Read by QxMD icon Read


Vassilis E Papadopoulos, Georgia Nikolopoulou, Ivi Antoniadou, Antonia Karachaliou, Giovanna Arianoglou, Evangelia Emmanouilidou, S Pablo Sardi, Leonidas Stefanis, Kostas Vekrellis
Glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA) mutations are the most common genetic contributor to Parkinson's Disease (PD) and are associated with decreased Glucocerebrosidase (GCase) enzymatic activity in PD. PD patients without GBA mutations also exhibit lower levels of GCase activity in the central nervous system (CNS) suggesting a potential contribution of the enzyme activity in disease pathogenesis, possibly by alteration of lysosomal function. α-synuclein, a protein with a central role in PD pathogenesis, has been shown to be secreted partly in association with exosomes...
March 14, 2018: Human Molecular Genetics
Jeffrey Zielich, Elena Tzima, Eva Ayla Schröder, Faten Jemel, Barbara Conradt, Eric J Lambie
P5B ATPases are present in the genomes of diverse unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes, indicating that they have an ancient origin, and that they are important for cellular fitness. Inactivation of ATP13A2, one of the four human P5B ATPases, leads to early-onset Parkinson's disease (Kufor-Rakeb Syndrome). The presence of an invariant PPALP motif within the putative substrate interaction pocket of transmembrane segment M4 suggests that all P5B ATPases might have similar transport specificity; however, the identity of the transport substrate(s) remains unknown...
2018: PloS One
Michael Baer, Bradley Klemetson, Diana Scott, Andrew S Murtishaw, James W Navalta, Jefferson W Kinney, Merrill R Landers
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Because falls can have deleterious consequences, it is important to understand the influence of fatigue and medications on balance in persons with Parkinson disease (PD). Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of fatigue on balance in individuals with PD. Because brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been shown to be related to motor performance, we also explored its role. METHODS: A total of 27 individuals (age = 65...
April 2018: Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy: JNPT
Audrey M Bernstein, Robert Ritch, J Mario Wolosin
Exfoliation syndrome (XFS) is an age-related disease involving the deposition of aggregated fibrillar material (XFM) at extracellular matrices in tissues that synthesize elastic fibers. Its main morbidity is in the eye, where XFM accumulations form on the surface of the ciliary body, iris and lens. Exfoliation glaucoma (XFG) occurs in a high proportion of persons with XFS and can be a rapidly progressing disease. Worldwide, XFG accounts for about 25% of open-angle glaucoma cases. XFS and XFG show a sharp age-dependence, similarly to the many age-related diseases classified as aggregopathies...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Glaucoma
Parkinson Soubam, Shashwat Mishra, Ashish Suri, Renu Dhingra, Sankat Mochan, Sanjeev Lalwani, T S Roy, Ashok K Mahapatra
A surgeon's understanding of the surgical anatomy can be greatly enhanced by the dissection of preserved cadaveric specimens. A reliable and inexpensive biological model for testing and standardization of dye injection concentrations is proposed utilizing the goat's head as a biological model. The first phase was concerned with standardization of the dye by titrating its concentration and injecting various amounts into cerebral vessels of a goat's head until an optimal concentration had been ascertained. In the second phase, this optimum concentration of the dye was injected into four human cadaveric heads following the same technique standardized using the goat's head...
March 2018: Neurology India
Rajeev Ranjan, Arra Abhinay, Monalisa Mishra
Neurodegenerative diseases, e.g., Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, etc., are serious life-threatening diseases, which involve degeneration of the neurons with time. Numerous studies have discussed the role of microbes in neurodegeneration. Oral cavity being the primary site of infection acts as a gateway for gigantic population of microbes to the human body. Oral infection is known to be associated with neurodegeneration. The current review summarizes various mechanisms due to which the oral microbiome can cause neurodegeneration...
