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Gualtiero Alvisi, Marta Trevisan, Giulia Masi, Vanessa Canel, Luciana Caenazzo, Patrizia Nespeca, Luisa Barzon, Enzo Di Iorio, Vanessa Barbaro, Giorgio Palù
Human oral mucosa epithelial stem cells (hOMESCs) were obtained from a fresh oral biopsy collected from a healthy subject at the Fondazione Banca degli Occhi del Veneto (FBOV). An integration-free reprogramming protocol was applied exploiting episomal plasmids transfected into cells using a Nucleofector device. Around day 20 post transfection, several human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) colonies were manually picked and expanded. One of these (UNIPDi001-A-hiPSCs) expressed undifferentiated state marker alkaline phosphatase along with a panel of pluripotency state markers and was able to differentiate into the derivatives of all the three germ layers...
February 18, 2018: Stem Cell Research
Melissa Tomkins, Adi Kliot, Athanasius Fm Marée, Saskia A Hogenhout
Members of the Candidatus genus Phytoplasma are small bacterial pathogens that hijack their plant hosts via the secretion of virulence proteins (effectors) leading to a fascinating array of plant phenotypes, such as witch's brooms (stem proliferations) and phyllody (retrograde development of flowers into vegetative tissues). Phytoplasma depend on insect vectors for transmission, and interestingly, these insect vectors were found to be (in)directly attracted to plants with these phenotypes. Therefore, phytoplasma effectors appear to reprogram plant development and defence to lure insect vectors, similarly to social engineering malware, which employs tricks to lure people to infected computers and webpages...
March 13, 2018: Current Opinion in Plant Biology
Erwan Goy, Corinne Abbadie
When ageing, cells profoundly reprogram to enter a state called senescence. Although the link between senescence and cancer is well established, the nature of this link remains unclear and debated. We will describe in this article the properties of senescent cells and make clear on how they could promote or oppose to cancer initiation and progression. We will also consider senescence as a response to classical anti-cancer therapies and discuss how to take advantage of senescence to improve the efficacy of these therapies while decreasing their toxicity...
March 2018: Médecine Sciences: M/S
Zhiyi Qin, Peter Stoilov, Xuegong Zhang, Yi Xing
Alternative first exons diversify the transcriptomes of eukaryotes by producing variants of the 5' Untranslated Regions (5'UTRs) and N-terminal coding sequences. Accurate transcriptome-wide detection of alternative first exons typically requires specialized experimental approaches that are designed to identify the 5' ends of transcripts. We developed a computational pipeline SEASTAR that identifies first exons from RNA-seq data alone then quantifies and compares alternative first exon usage across multiple biological conditions...
March 13, 2018: Nucleic Acids Research
Xiang Song, Yan Zhang, Li Zhang, Wengang Song, Lixin Shi
Hypoxia-associated metabolic reprogramming modulates the biological functions of many immune and non-immune cells, and affects immune response types and intensities. Adenosine and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) are known immunosuppressors, and adenosine is a hypoxia-associated product. We investigated the impact of hypoxia on IDO production in dendritic cells (DCs). We found that hypoxia (1% O2 ) enhances IDO production in DCs, and this increase was dependent on the adenosine A3 receptor (A3R), but not A2aR or A2bR...
February 20, 2018: Oncotarget
Liting Jin, Ying Qu, Liliana J Gomez, Stacey Chung, Bingchen Han, Bowen Gao, Yong Yue, Yiping Gong, Xuefeng Liu, Farin Amersi, Catherine Dang, Armando E Giuliano, Xiaojiang Cui
Purpose: Conditional reprogramming methods allow for the inexhaustible in vitro proliferation of primary epithelial cells from human tissue specimens. This methodology has the potential to enhance the utility of primary cell culture as a model for mammary gland research. However, few studies have systematically characterized this method in generating in vitro normal human mammary epithelial cell models. Results: We show that cells derived from fresh normal breast tissues can be propagated and exhibit heterogeneous morphologic features...
