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Pseudoprogression

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29775806/case-report-cd103-cd8-lymphocytes-characterize-the-immune-infiltration-in-a-case-with-pseudoprogression-in-sqnsclc
#1
Pedro Rocha, Max Hardy-Werbin, Dolores Naranjo, Álvaro Taus, Maite Rodrigo, Flavio Zuccarino, René Roth, Oliver Wood, Christian H Ottensmeier, Edurne Arriola
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 15, 2018: Journal of Thoracic Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29767308/differentiating-pseudoprogression-from-true-progression-analysis-of-radiographic-biologic-and-clinical-clues-in-gbm
#2
Lindsay S Rowe, John A Butman, Megan Mackey, Joanna H Shih, Theresa Cooley-Zgela, Holly Ning, Mark R Gilbert, DeeDee K Smart, Kevin Camphausen, Andra V Krauze
INTRODUCTION: Pseudoprogression (PsP) is a diagnostic dilemma in glioblastoma (GBM) after chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features may fail to distinguish PsP from early true progression (eTP), however clinical findings may aid in their distinction. METHODS: Sixty-seven patients received CRT for GBM between 2003 and 2016, and had pre- and post-treatment imaging suitable for retrospective evaluation using RANO criteria. Patients with signs of progression within the first 12-weeks post-radiation (P-12) were selected...
May 16, 2018: Journal of Neuro-oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29754968/recurrent-pseudoprogression-in-isocitrate-dehydrogenase-1-mutant-glioblastoma
#3
Sied Kebir, Laurèl Rauschenbach, Gerrit H Gielen, Niklas Schäfer, Theophilos Tzaridis, Björn Scheffler, Frank A Giordano, Lazaros Lazaridis, Ulrich Herrlinger, Martin Glas
In a subset of glioblastoma (GBM) patients, the differentiation between tumor progression and tumor pseudoprogression (PsP) is challenging. This case describes a male patient suffering from isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutant GBM who demonstrated an increasing contrast-enhancing (CE) lesion on a cranial magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) scan 8 months after radiochemotherapy. In accordance with the response assessment in neuro-oncology (RANO) criteria, the cMRI lesion was classified as recurrent tumor, although 18 F-fluoroethyl-L-tyrosine positron emission tomography (18 F-FET-PET) did not indicate vital tumor tissue...
May 10, 2018: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience: Official Journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29738824/radiologic-pseudoprogression-during-anti-pd1-therapy-for-advanced-non-small-cell-lung-cancer
#4
Sharyn I Katz, Mark Hammer, Stephen Bagley, Charu Aggarwal, Joshua Bauml, Jeffrey C Thompson, Arun C Nachiappan, Charles B Simone, Corey Langer
INTRODUCTION: Anti-PD1 (programmed cell death protein 1) therapy can lead to unconventional tumor responses including radiologic pseudoprogression. Here we determine the real-world incidence of radiologic pseudoprogression in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and compare radiologic response criteria for disease response assessment. METHODS: Electronic medical records of all NSCLC patients receiving anti-PD1 therapy at our institution over a 3-year period were retrospectively reviewed and patients with clinically suspected radiologic pseudoprogression identified...
May 5, 2018: Journal of Thoracic Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29734497/pseudoprogression-of-brain-tumors
#5
Stefanie C Thust, Martin J van den Bent, Marion Smits
This review describes the definition, incidence, clinical implications, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of pseudoprogression of brain tumors, in particular, but not limited to, high-grade glioma. Pseudoprogression is an important clinical problem after brain tumor treatment, interfering not only with day-to-day patient care but also the execution and interpretation of clinical trials. Radiologically, pseudoprogression is defined as a new or enlarging area(s) of contrast agent enhancement, in the absence of true tumor growth, which subsides or stabilizes without a change in therapy...
May 7, 2018: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging: JMRI
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29728723/pushing-the-limits-of-immune-related-response-a-case-of-extreme-pseudoprogression
#6
Alvin S Wong, Yee-Liang Thian, Jeevesh Kapur, Cheng-Nang Leong, Patrick Kee, Chun-Tsu Lee, Martin B Lee
The advent of immune checkpoint targeted immunotherapy has seen a spectrum of immune-related phenomena in both tumor responses and toxicities. We describe a case of pseudoprogression that pushes the limits of immune-related response criteria and challenges the boundaries and definitions set by trial protocols. A middle-aged man with conventional clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) had received multiple prior systemic treatments including vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, as well as multiple surgeries and radiotherapy treatments...
