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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28104494/thoughts-on-interactions-between-pgrmc1-and-diverse-attested-and-potential-hydrophobic-ligands
#1
REVIEW
Michael A Cahill, Amy E Medlock
Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1 (PGRMC1) is located in many different subcellular locations with many different attested and probably location-specific functions. PGRMC1 was recently identified in the mitochondrial outer membrane where it interacts with ferrochelatase, the last enzyme in the heme synthetic pathway. It has been proposed that PGRMC1 may act as a chaperone to shuttle newly synthesized heme from the mitochondrion to cytochrome P450 (cyP450) enzymes. Here we consider potential roles that PGRMC1 may play in transferring heme, and other small hydrophobic ligands such as cholesterol and steroids, between the hydrophobic compartment of the membrane lipid bilayer interior to aqueous proteins, and perhaps to the membranes of other organelles...
January 16, 2017: Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28100637/a-zip3-like-protein-plays-a-role-in-crossover-formation-in-the-sc-less-meiosis-of-the-protist-tetrahymena
#2
Anura Shodhan, Kensuke Kataoka, Kazufumi Mochizuki, Maria Novatchkova, Josef Loidl
When programmed meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) undergo recombinational repair, genetic crossovers (COs) may be formed. A certain level of these are required for the faithful segregation of chromosomes, but the majority of DSBs are processed toward a safer alternative, namely non-crossovers (NCOs), via non-reciprocal DNA exchange. At the crossroads between these two DSB fates are the Msh4-Msh5 (MutSγ) complex, which stabilizes CO-destined recombination intermediates, and members of the Zip3/RNF212 family of RING finger proteins, which in turn stabilize MutSγ...
January 18, 2017: Molecular Biology of the Cell
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28097055/comprehensive-transcriptome-analysis-provides-new-insights-into-nutritional-strategies-and-phylogenetic-relationships-of-chrysophytes
#3
Daniela Beisser, Nadine Graupner, Christina Bock, Sabina Wodniok, Lars Grossmann, Matthijs Vos, Bernd Sures, Sven Rahmann, Jens Boenigk
BACKGROUND: Chrysophytes are protist model species in ecology and ecophysiology and important grazers of bacteria-sized microorganisms and primary producers. However, they have not yet been investigated in detail at the molecular level, and no genomic and only little transcriptomic information is available. Chrysophytes exhibit different trophic modes: while phototrophic chrysophytes perform only photosynthesis, mixotrophs can gain carbon from bacterial food as well as from photosynthesis, and heterotrophs solely feed on bacteria-sized microorganisms...
2017: PeerJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28096380/in-situ-structure-of-trypanosomal-atp-synthase-dimer-reveals-a-unique-arrangement-of-catalytic-subunits
#4
Alexander W Mühleip, Caroline E Dewar, Achim Schnaufer, Werner Kühlbrandt, Karen M Davies
We used electron cryotomography and subtomogram averaging to determine the in situ structures of mitochondrial ATP synthase dimers from two organisms belonging to the phylum euglenozoa: Trypanosoma brucei, a lethal human parasite, and Euglena gracilis, a photosynthetic protist. At a resolution of 32.5 Å and 27.5 Å, respectively, the two structures clearly exhibit a noncanonical F1 head, in which the catalytic (αβ)3 assembly forms a triangular pyramid rather than the pseudo-sixfold ring arrangement typical of all other ATP synthases investigated so far...
January 17, 2017: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28092806/life-cycle-ultrastructure-and-phylogeny-of-parvilucifera-corolla-sp-nov-alveolata-perkinsozoa-a-parasitoid-of-dinoflagellates
#5
Albert Reñé, Elisabet Alacid, Rosa Isabel Figueroa, Francisco Rodríguez, Esther Garcés
Recent studies of marine protists have revealed parasites to be key components of marine communities. Here we describe a new species of the parasitoid genus Parvilucifera that was observed infecting the dinoflagellate Durinskia baltica in salt marshes of the Catalan coast (NW Mediterranean). In parallel, the same species was detected after the incubation of seawater from the Canary Islands (Lanzarote, NE Atlantic). The successful isolation of strains from both localities allowed description of the life cycle, ultrastructure, and phylogeny of the species...
