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Angiogenic factors kidney pregnancy

Frédéric Sergent, Pascale Hoffmann, Sophie Brouillet, Vanessa Garnier, Aude Salomon, Padma Murthi, Mohamed Benharouga, Jean-Jacques Feige, Nadia Alfaidy
Pregnancy-induced hypertension diseases are classified as gestational hypertension, preeclampsia, or eclampsia. The mechanisms of their development and prediction are still to be discovered. Endocrine gland-derived vascular endothelial growth factor (EG-VEGF) is an angiogenic factor secreted by the placenta during the first trimester of human pregnancy that was shown to control trophoblast invasion, to be upregulated by hypoxia, and to be abnormally elevated in pathological pregnancies complicated with preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction...
July 2016: Hypertension
Ayub Akbari, Michelle Hladunewich, Kevin Burns, Felipe Moretti, Rima Abou Arkoub, Pierre Brown, Swapnil Hiremath
BACKGROUND: Pregnancy in patients on chronic hemodialysis therapy, though unlikely, does happen rarely. Intensive hemodialysis is thought to offer a better survival advantage to the unborn child. Circulating angiogenic factors are helpful for prognostication of pregnant patients with chronic kidney disease who are not on dialysis. Data on their utilization in dialysis patients, however, are limited. CASE PRESENTATION: We report the case of a patient with a history of interstitial nephritis who had a kidney transplant that failed after 8 years due to membranous nephropathy...
2016: Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease
Frank T Spradley, Ana C Palei, Joey P Granger
Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-specific disorder typically presenting as new-onset hypertension and proteinuria. While numerous epidemiological studies have demonstrated that obesity increases the risk of PE, the mechanisms have yet to be fully elucidated. Growing evidence from animal and human studies implicate placental ischemia in the etiology of this maternal syndrome. It is thought that placental ischemia is brought about by dysfunctional cytotrophoblast migration and invasion into the uterus and subsequent lack of spiral arteriole widening and placental perfusion...
December 1, 2015: American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology
B K Campbell, J Hernandez-Medrano, V Onions, C Pincott-Allen, F Aljaser, J Fisher, A S McNeilly, R Webb, H M Picton
STUDY QUESTION: Is it possible to restore ovarian function and natural fertility following the cryopreservation and autotransplantation of whole ovaries, complete with vascular pedicle, in adult females from a large monovulatory animal model species (i.e. sheep)? SUMMARY ANSWER: Full (100%) restoration of acute ovarian function and high rates of natural fertility (pregnancy rate 64%; live birth rate 29%), with multiple live births, were obtained following whole ovary cryopreservation and autotransplantation (WOCP&TP) of adult sheep ovaries utilizing optimized cryopreservation and post-operative anti-coagulant regimes...
August 2014: Human Reproduction
B Marinov, V Manolov, V Vasilev, I Andonova
Preeclampsia (PE) is characterized with hypertension and proteinuria after 20 gestational weeks and is the major reason for maternal and fetal mortality during pregnancy. Etiology of PE is still unclear. Cliniical manifestation is connected to high levels of circulated anti-angiogenic proteins such as soluble Fms-,like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt1) and soluble endolgin (sEng). Furthermore PE leads to low serum levels of Placental growth factor (PIGF). The change of these serum levels appears before clinical manifestation, which makes them useful for screening of pregnant women with high risk of PE...
2013: Akusherstvo i Ginekologii︠a︡
Tom Cornelis, Marc Spaanderman, Charles Beerenhout, Frank H Perschel, Stefan Verlohren, Casper G Schalkwijk, Frank M van der Sande, Jeroen P Kooman, Michelle Hladunewich
We report on a 21-year-old pregnant patient with IgA nephropathy who was initiated on intensive hemodialysis (8 hours of hemodialysis 3 times a week) at a gestational age of 26 weeks on the basis of worsening kidney function resulting in rapidly progressive fatigue and difficulties in metabolic control. Throughout the pregnancy, and while on intensive hemodialysis, 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure control was within the target, and results of weekly 24-hour measurement of central hemodynamics and pulse wave velocity, and of serial levels of circulating (anti-)angiogenic factors were comparable to normal pregnancies...
October 2013: Hemodialysis International
Alfredo Leaños-Miranda, Inova Campos-Galicia, Karla Leticia Ramírez-Valenzuela, Zarela Lizbeth Chinolla-Arellano, Irma Isordia-Salas
Preeclampsia is characterized by an imbalance in angiogenic factors. Urinary prolactin (PRL) levels and its antiangiogenic PRL fragments have been associated with disease severity. In this study, we assessed whether these biomarkers are associated with an increased risk of adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes in preeclamptic women. We studied 501 women with preeclampsia attended at a tertiary care hospital. Serum concentrations of soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1), placental growth factor (PlGF), and soluble endoglin (sEng), as well as urinary PRL levels, were measured by enzymed-linked immunosorbent assay...
