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Splenic infarction

Abdul Wahab, Raseen Tariq
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 15, 2018: Internal and Emergency Medicine
Kate M Richmond, Katharine G Warburton, Simon J Finney, Sachin Shah, Benjamin A J Reddi
INTRODUCTION: Comprehensive clinical examination can be compromised in patients on veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO). Adjunctive diagnostic imaging strategies range from bedside imaging only to routine computed tomography (CT). The risk-benefit of either approach remains to be evaluated. Patients retrieved to the Royal Brompton Hospital (RBH) on VV-ECMO routinely undergo admission CT imaging of head, chest, abdomen and pelvis. This study aimed to identify how frequently changes in therapy or adverse events could be attributed to routine CT scanning...
March 1, 2018: Perfusion
C Viana, H Cristino, C Veiga, P Leão
INTRODUCTION: Wandering spleen is an unusual condition characterized by hypermobility of the spleen. This is a rare clinical entity and it's more common in childhood under 1 year of age and in third decade of life. In this second peak, it's more frequent in females. Clinical manifestations can vary from asymptomatic to abdominal emergency. Treatment is often surgical. PRESENTATION OF CASE: We presented a case report of splenic torsion from our hospital and a review of cases described in literature...
February 25, 2018: International Journal of Surgery Case Reports
Emilie Coppin, Jonathan Florentin, Sathish Babu Vasamsetti, Anagha Arunkumar, John Sembrat, Mauricio Rojas, Dutta Partha
Splenic hematopoiesis is crucial to the pathogenesis of diseases including myocardial infarction and atherosclerosis. The spleen acts as a reservoir of myeloid cells, which are quickly expelled out in response to acute inflammation. In contrast to the well-defined bone marrow hematopoiesis, the cellular and molecular components sustaining splenic hematopoiesis are poorly understood. Surprisingly, we found that, unlike quiescent bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), most of splenic HSC are in the G1 phase in C57BL/6 mice...
March 11, 2018: Immunology and Cell Biology
Ganesh V Halade, Paul C Norris, Vasundhara Kain, Charles N Serhan, Kevin A Ingle
Inflammation promotes healing in myocardial infarction but, if unresolved, leads to heart failure. To define the inflammatory and resolving responses, we quantified leukocyte trafficking and specialized proresolving mediators (SPMs) in the infarcted left ventricle and spleen after myocardial infarction, with the goal of distinguishing inflammation from its resolution. Our data suggest that the spleen not only served as a leukocyte reservoir but also was the site where SPMs were actively generated after coronary ligation in mice...
March 6, 2018: Science Signaling
Mustafa Resorlu, Nilufer Aylanc, Ozan Karatag, Canan Akgun Toprak
Gaucher's disease is characterized by glucocerebroside accumulation in the cells of the reticuloendothelial system. There are three subtypes. The most common is type 1, known as the non-neuropathic form. Pancytopenia, hepatosplenomegaly and bone lesions occur as a result of glucocerebroside accumulation in the liver, lung, spleen and bone marrow in these patients. Findings associated with liver, spleen or bone involvement may be seen at radiological analysis. Improvement in extraskeletal system findings is seen with enzyme replacement therapy...
December 2017: Revista da Associação Médica Brasileira
Divyanshu Mohananey, Ashley Mohadjer, Gosta Pettersson, Jose Navia, Steven Gordon, Nabin Shrestha, Richard A Grimm, L Leonardo Rodriguez, Brian P Griffin, Milind Y Desai
Importance: Infective endocarditis is a life-threating condition with annual mortality of as much as 40% and is associated with embolic events in as many as 80% of cases. These embolic events have notable prognostic implications and have been linked to increased length of stay in intensive care units and mortality. A vegetation size greater than 10 mm has often been suggested as an optimal cutoff to estimate the risk of embolism, but the evidence is based largely on small observational studies...