December 13, 2016: European Journal of Protistology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28090405/transcriptomic-analysis-of-diplomonad-parasites-reveals-a-trans-spliced-intron-in-a-helicase-gene-in-giardia
#6
Scott William Roy
BACKGROUND: The mechanisms by which DNA sequences are expressed is the central preoccupation of molecular genetics. Recently, ourselves and others reported that in the diplomonad protist Giardia lamblia, the coding regions of several mRNAs are produced by ligation of independent RNA species expressed from distinct genomic loci. Such trans-splicing of introns was found to affect nearly as many genes in this organism as does classical cis-splicing of introns. These findings raised questions about the incidence of intron trans-splicing both across the G...
2017: PeerJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28088729/new-insights-into-aox2-transcriptional-regulation-in-chlamydomonas-reinhardtii
#7
Mariya Ostroukhova, Zhanneta Zalutskaya, Elena Ermilova
A feature of the mitochondrial electron transport chain in plants, some protists and many fungi is the presence of two terminal oxidases, the energy-conserving cytochrome oxidase and another termed alternative oxidase (AOX). AOX branches from the main respiratory chain, directly coupling the oxidation of ubiquinol with reduction of oxygen to water. The AOX genes can be divided into two discrete subfamilies, AOX1 and AOX2. Although AOX has been proposed to play essential roles in stress tolerance of organisms, the role of subfamily AOX2 is largely unknown...
December 13, 2016: European Journal of Protistology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28088334/subtype-identification-of-human-blastocystis-spp-isolated-from-lao-people-s-democratic-republic
#8
Oranuch Sanpool, Sakhone Laymanivong, Tongjit Thanchomnang, Rutchanee Rodpai, Lakkhana Sadaow, Issarapong Phosuk, Wanchai Maleewong, Pewpan M Intapan
Blastocystis sp. is the most common protist found in the intestinal tract of humans and animals. Blastocystis subtypes (STs) are classified based on the molecular phylogeny of the small subunit rRNA gene (SSU rDNA). At least 17 Blastocystis STs have been reported and, of these, STs 1-9 have been found in humans. This study revealed the presence of human Blastocystis STs in Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR). Fecal samples were collected from apparently healthy people from the central province of Khammouane and the southern province of Champasak...
January 11, 2017: Acta Tropica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28079476/mimiviruses-and-the-human-interferon-system-viral-evasion-of-classical-antiviral-activities-but-inhibition-by-a-novel-interferon-%C3%AE-regulated-immunomodulatory-pathway
#9
Gabriel Magno de Freitas Almeida, Lorena C Ferreira Silva, Philippe Colson, Jonatas Santos Abrahao
In this review we discuss the role of mimiviruses as potential human pathogens focusing on clinical and evolutionary evidence. We also propose a novel antiviral immunomodulatory pathway controlled by interferon-β (IFN-β) and mediated by immune-responsive gene 1 (IRG1) and itaconic acid, its product. Acanthamoeba polyphaga Mimivirus (APMV) was isolated from amoebae in a hospital while investigating a pneumonia outbreak. Mimivirus ubiquity and role as protist pathogens are well understood, and its putative status as a human pathogen has been gaining strength as more evidence is being found...
January 2017: Journal of Interferon & Cytokine Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28073551/the-common-bloom-forming-cyanobacterium-microcystis-is-prone-to-a-wide-array-of-microbial-antagonists
#10
REVIEW
Jeroen Van Wichelen, Pieter Vanormelingen, Geoffrey A Codd, Wim Vyverman
Many degraded waterbodies around the world are subject to strong proliferations of cyanobacteria - notorious for their toxicity, high biomass build-up and negative impacts on aquatic food webs - the presence of which puts serious limits on the human use of affected water bodies. Cyanobacterial blooms are largely regarded as trophic dead ends since they are a relatively poor food source for zooplankton. As a consequence, their population dynamics are generally attributed to changes in abiotic conditions (bottom-up control)...
May 2016: Harmful Algae
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28073546/killing-potential-protist-predators-as-a-survival-strategy-of-the-newly-described-dinoflagellate-alexandrium-pohangense
#11
Ji Hye Kim, Hae Jin Jeong, An Suk Lim, Jung Rae Rho, Sang Bum Lee
Blooms caused by some species belonging to the dinoflagellate genus Alexandrium are known to cause large-scale mortality of fish. Thus, the dynamics of these species is important and of concern to scientists, officials, and people in the aquaculture industry. To understand the dynamics of such species, their growth and mortality due to predation need to be assessed. The newly described dinoflagellate Alexandrium pohangense is known to grow slowly, with a maximum autotrophic growth rate of 0.1d(-1). Thus, it may not form bloom patches if its mortality due to predation is high...