February 20, 2018: Oncotarget
Delphine Lumbroso, Soaad Soboh, Avi Maimon, Sagie Schif-Zuck, Amiram Ariel, Tal Burstyn-Cohen
The complete resolution of inflammation requires the uptake of apoptotic polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) by local macrophages (efferocytosis) and the consequent reprogramming of the engulfing phagocytes to reparative and pro-resolving phenotypes. The tyrosine kinase receptors TYRO3, AXL, and MERTK (collectively named TAM) are fundamental mediators in regulating inflammatory responses and efferocytosis. Protein S (PROS1) is a ligand for all TAM receptors that mediates various aspects of their activity. However, the involvement of PROS1 in the resolution of inflammation is incompletely understood...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Ibrahim El-Battrawy, Zhihan Zhao, Huan Lan, Xin Li, Gökhan Yücel, Siegfried Lang, Katherine Sattler, Jan-Dierk Schünemann, Wolfram-Hubertus Zimmermann, Lukas Cyganek, Jochen Utikal, Thomas Wieland, Karen Bieback, Ralf Bauer, Antonius Ratte, Regina Pribe-Wolferts, Kleopatra Rapti, Daniel Nowak, Janina Wittig, Dierk Thomas, Patrick Most, Hugo A Katus, Ursula Ravens, Constanze Schmidt, Martin Borggrefe, Xiao-Bo Zhou, Oliver J Müller, Ibrahim Akin
BACKGROUND: Limb-Girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are a heritable group of genetically determined disorders with a primary involvement of the pelvic or shoulder girdle musculature with partially cardiac manifestation, such as dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and life-threatening tachyarrhythmia. We report here that human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes from a patient with LGMD2I and DCM associated with recurrent ventricular tachycardia displayed ion channel dysfunction and abnormality of calcium homeostasis...
March 2018: Circ Genom Precis Med
Jun-Ho Cho, Goo-Young Kim, Brian C Mansfield, Janice Y Chou
Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) is caused by a deficiency in glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase-α or G6PC), a key enzyme in endogenous glucose production. This autosomal recessive disorder is characterized by impaired glucose homeostasis and long-term complications of hepatocellular adenoma/carcinoma (HCA/HCC). We have shown that hepatic G6Pase-α deficiency-mediated steatosis leads to defective autophagy that is frequently associated with carcinogenesis. We now show that hepatic G6Pase-α deficiency also leads to enhancement of hepatic glycolysis and hexose monophosphate shunt (HMS) that can contribute to hepatocarcinogenesis...
March 12, 2018: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Weiyang Chen, Longfa Fang, Xiahe Huang, Haitao Ge, Jinlong Wang, Xiaorong Wang, Yuanya Zhang, Na Sui, Wu Xu, Yingchun Wang
Differential expression of cold-responsive proteins is necessary for cyanobacteria to acclimate to cold stress frequently occurring in their natural habitats. Accumulating evidence indicates that cold-induced expression of certain proteins is dependent on light illumination, but a systematic identification of light-dependent and/or light-independent cold-responsive proteins in cyanobacteria is still lacking. Herein, we comprehensively identified cold-responsive proteins in a model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp...
March 12, 2018: Journal of Proteomics
Mohammad Golam Mostofa, Ajit Ghosh, Zhong-Guang Li, Md Nurealam Siddiqui, Masayuki Fujita, Lam-Son Phan Tran
Abiotic stresses are the most common harmful factors, adversely affecting all aspects of plants' life. Plants have to elicit appropriate responses against multifaceted effects of abiotic stresses by reprogramming various cellular processes. Signaling molecules play vital roles in sensing environmental stimuli to modulate gene expression, metabolism and physiological processes in plants to cope with the adverse effects. Methylglyoxal (MG), a dicarbonyl compound, is known to accumulate in cells as a byproduct of various metabolic pathways, including glycolysis...
March 12, 2018: Free Radical Biology & Medicine
Daniel J Dennis, Sisu Han, Carol Schuurmans
The formation of functional neural circuits in the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) requires that appropriate numbers of the correct types of neuronal and glial cells are generated in their proper places and times during development. In the embryonic CNS, multipotent progenitor cells first acquire regional identities, and then undergo precisely choreographed temporal identity transitions (i.e. time-dependent changes in their identity) that determine how many neuronal and glial cells of each type they will generate...
March 12, 2018: Brain Research
Luca Palazzese, Marta Czernik, Domenico Iuso, Paola Toschi, Pasqualino Loi
Recently we have demonstrated the possibility to replace histones with protamine, through the heterologous expression of human protamine 1 (hPrm1) gene in sheep fibroblasts. Here we have optimized protaminization of somatic nucleus by adjusting the best concentration and exposure time to trichostatin A (TSA) in serum-starved fibroblasts (nuclear quiescence), before expressing Prm1 gene. To stop cell proliferation, we starved cells in 0.5% FBS in MEM ("starved"-ST group), whereas in the Control group (CTR) the cells were cultured in 10% FBS in MEM...
2018: PloS One
Alexandra J Harvey, Carmel O'Brien, Jack Lambshead, John R Sheedy, Joy Rathjen, Andrew L Laslett, David K Gardner
Reprogramming somatic cells to a pluripotent cell state (induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) cells) requires reprogramming of metabolism to support cell proliferation and pluripotency, most notably changes in carbohydrate turnover that reflect a shift from oxidative to glycolytic metabolism. Some aspects of iPS cell metabolism differ from embryonic stem (ES) cells, which may reflect a parental cell memory, or be a consequence of the reprogramming process. In this study, we compared the metabolism of 3 human iPS cell lines to assess the fidelity of metabolic reprogramming...