February 19, 2018: JAMA Internal Medicine
Hirofumi Goto, Tatsuya Tanaka, Natsuki Suetsugi, Yoshihito Kubotsu, Nobuaki Momozaki, Toshihiko Mizuta
A 77-year-old right-handed woman without any liver diseases was admitted to our hospital because of transient right hemiparesis. She developed total aphasia with right hemiplegia on the third hospital day. We suspected that she had a cerebral infarction following a transient ischemic attack. However, brain diffusion-weighted images revealed no abnormal-intensity lesions, and cerebral angiography showed patent arteries. Additionally, her serum ammonia level was elevated. Theta waves without triphasic waves were detected by electroencephalogram...
February 2018: Brain and Nerve, Shinkei Kenkyū No Shinpo
Burke A Cunha, Bertamaria Dieguez, Alena Varantsova
Culture negative endocarditis (CNE) is a common concern in patients with fever, heart murmur, cardiac vegetation, and negative blood cultures. The diagnosis of CNE is not based only on negative blood cultures and a cardiac vegetation. The clinical definition of CNE is based on negative blood cultures plus the findings of culture positive infective endocarditis (IE), e.g., fever, cardiac vegetation, splenomegaly, peripheral manifestations. Because embolic splenic infarcts may occur with culture positive IE, some may assume that splenic infarcts are a sign of CNE...
February 7, 2018: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases
Philippe Le Conte, David Trewick, Philippe Pes, Eric Frampas, Eric Batard
BACKGROUND: Epigastric pain is frequent in Emergency Medicine and remains a challenging situation. Besides benign etiologies such as gastritis or uncomplicated cholelithiasis, it could reveal myocardial infarction or vascular disease. Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) could be performed in such situation. CASE PRESENTATION: A healthy 66-year-old man with no previous medical history was admitted to the Emergency Department for a rapid onset epigastric pain. He reported taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatories for 1 week prior to admission...
February 1, 2018: Critical Ultrasound Journal
Caitlin Finn, Peter Hung, Praneil Patel, Ajay Gupta, Hooman Kamel
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Most cryptogenic strokes are thought to have an embolic source. We sought to determine whether cryptogenic strokes are associated with visceral infarcts, which are usually embolic. METHODS: Among patients prospectively enrolled in CAESAR (Cornell Acute Stroke Academic Registry), we selected those with a contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomographic scan within 1 year of admission. Our exposure variable was adjudicated stroke subtype per the Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment classification...
January 25, 2018: Stroke; a Journal of Cerebral Circulation
Christopher A Febres-Aldana, Lydia Hernandez Howard
Sickle cell disease (SCD) manifests itself with vaso-occlusive episodes leading to infarction. Placement of intravascular catheters provides a useful route for management of pain crises as well as other complications. However, catheter misuse is a commonly unrecognized problem, which can have lethal consequences. We present a case of fatal splenic sequestration/hyperhemolysis secondary to foreign body pulmonary and systemic embolization due to intravenous administration of hydromorphone pills in a young woman with SCD...
January 18, 2018: American Journal of Forensic Medicine and Pathology
Uday Yanamandra, Reena Das, Pankaj Malhotra, Subhash Varma
A 24-year-old man presented with acute abdominal pain upon ascent to moderate altitude (3500 m). An immediate evaluation revealed a splenic infarct, and he was evacuated to sea level. Upon recovery, he was sent back to 3500 m without detailed etiological evaluation, whereupon he experienced recurrent episodes of left-side subcostal pain. Imaging suggested autosplenectomy, and workup revealed a negative thrombophilia profile but was positive for sickle cell trait (SCT). Individuals with SCT can be asymptomatic until exposure to severe hypoxia, upon which they can manifest clinically as sickle cell syndrome...
January 10, 2018: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
Osama Elhardello, Basil J Ammori
Splenic cysts are a rare entity in the Western population and are either true cysts (primary, 25%) or pseudocysts (secondary, 75%) complicating trauma, haemorrhage or infarction. Congenital or simple splenic cysts are the commonest primary cysts and surgery is recommended for cysts larger than 5 cm as these are prone to infection, bleeding or rupture and for symptomatic or complicated cysts. Splenic preservation techniques using the laparoscopic approach are the most prevalent. We present a case of a giant painful simple splenic cyst treated with laparoscopic de-capsulation with application of a new technique for achieving vascular control, whereby control of the splenic pedicle was achieved using a Nylon tape...
