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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27921519/different-responses-of-drosophila-subobscura-isofemale-lines-to-extremely-low-frequency-magnetic-field-50%C3%A2-hz-0-5%C3%A2-mt-fitness-components-and-locomotor-activity
#1
Danica Zmejkoski, Branka Petković, Sofija Pavković-Lučić, Zlatko Prolić, Marko Anđelković, Tatjana Savić
PURPOSE: Extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields as essential ecological factor may induce specific responses in genetically different lines. The subject of this study was to investigate the impact of ELF magnetic field on fitness components and locomotor activity of five Drosophila subobscura isofemale (IF) lines. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Each D. subobscura IF line, arbitrarily named: B16/1, B24/4, B39/1, B57/2 and B69/5, was maintained in five full-sib inbreeding generations...
December 6, 2016: International Journal of Radiation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27921317/effects-of-economics-and-demographics-on-global-fisheries-sustainability
#2
Qi Ding, Yali Wang, Xinjun Chen, Yong Chen
A good understanding of social factors that lead to marine ecological change is important to develop sustainable global fisheries. In this study we analyzed how economic prosperity and population growth in 122 nations might ultimately affect the sustainability of their marine ecosystems during the period of 1970-2010 using a balanced panel model. We used marine Economic Exclusive Zone (EEZ) catch, mean trophic level of fishery landings (MTL), the primary production required to sustain marine catch expressed as percentage of local primary production (%PPR), and the loss in secondary production index (L index) to indicate ecological changes in marine ecosystems...
December 6, 2016: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27921308/fish-genes-and-genomes-contributions-to-ecology-evolution-and-management
#3
EDITORIAL
G R Carvalho, L Hauser, J Martinsohn, K Naish
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2016: Journal of Fish Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27921295/digest-sticklebacks-don-t-just-go-with-the-flow-genetic-differentiation-between-lake-and-stream-populations-due-to-more-than-just-geographic-distance1
#4
Emilie Richards, Aaron Comeault, Jelmer Poelstra
Speciation is thought to occur in large part through the gradual accumulation of genetic differences between partly or completely isolated populations. However, many species differ greatly in their ecology, prompting research into ecology's role in driving genetic differentiation and speciation. Ultimately, understanding diversification requires understanding the factors that allow populations to diverge enough to no longer be considered the same species. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved...
December 6, 2016: Evolution; International Journal of Organic Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27921293/coloniality-and-migration-are-related-to-selection-on-mhc-genes-in-birds
#5
Piotr Minias, Linda A Whittingham, Peter O Dunn
The Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) plays a key role in pathogen recognition as a part of vertebrate adaptive immune system. The great diversity of MHC genes in natural populations is maintained by different forms of balancing selection and its strength should correlate with the diversity of pathogens to which a population is exposed and the rate of exposure. Despite this prediction, little is known about how the life-history characteristics affect selection at the MHC. Here, we examined whether the strength of balancing selection on MHC class II genes in birds (as measured with nonsynonymous nucleotide substitutions, dN) was related to their social or migratory behaviour, two life-history characteristics correlated with pathogen exposure...
December 6, 2016: Evolution; International Journal of Organic Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27921274/evaluating-determinants-of-rural-villagers-engagement-in-conservation-and-waste-management-behaviors-based-on-integrated-conceptual-framework-of-pro-environmental-behavior
#6
Piyapong Janmaimool, Chaweewan Denpaiboon
This study aims to evaluate determinants of villagers' engagement in pro-environmental behavior (PEB), including ecological conservation behavior (ECB) and waste management behavior (WMB). An integrated exploratory model representing the proposed relationship between villagers' engagement in ECB/WMB and their determinants was created based on the integration of the theory of planned behavior (TPB), the Stern's value belief norm (VBN) theory, environmental education and psychosocial characteristic perspectives...
December 2016: Life Sciences, Society and Policy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27921217/don-t-make-me-angry-you-wouldn-t-like-me-when-i-m-angry-volitional-choices-to-act-or-inhibit-are-modulated-by-subliminal-perception-of-emotional-faces
#7
Jim Parkinson, Sarah Garfinkel, Hugo Critchley, Zoltan Dienes, Anil K Seth
Volitional action and self-control-feelings of acting according to one's own intentions and in being control of one's own actions-are fundamental aspects of human conscious experience. However, it is unknown whether high-level cognitive control mechanisms are affected by socially salient but nonconscious emotional cues. In this study, we manipulated free choice decisions to act or withhold an action by subliminally presenting emotional faces: In a novel version of the Go/NoGo paradigm, participants made speeded button-press responses to Go targets, withheld responses to NoGo targets, and made spontaneous, free choices to execute or withhold the response for Choice targets...