May 2013: Hypertension
Christopher T Banek, Ashley J Bauer, Karen M Needham, Hans C Dreyer, Jeffrey S Gilbert
Previous studies suggest restoration of angiogenic balance can lower blood pressure and improve vascular endothelium function in models of preeclampsia. Our laboratory has recently reported exercise training mitigates hypertension in an animal model of preeclampsia, but the mechanisms are unknown. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is stimulated during exercise and has been shown to increase expression of VEGF. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether AICAR (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-3-ribonucleoside), a potent AMPK stimulator, would increase circulating VEGF, improve angiogenic potential, decrease oxidative stress, and abrogate placental ischemia-induced hypertension...
April 15, 2013: American Journal of Physiology. Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Anne Marijn van der Graaf, Tsjitske J Toering, Marijke M Faas, A Titia Lely
Complicating up to 8% of pregnancies, preeclampsia is the most common glomerular disease worldwide and remains a leading cause of infant and maternal morbidity and mortality. Although the exact pathogenesis of this syndrome of hypertension and proteinuria is still incomplete, a consistent line of evidence has identified an imbalance of proangiogenic and anti-angiogenic proteins as a key factor in the development of preeclampsia. Furthermore, more attention has been recently addressed to the renin-angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS), to provide understanding on the hypertension of preeclampsia...
October 2012: Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation
Jeffrey S Gilbert, Christopher T Banek, Ashley J Bauer, Anne Gingery, Karen Needham
An imbalance between proangiogenic (vascular endothelial growth factor) and antiangiogenic (soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1) factors plays an important role in hypertension associated with reduced uteroplacental perfusion (RUPP). Exercise has been shown to stimulate proangiogenic factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, in both the pregnant and nonpregnant state; thus, we hypothesized that exercise training would attenuate both angiogenic imbalance and hypertension attributed to RUPP. Four groups of animals were studied, RUPP and normal pregnant controls and normal pregnant and RUPP+exercise training...
December 2012: Hypertension
Elosha Eiland, Chike Nzerue, Marquetta Faulkner
Preeclampsia is a common complication of pregnancy associated with high maternal morbidity and mortality and intrauterine fetal growth restriction. There is extensive evidence that the reduction of uteroplacental blood flow in this syndrome results from the toxic combination of hypoxia, imbalance of angiogenic and antiangiogenic factors, inflammation, and deranged immunity. Women treated for preeclampsia also have an increased risk for cardiovascular and renal disease. At present it is unclear if the increased cardiovascular and renal disease risks are due to residual and or progressive effects of endothelial damage from the preeclampsia or from shared risk factors between preeclampsia and cardiac disease...
2012: Journal of Pregnancy
Hisashi Masuyama, Etsuko Nobumoto, Naoki Okimoto, Seiji Inoue, Tomonori Segawa, Yuji Hiramatsu
AIM: To evaluate whether pregnant women with chronic kidney disease (CKD) adapt poorly to increases in renal blood flow. This can exacerbate renal function and impair perinatal outcome, as there is a major interplay between CKD and preeclampsia (PE). METHODS: We analyzed the outcomes of 90 pregnant women with preexisting CKD. The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was measured along with the levels of angiogenic factors, soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt-1) and placental growth factor, which might act in the pathophysiology of PE...
2012: Gynecologic and Obstetric Investigation
Christopher T Banek, Ashley J Bauer, Anne Gingery, Jeffrey S Gilbert
Increased uterine artery resistance and angiogenic imbalance characterized by increased soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) and decreased free vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are often associated with placental insufficiency and preeclampsia but not synonymous with hypertension. We hypothesized chronic reductions in utero-placental perfusion (RUPP) for 5 days (d) during either mid- (d12-d17) or late (d14-d19) gestation would have disparate effects on plasma sFlt-1 and VEGF levels and blood pressure...
September 15, 2012: American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Gh Gluhovschi, A Gluhovschi, Ligia Petrica, D Anastasiu, Cristina Gluhovschi, Silvia Velciov
Hypertension is in 85 to 90% of cases of unknown etiology, in spite of efforts undertaken by modern medicine to elucidate it. Numerous experimental studies were conducted in order to explain the pathogeny of this disease. Recent observations revealed that during therapy with anti-VEGF medication,used in treating different forms of cancer, hypertension and proteinuria occur, and at kidney level endothelial injuries appear similar to pregnancy-related hypertension. Antiangiogenic factors, such as sFlt-1, are produced during pregnancy-induced hypertension, especially in preeclampsia...