January 2018: Journal of Surgical Case Reports
Ningning Sun, Guangjun Lu, Likun Zhang, Xiaoling Wang, Chunmin Gao, Jieliang Bi, Xiaoyi Wang
OBJECTIVE: The meta-analysis was performed to investigate the clinical efficacy of spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy with splenic vessel preservation (SPDP-SVP) and spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy with splenic vessel resection (SPDP-SVR). METHODS: Potential articles were searched on the databases of Pubmed, Embase, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) from January 1988 until March 2017. Weight mean difference (WMD) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was applied to compare the efficacy of SPDP-SVP and SPDP-SVR...
December 2017: Medicine (Baltimore)
Mithilesh Kumar Sinha, Babita Raghuwanshi, Nerbadyswari Deep Bag, Apurba Barman
Sickle cell trait is a highly prevalent condition. It is not a disease. However, it has been associated with few rare complications. Splenic infarction is one among them. The altitude-related hypoxia is the most common predisposing factor for this. The simultaneous occurrence of this complication in more than one member of a family is so rare that possibly, it is the only second such case report. We encountered this in two members of a family, the father and his son. They were on a religious visit to a 12,756 feet high mountain cave, when they developed pain left upper abdomen...
October 2017: International Journal of Applied and Basic Medical Research
Pietro Achilli, Angelo Guttadauro, Paolo Bonfanti, Sabina Terragni, Luca Fumagalli, Ugo Cioffi, Francesco Gabrielli, Matilde De Simone, Marco Chiarelli
BACKGROUND: The burden of disease caused by Streptococcus agalactiae has increased significantly among older adults in the last decades. Group B streptococcus infection can be associated with invasive disease and severe clinical syndromes, such as meningitis and endocarditis. CASE PRESENTATION: We present the case of a 56-year-old man who developed multiple mycotic aneurysms of the right hepatic artery and massive splenic infarction as rare complications of Streptococcus agalactiae infective endocarditis...
December 29, 2017: BMC Gastroenterology
Junhui Xiao, Kunwu Yu, Ming Li, Chuanyin Xiong, Yuzhen Wei, Qiutang Zeng
BACKGROUND/AIMS: Regulatory T cells (Tregs) can suppress immunologic damage in myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion injury (MIRI), however, the isolation and ex vivo expansion of these cells for clinical application remains challenging. Here, we investigated whether the IL-2/anti-IL-2 complex (IL-2C), a mediator of Treg expansion, can attenuate MIRI in mice. METHODS: Myocardial I/R was surgically induced in male C57BL/6 mice, aged 8-10 weeks, that were randomly assigned to 1) sham group (Sham), 2) Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS), 3) IL-2-anti-IL-2 Ab complex (IL-2C), or 4) sham group, 5) PBS, 6) IL-2C after MIRI, or 7) IL-2C, 8) IL-2C+anti-CD25 mAbs, or 9) IL-2C; 10) IL-2C+anti-TGF-β1 mAbs, 11) IL-2C+anti-IL-10 mAbs...
2017: Cellular Physiology and Biochemistry
Yon-Cheong Wong, Cheng-Hsien Wu, Li-Jen Wang, Huan-Wu Chen, Kuo-Ching Yuan, Being-Chuan Lin, Yu-Pao Hsu, Shih-Ching Kang
Comparable failure rates of distal or proximal transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) techniques for blunt splenic injuries have been reported. This study is to investigate the efficacy and complication of combining both TAE techniques. We included 26 patients of blunt splenic injuries for TAE therapy and randomized them into distal TAE and combined TAE groups. A prospective study was performed to compare their demographics, clinical parameters, hemograms, post-TAE splenic infarct volumes, splenic abscess and pancreatitis between the two groups...
November 10, 2017: Oncotarget
Deng-Wei Chou, Yie-Wen Lin
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2017: American Journal of the Medical Sciences
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