March 2018: Neurology India
Tsinsue Chen, Zaman Mirzadeh, Kristina M Chapple, Margaret Lambert, Holly A Shill, Guillermo Moguel-Cobos, Alexander I Tröster, Rohit Dhall, Francisco A Ponce
OBJECTIVE Recent studies have shown similar clinical outcomes between Parkinson disease (PD) patients treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS) under general anesthesia without microelectrode recording (MER), so-called "asleep" DBS, and historical cohorts undergoing "awake" DBS with MER guidance. However, few studies include internal controls. This study aims to compare clinical outcomes after globus pallidus internus (GPi) and subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS using awake and asleep techniques at a single institution...
March 16, 2018: Journal of Neurosurgery
Chih-Wei Hsu, Chin-Chuen Lin, Tiao-Lai Huang
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2018: Psychiatria Danubina
Chye Soi Moi, Chia Kin Yen, Khuen Yen Ng, Koh Rhun Yian
Protein misfolding and aggregation have been considered the common pathological hallmarks for a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD). These abnormal proteins aggregation damage mitochondria and induce oxidative stress and resulting neuronal cell death. Prolong neuronal damage activates microglia and astrocytes, development of inflammation reaction and further promotes neurodegeneration. Thus, elimination of abnormal proteins aggregation without eliciting any adverse effects are the main treatment strategies...
March 15, 2018: CNS & Neurological Disorders Drug Targets
Inbal Maidan, Freek Nieuwhof, Hagar Bernad-Elazari, Bastiaan R Bloem, Nir Giladi, Jeffrey M Hausdorff, Jurgen A H R Claassen, Anat Mirelman
BACKGROUND: In a randomized control trial conducted in patients with Parkinson's disease, a treadmill training program combined with virtual reality that targeted motor and cognitive aspects of safe ambulation led to fewer falls, compared with treadmill training alone. OBJECTIVE: To investigate if the 2 types of training differentially affected prefrontal activation and if this might explain differences in fall rates after the intervention. METHODS: Sixty-four patients with Parkinson's disease were randomized into the treadmill training arm (n = 34, mean age 73...
March 1, 2018: Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair
Peter Bond, David B Parkinson
The use of electron microscopy allows analysis of the microarchitecture of peripheral nerves both during development and in the processes of nerve regeneration and repair.We describe a novel method for the rapid analysis and quantification of myelin in peripheral nerve using a low vacuum scanning electron microscopy protocol. For this methodology, excised nerves are prepared for traditional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging, but at the stage where semi-thin sections would be taken, the resin block is instead imaged at low vacuum in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) using the backscattered electron signal...
2018: Methods in Molecular Biology
Xin-Peng Dun, David B Parkinson
Injury to the peripheral nervous system triggers a series of well-defined events within both neurons and the Schwann cells to allow efficient axonal regeneration, remyelination, and functional repair. The study of these events has previously been done using sections of nerve material to analyze axonal regrowth, cell migration, and immune cell infiltration following injury. This approach, however, has the obvious disadvantage that it is not possible to follow, for instance, the path of regenerating axons in three dimensions within the nerve trunk or the nerve bridge...
2018: Methods in Molecular Biology
Manon Auffret, Sophie Drapier, Marc Vérin
Apomorphine is now recognized as the oldest antiparkinsonian drug on the market. Though still underused, it is increasingly prescribed in Europe for patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) with motor fluctuations. However, its history is far from being limited to movement disorders. This paper traces the history of apomorphine, from its earliest empirical use, to its synthesis, pharmacological development, and numerous indications in human and veterinary medicine, in light of its most recent uses and newest challenges...