May 2016: Harmful Algae
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28073472/the-interaction-between-cyanobacteria-and-zooplankton-in-a-more-eutrophic-world
#12
REVIEW
Kemal Ali Ger, Pablo Urrutia-Cordero, Paul C Frost, Lars-Anders Hansson, Orlando Sarnelle, Alan E Wilson, Miquel Lürling
As blooms of cyanobacteria expand and intensify in freshwater systems globally, there is increasing interest in their ecological effects. In addition to being public health hazards, cyanobacteria have long been considered a poor quality food for key zooplankton grazers that link phytoplankton to higher trophic levels. While past laboratory studies have found negative effects of nutritional constraints and defensive traits (i.e., toxicity and colonial or filamentous morphology) on the fitness of large generalist grazers (i...
April 2016: Harmful Algae
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28073394/gregarine-infection-accelerates-larval-development-of-the-cat-flea-ctenocephalides-felis-bouch%C3%A3
#13
M E Alarcón, A Jara-F, R C Briones, A K Dubey, C H Slamovits
A high degree of specialization between host and parasite is a well-known outcome of a long history of coevolution, and it is strikingly illustrated in a coordination of their life cycles. In some cases, the arms race ensued at the establishment of a symbiotic relationship results in the adoption of manipulative strategies by the parasite. We have already learned that Steinina ctenocephali, a gregarine living in the alimentary canal of cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis follows its phenology and metamorphosis...
January 11, 2017: Parasitology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28070270/size-differences-of-arctic-marine-protists-between-two-climate-periods-using-the-paleoecological-record-to-assess-the-importance-of-within-species-trait-variation
#14
Erik A Mousing, Sofia Ribeiro, Chelsea Chisholm, Antoon Kuijpers, Matthias Moros, Marianne Ellegaard
Mean body size decreases with increasing temperature in a variety of organisms. This size-temperature relationship has generally been tested through space but rarely through time. We analyzed the sedimentary archive of dinoflagellate cysts in a sediment record taken from the West Greenland shelf and show that mean cell size decreased at both intra- and interspecific scales in a period of relatively warm temperatures, compared with a period of relatively cold temperatures. We further show that intraspecific changes accounted for more than 70% of the change in community mean size, whereas shifts in species composition only accounted for about 30% of the observed change...
January 2017: Ecology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28061024/beyond-the-code-a-guide-to-the-description-and-documentation-of-biodiversity-in-ciliated-protists-alveolata-ciliophora
#15
Alan Warren, David J Patterson, Micah Dunthorn, John C Clamp, Undine E M Achilles-Day, Erna Aescht, Saleh A Al-Farraj, Saleh Al-Quraishy, Khaled Al-Rasheid, Martin Carr, John G Day, Marc Dellinger, Hamed A El-Serehy, Yangbo Fan, Feng Gao, Shan Gao, Jun Gong, Renu Gupta, Xiaozhong Hu, Komal Kamra, Gaytha Langlois, Xiaofeng Lin, Diana Lipscomb, Christopher S Lobban, Pierangelo Luporini, Denis H Lynn, Honggang Ma, Miroslav Macek, Jacqueline Mackenzie-Dodds, Seema Makhija, Robert I Mansergh, Mercedes Martín-Cereceda, Nettie McMiller, David J S Montagnes, Nikolaeva Svetlana, Geoffrey Odhiambo Ong'ondo, Blanca Pérez-Uz, Jasmine Purushothaman, Pablo Quintela-Alonso, Johana Rotterová, Luciana Santoferrara, Chen Shao, Zhuo Shen, Xinlu Shi, Weibo Song, Thorsten Stoeck, Antonietta La Terza, Adriana Vallesi, Mei Wang, Thomas Weisse, Krzysztof Wiackowski, Lei Wu, Kuidong Xu, Zhenzhen Yi, Rebecca Zufall, Sabine Agatha
Recent advances in molecular technology have revolutionized research on all aspects of the biology of organisms, including ciliates, and created unprecedented opportunities for pursuing a more integrative approach to investigation of biodiversity. However, this goal is complicated by large gaps and inconsistencies that still exist in the foundation of basic information about biodiversity of ciliates. The present paper reviews issues relating to the taxonomy of ciliates and presents specific recommendations for best practice in the observation and documentation of their biodiversity...