December 5, 2016: Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27921046/weight-management-in-primary-care
#8
REVIEW
Susanne Maurer
BACKGROUND: Obesity is one of the greatest public health challenges worldwide. It is not only a medical but also a philosophical, ecological, economic, sociocultural, and psychological problem as well as a severe consequence of our modern value definition to 'receive more and more'. Therefore, physicians are not able to treat obesity broadly and should not be used as tools to achieve certain weight goals. METHODS: This article presents an outline of conservative obesity therapy...
October 2016: Visceral Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27921008/age-related-differences-in-the-luminal-and-mucosa-associated-gut-microbiome-of-broiler-chickens-and-shifts-associated-with-campylobacter-jejuni-infection
#9
Wageha A Awad, Evelyne Mann, Monika Dzieciol, Claudia Hess, Stephan Schmitz-Esser, Martin Wagner, Michael Hess
Despite the importance of gut microbiota for broiler performance and health little is known about the composition of this ecosystem, its development and response towards bacterial infections. Therefore, the current study was conducted to address the composition and structure of the microbial community in broiler chickens in a longitudinal study from day 1 to day 28 of age in the gut content and on the mucosa. Additionally, the consequences of a Campylobacter (C.) jejuni infection on the microbial community were assessed...
2016: Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27920953/age-growth-and-population-structure-of-invasive-lionfish-pterois-volitans-miles-in-northeast-florida-using-a-length-based-age-structured-population-model
#10
Eric G Johnson, Mary Katherine Swenarton
The effective management of invasive species requires detailed understanding of the invader's life history. This information is essential for modeling population growth and predicting rates of expansion, quantifying ecological impacts and assessing the efficacy of removal and control strategies. Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois volitans/miles) have rapidly invaded the western Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea with documented negative impacts on native ecosystems. To better understand the life history of this species, we developed and validated a length-based, age-structured model to investigate age, growth and population structure in northeast Florida...
2016: PeerJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27920788/vegetative-and-adaptive-traits-predict-different-outcomes-for-restoration-using-hybrids
#11
Philip A Crystal, Nathanael I Lichti, Keith E Woeste, Douglass F Jacobs
Hybridization has been implicated as a driver of speciation, extinction, and invasiveness, but can also provide resistant breeding stock following epidemics. However, evaluating the appropriateness of hybrids for use in restoration programs is difficult. Past the F1 generation, the proportion of a progenitor's genome can vary widely, as can the combinations of parental genomes. Detailed genetic analysis can reveal this information, but cannot expose phenotypic alterations due to heterosis, transgressive traits, or changes in metabolism or development...
2016: Frontiers in Plant Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27920771/evidence-for-ecological-flexibility-in-the-cosmopolitan-genus-curtobacterium
#12
Alexander B Chase, Philip Arevalo, Martin F Polz, Renaud Berlemont, Jennifer B H Martiny
Assigning ecological roles to bacterial taxa remains imperative to understanding how microbial communities will respond to changing environmental conditions. Here we analyze the genus Curtobacterium, as it was found to be the most abundant taxon in a leaf litter community in southern California. Traditional characterization of this taxon predominantly associates it as the causal pathogen in the agricultural crops of dry beans. Therefore, we sought to investigate whether the abundance of this genus was because of its role as a plant pathogen or another ecological role...
2016: Frontiers in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27920390/life-history-trade-offs-the-intensity-of-competition-and-coexistence-in-novel-and-evolving-communities-under-climate-change
#13
Lesley T Lancaster, Gavin Morrison, Robert N Fitt
The consequences of climate change for local biodiversity are little understood in process or mechanism, but these changes are likely to reflect both changing regional species pools and changing competitive interactions. Previous empirical work largely supports the idea that competition will intensify under climate change, promoting competitive exclusions and local extinctions, while theory and conceptual work indicate that relaxed competition may in fact buffer communities from biodiversity losses that are typically witnessed at broader spatial scales...
January 19, 2017: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27920389/resistance-in-persisting-bat-populations-after-white-nose-syndrome-invasion
#14
Kate E Langwig, Joseph R Hoyt, Katy L Parise, Winifred F Frick, Jeffrey T Foster, A Marm Kilpatrick
Increases in anthropogenic movement have led to a rise in pathogen introductions and the emergence of infectious diseases in naive host communities worldwide. We combined empirical data and mathematical models to examine changes in disease dynamics in little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus) populations following the introduction of the emerging fungal pathogen Pseudogymnoascus destructans, which causes the disease white-nose syndrome. We found that infection intensity was much lower in persisting populations than in declining populations where the fungus has recently invaded...
