years)...
October 19, 2016: Psychosomatic Medicine
Peter A Bos
Variation in the quality of parental care has a tremendous impact on a child's social-emotional development. Research investigating the predictors of this variability in human caregiving behavior has mostly focused on learning mechanisms. Evidence is currently accumulating for the complementary underlying role of steroid hormones and neuropeptides. An overview is provided of the hormones and neuropeptides relevant for human caregiving behavior. Then the developmental factors are described that stimulate variability in sensitivity to these hormones and neuropeptides, which may result in variability in the behavioral repertoire of caregiving...
October 20, 2016: Development and Psychopathology
Hanna Gustafsson, Colleen Doyle, Michelle Gilchrist, Elizabeth Werner, Catherine Monk
The consequences of childhood maltreatment are profound and long lasting. Not only does the victim of abuse suffer as a child, but there is mounting evidence that a history of maltreatment places the next generation at risk for significant psychopathology. Research identifies postnatal factors as affecting this intergenerational transmission of trauma. However, emerging evidence suggests that part of this risk may be transmitted before birth, passed on via abuse-related alterations in the in utero environment that are as yet largely unidentified...
October 20, 2016: Development and Psychopathology
Sheila E Crowell, Erin A Kaufman
Self-inflicted injury (SII) is a continuum of intentionally self-destructive behaviors, including nonsuicidal self-injuries, suicide attempts, and death by suicide. These behaviors are among the most pressing yet perplexing clinical problems, affecting males and females of every race, ethnicity, culture, socioeconomic status, and nearly every age. The complexity of these behaviors has spurred an immense literature documenting risk and vulnerability factors ranging from individual to societal levels of analysis...
November 2016: Development and Psychopathology
Gadi Zerach, Yafit Levin, Roy Aloni, Zahava Solomon
Objectives: The aversive, long-term toll of war captivity and fathers' combat-induced posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms (PTSS) on adult offspring's mental health has been recently exemplified. However, studies that have examined the implication of PTSS of both fathers and mothers in the intergenerational transmission of trauma to offspring are still lacking. This prospective study assessed the unique and combined effects of former prisoners of war (ex-POWs) fathers' and mothers' PTSS in adult offspring's PTSS...
October 6, 2016: Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice and Policy
L Wang, C Fan, T Tao, W Gao
BACKGROUND: Few studies have been conducted in people of Asian descent that have reported to demonstrate the distinct developmental trends in good self-control and poor control. To fill this gap, we conducted a national cross-sectional survey among adolescents and young adults in China to further clarify the age and gender differences in self-control from a dual-systems perspective. METHODS: A total of 2910 adolescents (female, n = 1698) and their parents from five different provinces in China were surveyed using the Dual-Modes of Self-Control Scale (DMSC-S) and the Parents' Perceived Self-Control Scale...
October 2, 2016: Child: Care, Health and Development
Andrée-Anne Bouvette-Turcot, Eva Unternaehrer, Hélène Gaudreau, John E Lydon, Meir Steiner, Michael J Meaney
BACKGROUND: We examined the interactive effects of maternal childhood adversity and later adulthood depression on subsequent socioeconomic status (SES). METHODS: Our community sample ranged from 230 to 243 mothers (across measures) drawn from a prospective, longitudinal cohort study. Maternal childhood adversity scores were derived using an integrated measure derived from the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) and the Parental Bonding Index (PBI). Maternal depression was measured in the prenatal period with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D)...
August 16, 2016: Journal of Affective Disorders
Cristina Dos Santos Mesquita, Ângela da Costa Maia
A history of victimization has been linked to the latter development of emotional distress. However, not all victims develop emotional distress in response to victimization, emphasizing the need to identify mediators that can guide intervention, as well as moderators to more targeted preventive actions. Within a developmental psychology framework, we aimed to test two models: (a) the role of adult attachment as a mediator in the relationship between victimization and emotional distress, and (b) the role of household dysfunctions as moderators in the relationship between victimization and emotional distress, in psychiatric patients...
September 21, 2016: Journal of Interpersonal Violence
Cindy C Sangalang, Cindy Vang
Although a robust literature describes the intergenerational effects of traumatic experiences in various populations, evidence specific to refugee families is scattered and contains wide variations in approaches for examining intergenerational trauma. Using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) criteria, the purpose of this systematic review was to describe the methodologies and findings of peer-reviewed literature regarding intergenerational trauma in refugee families...
September 22, 2016: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Eva Tedgård, Maria Råstam
OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether women raised in a family with substance abuse constitute a particularly vulnerable group of patients in an infant psychiatry setting and to identify the risk factors of suspected parental malfunctioning in women referred to treatment in an infant and toddler intervention program. BACKGROUND: A history of family substance abuse can severely disrupt the caretaking abilities of parents in ways that can have far-reaching consequences, and children growing up with insufficient parental care may incorporate this deficiency into their own parental behavior...