January 6, 2017: Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28060364/single-cell-transcriptomics-of-small-microbial-eukaryotes-limitations-and-potential
#16
Zhenfeng Liu, Sarah K Hu, Victoria Campbell, Avery O Tatters, Karla B Heidelberg, David A Caron
Single-cell transcriptomics is an emerging research tool that has huge untapped potential in the study of microbial eukaryotes. Its application has been tested in microbial eukaryotes 50 μm or larger, and it generated transcriptomes similar to those obtained from culture-based RNA-seq. However, microbial eukaryotes have a wide range of sizes and can be as small as 1 μm. Single-cell RNA-seq was tested in two smaller protists (8 and 15 μm). Transcript recovery rate was much lower and randomness in observed gene expression levels was much higher in single-cell transcriptomes than those derived from bulk cultures of cells...
January 6, 2017: ISME Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28056027/quantitative-proteomics-reveals-ecophysiological-effects-of-light-and-silver-stress-on-the-mixotrophic-protist-poterioochromonas-malhamensis
#17
Daniela Beisser, Farnusch Kaschani, Nadine Graupner, Lars Grossmann, Manfred Jensen, Sabrina Ninck, Florian Schulz, Sven Rahmann, Jens Boenigk, Markus Kaiser
Aquatic environments are heavily impacted by human activities including climate warming and the introduction of xenobiotics. Due to the application of silver nanoparticles as bactericidal agent the introduction of silver into the environment strongly has increased during the past years. Silver ions affect the primary metabolism of algae, in particular photosynthesis. Mixotrophic algae are an interesting test case as they do not exclusively rely on photosynthesis which may attenuate the harmful effect of silver...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28055571/a-review-of-methods-for-detection-of-hepatozoon-infection-in-carnivores-and-arthropod-vectors
#18
David Modrý, Relja Beck, Kristýna Hrazdilová, Gad Baneth
Vector-borne protists of the genus Hepatozoon belong to the apicomplexan suborder Adeleorina. The taxonomy of Hepatozoon is unsettled and different phylogenetic clades probably represent evolutionary units deserving the status of separate genera. Throughout our review, we focus on the monophyletic assemblage of Hepatozoon spp. from carnivores, classified as Hepatozoon sensu stricto that includes important pathogens of domestic and free-ranging canine and feline hosts. We provide an overview of diagnostic methods and approaches from classical detection in biological materials, through serological tests to nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs)...
January 2017: Vector Borne and Zoonotic Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28055008/early-nucleolar-disorganization-in-dictyostelium-cell-death
#19
M F Luciani, Y Song, A Sahrane, A Kosta, P Golstein
Cell death occurs in all eukaryotes, but it is still not known whether some core steps of the cell death process are conserved. We investigated this using the protist Dictyostelium. The dissection of events in Dictyostelium vacuolar developmental cell death was facilitated by the sequential requirement for two distinct exogenous signals. An initial exogenous signal (starvation and cAMP) recruited some cells into clumps. Only within these clumps did subsequent cell death events take place. Contrary to our expectations, already this initial signal provoked nucleolar disorganization and irreversible inhibition of rRNA and DNA synthesis, reflecting marked cell dysfunction...
January 5, 2017: Cell Death & Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28054984/detection-of-ribosomal-dna-sequence-polymorphisms-in-the-protist-plasmodiophora-brassicae-for-the-identification-of-geographical-isolates
#20
Rawnak Laila, Arif Hasan Khan Robin, Kiwoung Yang, Gyung Ja Choi, Jong-In Park, Ill-Sup Nou
Clubroot is a soil-borne disease caused by the protist Plasmodiophora brassicae (P. brassicae). It is one of the most economically important diseases of Brassica rapa and other cruciferous crops as it can cause remarkable yield reductions. Understanding P. brassicae genetics, and developing efficient molecular markers, is essential for effective detection of harmful races of this pathogen. Samples from 11 Korean field populations of P. brassicae (geographic isolates), collected from nine different locations in South Korea, were used in this study...
January 4, 2017: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
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