January 19, 2017: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27920388/human-drivers-of-ecological-and-evolutionary-dynamics-in-emerging-and-disappearing-infectious-disease-systems
#15
REVIEW
Mary A Rogalski, Camden D Gowler, Clara L Shaw, Ruth A Hufbauer, Meghan A Duffy
Humans have contributed to the increased frequency and severity of emerging infectious diseases, which pose a significant threat to wild and domestic species, as well as human health. This review examines major pathways by which humans influence parasitism by altering (co)evolutionary interactions between hosts and parasites on ecological timescales. There is still much to learn about these interactions, but a few well-studied cases show that humans influence disease emergence every step of the way. Human actions significantly increase dispersal of host, parasite and vector species, enabling greater frequency of infection in naive host populations and host switches...
January 19, 2017: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27920387/adaptive-capabilities-and-fitness-consequences-associated-with-pollution-exposure-in-fish
#16
REVIEW
Patrick B Hamilton, Gregor Rolshausen, Tamsyn M Uren Webster, Charles R Tyler
Many fish populations are exposed to harmful levels of chemical pollution and selection pressures associated with these exposures have led to the evolution of tolerance. Our understanding of the physiological basis for these adaptations is limited, but they are likely to include processes involved with the absorption, distribution, metabolism and/or excretion of the target chemical. Other potential adaptive mechanisms include enhancements in antioxidant responses, an increased capacity for DNA and/or tissue repair and alterations to the life cycle of fish that enable earlier reproduction...
January 19, 2017: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27920386/does-eutrophication-driven-evolution-change-aquatic-ecosystems
#17
REVIEW
Timothy J Alexander, Pascal Vonlanthen, Ole Seehausen
Eutrophication increases primary production and changes the relative abundance, taxonomic composition and spatial distribution of primary producers within an aquatic ecosystem. The changes in composition and location of resources alter the distribution and flow of energy and biomass throughout the food web. Changes in productivity also alter the physico-chemical environment, which has further effects on the biota. Such ecological changes influence the direction and strength of natural and sexual selection experienced by populations...
January 19, 2017: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27920385/sublethal-streptomycin-concentrations-and-lytic-bacteriophage-together-promote-resistance-evolution
#18
Johannes Cairns, Lutz Becks, Matti Jalasvuori, Teppo Hiltunen
Sub-minimum inhibiting concentrations (sub-MICs) of antibiotics frequently occur in natural environments owing to wide-spread antibiotic leakage by human action. Even though the concentrations are very low, these sub-MICs have recently been shown to alter bacterial populations by selecting for antibiotic resistance and increasing the rate of adaptive evolution. However, studies are lacking on how these effects reverberate into key ecological interactions, such as bacteria-phage interactions. Previously, co-selection of bacteria by phages and antibiotic concentrations exceeding MICs has been hypothesized to decrease the rate of resistance evolution because of fitness costs associated with resistance mutations...
January 19, 2017: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27920384/antibiotic-resistance-in-the-wild-an-eco-evolutionary-perspective
#19
REVIEW
Teppo Hiltunen, Marko Virta, Anna-Liisa Laine
The legacy of the use and misuse of antibiotics in recent decades has left us with a global public health crisis: antibiotic-resistant bacteria are on the rise, making it harder to treat infections. At the same time, evolution of antibiotic resistance is probably the best-documented case of contemporary evolution. To date, research on antibiotic resistance has largely ignored the complexity of interactions that bacteria engage in. However, in natural populations, bacteria interact with other species; for example, competition and grazing are import interactions influencing bacterial population dynamics...
January 19, 2017: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27920383/effects-of-fragmentation-on-plant-adaptation-to-urban-environments
#20
Jonathan Dubois, Pierre-Olivier Cheptou
Urban ecosystems are relatively recent and heavily human-altered terrestrial ecosystems with a surprisingly high diversity of animals, plants and other organisms. Urban habitats are also strongly fragmented and subject to higher temperatures, providing a compelling model for studying adaptation to global change. Crepis sancta (Asteraceae), an annual Mediterranean wasteland weed, occupies fragmented urban environments as well as certain unfragmented landscapes in southern France. We tested for shifts in dispersal, reproductive traits and size across a rural-urban gradient to learn whether and how selection may be driving changes in life history in urban and fragmented habitats...
January 19, 2017: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
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