May 4, 2018: Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy: CII
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29708785/interval-change-in-diffusion-and-perfusion-mri-parameters-for-the-assessment-of-pseudoprogression-in-cerebral-metastases-treated-with-stereotactic-radiation
#7
James R Knitter, William K Erly, Baldassarre D Stea, Gerald M Lemole, Isabelle M Germano, Amish H Doshi, Kambiz Nael
OBJECTIVE: Apparent increases in the size of cerebral metastases after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) can be caused by pseudoprogression or true disease progression, which poses a diagnostic challenge at conventional MRI. The purpose of this study was to assess whether interval change in DWI and perfusion MRI parameters can differentiate pseudoprogression from progressive disease after treatment with SRS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with apparent growth of cerebral metastases after SRS treatment who underwent pre- and post-SRS DWI, dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC)-MRI, and perfusion dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI were retrospectively evaluated...
April 30, 2018: AJR. American Journal of Roentgenology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29706304/renal-cell-carcinoma-brain-metastasis-with-pseudoprogression-and-radiation-necrosis-on-nivolumab-after-previous-treatment-with-stereotactic-radiosurgery-an-illustrative-case-report-and-review-of-the-literature
#8
Gary D Lewis, Eric Jonasch, Amishix Y Shah, Gregory N Fuller, Andrew M Farach, E Brian Butler, Bin S Teh
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 10, 2018: Practical Radiation Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29681813/hyperprogressive-disease-in-the-irradiation-field-after-a-single-dose-of-nivolumab-for-gastric-cancer-a-case-report
#9
Takatsugu Ogata, Hironaga Satake, Misato Ogata, Yukimasa Hatachi, Hisateru Yasui
Following the ATTRACTION-2 study, nivolumab was approved for advanced gastric cancer in Japan. However, pseudoprogression and hyperprogressive disease have been reported in patients treated with immune checkpoint inhibitors. We report a patient with gastric cancer who received nivolumab after radiotherapy only to experience rapid progression within the irradiation field after the first immunotherapy session. A 66-year-old man with dysphagia visited our hospital and was diagnosed with stage IV gastroesophageal cancer (human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 score = 0)...
January 2018: Case Reports in Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29668571/evaluating-for-pseudoprogression-in-colorectal-and-pancreatic-tumors-treated-with-immunotherapy
#10
Christine M Parseghian, Madhavi Patnana, Priya Bhosale, Kenneth R Hess, Ya-Chen Tina Shih, Bumyang Kim, Scott Kopetz, Michael J Overman, Gauri R Varadhachary, Milind Javle, Aung Naing, Sarina Piha-Paul, David Hong, Hung Le, Vivek Subbiah, Shubham Pant
Pseudoprogression has been observed in patients with various tumor types treated with immunotherapy. However, the frequency of pseudoprogression is unknown in gastrointestinal malignancies. Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) and advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients who progressed on treatment with immunotherapy beyond RECIST version 1.1 criteria were analyzed. Degree of progression, tumor markers, time to progression, overall survival, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status (ECOG PS), and costs were analyzed for patients treated beyond progression (TBP) and not treated beyond progression...
April 17, 2018: Journal of Immunotherapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29666026/cervical-cancer-state-of-the-science-from-angiogenesis-blockade-to-checkpoint-inhibition
#11
REVIEW
Lindsey E Minion, Krishnansu S Tewari
Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has emerged as a therapeutic target in several malignancies, including cervical cancer. Chemotherapy doublets combined with the fully humanized monoclonal antibody, bevacizumab, now constitute first-line therapy for women struggling with recurrent/metastatic cervical carcinoma. Regulatory approval for this indication was based on the phase III randomized trial, GOG 240, which demonstrated a statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvement in overall survival when bevacizumab was added to chemotherapy: 17...