January 2012: Romanian Journal of Internal Medicine, Revue Roumaine de Médecine Interne
Sarosh Rana, Michele R Hacker, Anna Merport Modest, Saira Salahuddin, Kee-Hak Lim, Stefan Verlohren, Frank H Perschel, S Ananth Karumanchi
To evaluate whether angiogenic factor levels correlate with preeclampsia-related adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes in women with twin pregnancy, we studied 79 women with suspected preeclampsia in the 3rd trimester. Antiangiogenic soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) and proangiogenic placental growth factor (PlGF) were measured at presentation on an automated platform. An adverse outcome was defined as hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets syndrome; disseminated intravascular coagulation; abruption; pulmonary edema; cerebral hemorrhage; maternal, fetal, and neonatal death; eclampsia; acute renal failure; small for gestational age; and indicated delivery...
August 2012: Hypertension
Akira Nagai, Toshiyuki Sado, Katsuhiko Naruse, Taketoshi Noguchi, Shoji Haruta, Shozo Yoshida, Yasuhito Tanase, Taihei Tsunemi, Hiroshi Kobayashi
PROBLEM: Preeclampsia, a pregnancy-related hypertensive disorder, is one of the leading causes of fetal and maternal death globally. Angiogenic factors including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are involved in the formation of new blood vessels required for placental development and function. The hallmark of preeclampsia is similar to the toxicities related to antiangiogenesis therapy. VEGF inhibitors or antagonists promote vasoconstriction, hypertension and proteinuria. VEGF plays a role in attenuating hypertension and improving kidney damage in an animal model; however, the mechanisms underlying this effect remain poorly defined...
2012: Gynecologic and Obstetric Investigation
U D Anderson, M G Olsson, K H Kristensen, B Åkerström, S R Hansson
Worldwide the prevalence of preeclampsia (PE) ranges from 3 to 8% of pregnancies. 8.5 million cases are reported yearly, but this is probably an underestimate due to the lack of proper diagnosis. PE is the most common cause of fetal and maternal death and yet no specific treatment is available. Reliable biochemical markers for prediction and diagnosis of PE would have a great impact on maternal health and several have been suggested. This review describes PE biochemical markers in general and first trimester PE biochemical markers specifically...
February 2012: Placenta
Genevieve Eastabrook, Mark Brown, Ian Sargent
Pre-eclampsia is a multisystem disorder with profound implications for both mother and fetus. Its origins lie in the earliest stages of pregnancy. Abnormal interactions between fetal trophoblast and maternal decidua, including the cells of the maternal immune system, lead to inadequate placental invasion and maternal vascular remodelling. However, abnormal placentation is only one step in the cascade of events that ultimately result in maternal organ dysfunction. Pre-existing maternal conditions predisposing to inflammation and vascular pathology, fetal factors, including multiple gestations and macrosomia, and environmental exposures, including infection, may contribute to the release of placental substances, including anti-angiogenic molecules, into the maternal circulation...
August 2011: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology
Tom Cornelis, Ayodele Odutayo, Johannes Keunen, Michelle Hladunewich
Complicating up to 8% of pregnancies, preeclampsia is, in fact, the most common glomerular disease worldwide. In this article, we review the effect of normal pregnancy on the kidney as well as the role of the kidney in preeclampsia. We discuss blood pressure in pregnancy and preeclampsia, followed by the physiology of hyperfiltration in normal pregnancy as well as the pathophysiology of hypofiltration and proteinuria in preeclampsia. Recent studies have suggested that the clinical syndrome of preeclampsia, which recovers rapidly after delivery of the placenta, is caused by impaired vascular endothelial growth factor signaling that disturbs the status of vascular dilatation as well as the symbiosis between the glomerular endothelium and the podocytes...
January 2011: Seminars in Nephrology
Neroli Sunderland, Annemarie Hennessy, Angela Makris
The cardinal features of human pre-eclampsia, hypertension and proteinuria, are mimicked in animal models. Increasingly, the accuracy of inducing 'pure' systemic endothelial dysfunction is regarded as critical in differentiating mechanisms of pre-eclampsia from other conditions which induce hypertension (e.g. glomerulonephritis, renal denervation or manipulation of the renin-angiotensin system). A recent study in baboons has identified the timing of induction of maternal endothelial damage after acute uteroplacental ischaemia (UPI)...
June 2011: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology: AJRI
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