March 15, 2018: Drugs in R&D
A Schrag, S Modi, S Hotham, R Merritt, K Khan, L Graham
OBJECTIVE: To report patients' own experiences of receiving a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) and to identify factors influencing this experience. METHODS: A survey by the European Parkinson's Disease Association in 11 European countries. RESULTS: 1775 patients with an average age of 69.7 years participated of whom 54% were male. Those living in rural areas reported having waited longer to seek medical help (p < 0.05). A possible diagnosis of PD was made at the first appointment in a third of respondents...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Neurology
Daniela Cecconi, Luca Dalle Carbonare, Antonio Mori, Samuele Cheri, Michela Deiana, Jessica Brandi, Vincenzo Degaetano, Valentina Masiero, Giulio Innamorati, Monica Mottes, Giovanni Malerba, Maria Teresa Valenti
Melanoma is an aggressive skin cancer; an early detection of the primary tumor may improve its prognosis. Despite many genes have been shown to be involved in melanoma, the full framework of melanoma transformation has not been completely explored. The characterization of pathways involved in tumor restraint in in vitro models may help to identify oncotarget genes. We therefore aimed to probe novel oncotargets through an integrated approach involving proteomic, gene expression and bioinformatic analysis We investigated molecular modulations in melanoma cells treated with ascorbic acid, which is known to inhibit cancer growth at high concentrations...
February 20, 2018: Oncotarget
Elisa Pelosin, Ambra Bisio, Thierry Pozzo, Giovanna Lagravinese, Oscar Crisafulli, Roberta Marchese, Giovanni Abbruzzese, Laura Avanzino
Postural reactions can be influenced by concomitant tasks or different contexts and are modulated by a higher order motor control. Recent studies investigated postural changes determined by motor contagion induced by action observation (chameleon effect) showing that observing a model in postural disequilibrium induces an increase in healthy subjects' body sway. Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with postural instability and impairments in cognitively controlled balance tasks. However, no studies investigated if viewing postural imbalance might influence postural stability in PD and if patients are able to inhibit a visual postural perturbation...
2018: Frontiers in Neurology
Paola Imbriani, Tommaso Schirinzi, Maria Meringolo, Nicola B Mercuri, Antonio Pisani
Significant advances have been made in the understanding of the numerous mechanisms involved in Parkinson's disease (PD) pathogenesis. The identification of PD pathogenic mutations and the use of different animal models have contributed to better elucidate the processes underlying the disease. Here, we report a brief survey of some relevant cellular mechanisms, including autophagic-lysosomal dysfunction, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and mitochondrial impairment, with the main aim to focus on their potential convergent roles in determining early alterations at the synaptic level, mainly consisting in a decrease in dopamine release at nigrostriatal terminals and loss of synaptic plasticity at corticostriatal synapses...
2018: Frontiers in Neurology
Qin Rui, Haibo Ni, Fan Gao, Baoqi Dang, Di Li, Rong Gao, Gang Chen
Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) is widely expressed in the brain and exerts neurotoxicity in Parkinson's disease. The p38/Drosha signaling activation has been reported to increase cell death under stress. This study was designed to investigate the potential role and mechanism of LRRK2 in secondary brain injury after traumatic brain injury (TBI). A total of 130 male Sprague-Dawley rats were examined using a weight-drop model of TBI. The rats received the specific LRRK2 inhibitor PF-06447475 or LRRK2 pDNA alone or in combination with Drosha pDNA...
2018: Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience
Luis R Peraza, Ruth Cromarty, Xenia Kobeleva, Michael J Firbank, Alison Killen, Sara Graziadio, Alan J Thomas, John T O'Brien, John-Paul Taylor
Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) require differential management despite presenting with symptomatic overlap. Currently, there is a need of inexpensive DLB biomarkers which can be fulfilled by electroencephalography (EEG). In this regard, an established electrophysiological difference in DLB is a decrease of dominant frequency (DF)-the frequency with the highest signal power between 4 and 15 Hz. Here, we investigated network connectivity in EEG signals acquired from DLB patients, and whether these networks were able to differentiate DLB from healthy controls (HCs) and associated dementias...
March 15, 2018: Scientific Reports
Charlotte Ridler
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 16, 2018: Nature Reviews. Neurology
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"