2018: PloS One
Núria Folguera-Blasco, Elisabet Cuyàs, Javier A Menéndez, Tomás Alarcón
Understanding the control of epigenetic regulation is key to explain and modify the aging process. Because histone-modifying enzymes are sensitive to shifts in availability of cofactors (e.g. metabolites), cellular epigenetic states may be tied to changing conditions associated with cofactor variability. The aim of this study is to analyse the relationships between cofactor fluctuations, epigenetic landscapes, and cell state transitions. Using Approximate Bayesian Computation, we generate an ensemble of epigenetic regulation (ER) systems whose heterogeneity reflects variability in cofactor pools used by histone modifiers...
March 15, 2018: PLoS Computational Biology
Tingchao Mao, Chengquan Han, Ruizhi Deng, Biao Wei, Peng Meng, Yan Luo, Yong Zhang
Epigenetic modifications extensively occur in mammalian embryonic development and cell differentiation process. They play an essential role in the reprogramming of nuclei during somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and subsequent in vitro embryonic development. Recently, SCNT embryos have been verified to contain a subnormal level of histone H3K4 dimethylation (H3K4me2) in contrast to in vitro fertilized embryos. This finding suggested that increasing H3K4me2 levels may ameliorate the aberrant development of cloned embryos...
March 15, 2018: Systems Biology in Reproductive Medicine
Neerupma Bhardwaj, Kirtimaan Syal, Dipankar Chatterji
ppGpp, an alarmone for stringent response, plays an important role in the reprogramming of the transcription complex at the time of stress. In Escherichia coli, ppGpp mediates its action by binding to at least two different sites on RNA polymerase (RNAP). One of the sites to which ppGpp binds to RNAP is at the β'-ω interface; however, the underlying molecular mechanism and the physiological relevance of ppGpp binding to this site remain unclear. In this study, we have performed UV cross-linking experiments using32 P azido-labeled ppGpp to probe its association with RNAP in the absence and presence of ω, and observed weaker binding of ppGpp to the RNAP without ω...
March 15, 2018: Genes to Cells: Devoted to Molecular & Cellular Mechanisms
Joy Ogbechi, Belinda S Hall, Thomas Sbarrato, Jack Taunton, Anne E Willis, Ronald C Wek, Rachel E Simmonds
Mycolactone is the exotoxin virulence factor of Mycobacterium ulcerans that causes the neglected tropical disease Buruli ulcer. We recently showed it to be a broad spectrum inhibitor of Sec61-dependent co-translational translocation of proteins into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). An outstanding question is the molecular pathway linking this to its known cytotoxicity. We have now used translational profiling to better understand the reprogramming that occurs in cells exposed to mycolactone. Gene ontology identified enrichment in genes involved in cellular response to stress, and apoptosis signalling among those showing enhanced translation...
March 14, 2018: Cell Death & Disease
Tong Sun, Shin-Yi Du, Joshua Armenia, Fangfang Qu, Jingyu Fan, Xiaodong Wang, Teng Fei, Kazumasa Komura, Shirley X Liu, Gwo-Shu Mary Lee, Philip W Kantoff
Mechanisms by which non-coding RNAs contribute to the progression of hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (PCa) (HSPC) to castration-resistant PCa (CRPC) remain largely unknown. We previously showed that microRNA-221/222 is up-regulated in CRPC and plays a critical role in modulating androgen receptor function during CRPC development. With further investigation, we characterized a putative promoter region located 23.3 kb upstream of the miR-221/222 gene, and this promoter is differentially activated in CRPC LNCaP-Abl cells, leading to the up-regulation of miR-221/222...
March 13, 2018: Oncogenesis
Filippo Cortesi, Gloria Delfanti, Andrea Grilli, Arianna Calcinotto, Francesca Gorini, Ferdinando Pucci, Roberta Lucianò, Matteo Grioni, Alessandra Recchia, Fabio Benigni, Alberto Briganti, Andrea Salonia, Michele De Palma, Silvio Bicciato, Claudio Doglioni, Matteo Bellone, Giulia Casorati, Paolo Dellabona
Heterotypic cellular and molecular interactions in the tumor microenvironment (TME) control cancer progression. Here, we show that CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer (iNKT) cells control prostate cancer (PCa) progression by sculpting the TME. In a mouse PCa model, iNKT cells restrained the pro-angiogenic and immunosuppressive capabilities of tumor-infiltrating immune cells by reducing pro-angiogenic TIE2+ , M2-like macrophages (TEMs), and sustaining pro-inflammatory M1-like macrophages. iNKT cells directly contacted macrophages in the PCa stroma, and iNKT cell transfer into tumor-bearing mice abated TEMs, delaying tumor progression...
March 13, 2018: Cell Reports
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