2016: SpringerPlus
Mevlude Akbulut-Yuksel, Adriana D Kugler
It is well known that a substantial part of income and education is passed on from parents to children, generating substantial persistence in socioeconomic status across generations. In this paper, we examine whether another form of human capital, health, is also largely transmitted from generation to generation. Using data from the NLSY, we first present new evidence on intergenerational transmission of health outcomes in the U.S., including weight, height, the body mass index (BMI), asthma and depression for both natives and immigrants...
September 6, 2016: Economics and Human Biology
Owen Thompson
Researchers have found strong linkages between parent and child health, but the mechanisms underlying intergenerational health transmission are not well understood. This paper investigates how the importance of genetic health transmission mechanisms varies by environmental conditions in the case of pediatric asthma, the single most common chronic health condition among American children. Using a sample that includes approximately 2000 adoptees and a large number of similar biological families, I find that the relative importance of genetic transmission differs strongly by socioeconomic status (SES)...
September 15, 2016: Health Economics
Shelly Nicolai, Gadi Zerach, Zahava Solomon
OBJECTIVES: This prospective study aims to assess the role of fathers' posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms (PTSS), the course of these symptoms over the years, and the relationship between these symptoms and their adult offspring's own PTSS and level of differentiation of self. METHOD: A sample of 123 Israeli father-child dyads (79 ex-prisoners of war [ex-POWs] dyads and a comparison group of 44 veterans' dyads) completed self-report measures. The fathers participated in 2 waves of measurements (1991 and 2008), while the offspring took part in 2013-2014...
September 13, 2016: Journal of Clinical Psychology
Tiffany C Ho, Stephan J Sanders, Ian H Gotlib, Fumiko Hoeft
Neuroscientists are increasingly using advanced neuroimaging methods to elucidate the intergenerational transmission of human brain circuitry. This new line of work promises to shed light on the ontogeny of complex behavioral traits, including psychiatric disorders, and possible mechanisms of transmission. Here we highlight recent intergenerational neuroimaging studies and provide recommendations for future work.
October 2016: Trends in Neurosciences
John H Riskind, Claudio Sica, Gioia Bottesi, Marta Ghisi, Todd B Kashdan
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Given that anxiety runs in families, it is critical to understand the cognitive factors that may be responsible for this intergenerational transmission. The present study offers a first step by exploring the link between mother and father tendencies to view potentially threatening situations as rapidly escalating toward dreaded outcomes (i.e., looming cognitive style) and the emotional disturbances and looming cognitive styles of their adult offspring. METHODS: We assessed cognitive vulnerabilities, anxiety, and depressive symptoms in a non-clinical sample (N = 382) of Italian college students and their parents...
August 24, 2016: Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry
Timothy J Classen, Owen Thompson
This paper compares the strength of intergenerational transmission of body mass index (BMI) and obesity in a sample of adoptees relative to a matched sample of biological children with similar observable characteristics. We find that BMI and obesity are strongly correlated among biological parent-child pairs, but there are no significant intergenerational associations in these health traits among adoptive parent-child pairs. The intergenerational elasticity of BMI for children to their parents is 0.2 in the matched biological sample, but indistinguishable from zero for adopted children with a standard error more than three times as large as the coefficient...
August 23, 2016: Economics and Human Biology
Njeri Kagotho, Alicia Bunger, Kristen Wagner
BACKGROUND: Problems with misallocation and redirection of critical resources and benefits intended for PLHIV are not uncommon in Kenya. This study explores corruption in Kenya's HIV response system and the implications for health outcomes from the perspective of people living with HIV (PLHIV). Although they might not be directly responsible for health care fund management, PLHIV and their advocacy efforts have been central to the development of HIV system response and they have a vested interest in ensuring proper governance...
2016: BMC Health Services Research
Emily J Braham, Melissa E Libertus
Although growing evidence suggests a link between children's math skills and their ability to estimate numerical quantities using the approximate number system (ANS), little is known about the sources underlying individual differences in ANS acuity and their relation with specific mathematical skills. To examine the role of intergenerational transmission of these abilities from parents to children, the current study assessed the ANS acuities and math abilities of 54 children (5-8 years old) and their parents, as well as parents' expectations about children's math skills...
August 6, 2016: Developmental Science
Erika M Manczak, Deanna Williams, Edith Chen
Whereas previous research on environmental factors implicated in the intergenerational transmission of depression has tended to focus on the role of parenting quality (e.g., harshness), the current study sought to assess whether structural aspects of families may contribute to depression-relevant affective and immune processes in youths. Specifically, the present study examined the role of family routines in linking parental depressive symptoms to youth emotion regulation, a depression-relevant marker of low-grade inflammation, and depressive symptoms in youths...
July 18, 2016: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology
Corinna Reck, Nora Nonnenmacher, Anna-Lena Zietlow
BACKGROUND: Maternal depression and anxiety disorders are risk factors for the development of internalizing disorders in offspring. Maternal attachment has been discussed as one factor accounting for transmission. The aim of this study was to investigate child internalizing behavior at preschool age on a symptomatic and behavioral level and possible links to maternal mental health over time and maternal attachment style insecurity in a sample of postpartum depressed and anxious mothers...
July 12, 2016: Psychopathology
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