March 2018: Gynecologic Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29618376/pseudoprogression-manifesting-as-recurrent-ascites-with-anti-pd-1-immunotherapy-in-urothelial-bladder-cancer
#12
Randy F Sweis, Yuanyuan Zha, Lomax Pass, Brian Heiss, Tara Chongsuwat, Jason J Luke, Thomas F Gajewski, Russell Szmulewitz
BACKGROUND: Immunotherapies targeting the PD-1 checkpoint pathway have recently gained regulatory approval in numerous cancer types. With the widespread use of immune checkpoint therapies, varying patterns of responses and immune-related adverse events are being observed. CASE PRESENTATION: In this case, we highlight a patient who developed recurrent, large-volume ascites, while simultaneously having a 49% reduction in peritoneal tumor lesion size by RECIST criteria...
April 4, 2018: Journal for Immunotherapy of Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29618107/incidence-and-time-of-onset-of-osseous-pseudoprogression-in-patients-with-metastatic-spine-disease-from-renal-cell-or-prostate-carcinoma-after-treatment-with-stereotactic-body-radiation-therapy
#13
Pejman Jabehdar Maralani, Kathleen Winger, Sean Symons, Matylda Machnowska, Chinthaka Heyn, Ali Helmi, Aimee Chan, Chia-Lin Tseng, Arjun Sahgal
BACKGROUND: Tumor osseous pseudoprogression (PP), defined as an imaging-based transient increase in tumor size following treatment, was recently described in patients with spinal metastases following stereotactic body radiation therapy. Distinguishing PP from true tumor progression is critical. OBJECTIVE: To describe the incidence, time of onset, and time range of PP following stereotactic body radiation therapy in patients treated for spinal metastases from either prostate cancer (PC) or renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and associated predictive factors...
March 29, 2018: Neurosurgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29607190/hyperprogressive-disease-in-patients-with-non-small-cell-lung-cancer-on-immunotherapy
#14
REVIEW
Jonathan S Kurman, Septimiu D Murgu
Immunotherapy agents in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can result in improved quality of life and survival when compared with platinum-based chemotherapy. Novel response patterns such as pseudoprogression and hyperprogression, however, have been described and pose a challenge to treating physicians. Predictors of hyperprogressive disease (HPD) have not yet been identified. Evaluation and management by a multidisciplinary team involving medical and radiation oncologists, thoracic radiologists, and proceduralists is necessary to identify this subset of patients in a timely manner...
February 2018: Journal of Thoracic Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29594248/analysis-of-pseudoprogression-after-proton-or-photon-therapy-of-99-patients-with-low-grade-and-anaplastic-glioma
#15
Julianna K Bronk, Nandita Guha-Thakurta, Pamela K Allen, Anita Mahajan, David R Grosshans, Susan L McGovern
Background and purpose: Proton therapy is increasingly used to treat primary brain tumors. There is concern for higher rates of pseudoprogression (PsP) after protons compared to photons. The purposes of this study are to compare the rate of PsP after proton vs. photon therapy for grade II and III gliomas and to identify factors associated with the development of PsP. Materials and methods: Ninety-nine patients age >18 years with grade II or III glioma treated with photons or protons were retrospectively reviewed...
February 2018: Clinical and Translational Radiation Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29590461/prognostic-value-of-contrast-enhancement-and-flair-for-survival-in-newly-diagnosed-glioblastoma-treated-with-and-without-bevacizumab-results-from-acrin-6686
#16
Jerrold L Boxerman, Zheng Zhang, Yair Safriel, Jeffrey M Rogg, Ronald L Wolf, Suyash Mohan, Helga Marques, A Gregory Sorensen, Mark R Gilbert, Daniel P Barboriak
Background: ACRIN 6686/RTOG 0825 was a phase III trial of conventional chemoradiation plus adjuvant temozolomide with bevacizumab or without (placebo) in newly diagnosed glioblastoma. This study investigated whether changes in contrast-enhancing and FLAIR-hyperintense tumor assessed by central reading prognosticate overall survival (OS). Methods: 284 patients (171 men; median age 57 years, range 19-79; 159 on bevacizumab) had MRI at post-op (baseline) and pre-cycle 4 of adjuvant temozolomide (22 weeks post- chemoradiation initiation)...
March 26, 2018: Neuro-oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29579717/pseudoprogression-and-hyperprogression-after-checkpoint-blockade
#17
REVIEW
Qiaohong Wang, Jingze Gao, Xia Wu
Immune checkpoint inhibitors appear to be one of the most promising immunotherapies with significant clinical benefits and durable responses in multiple tumor types. A heterogeneity of responses appears in patients receiving checkpoint blockade, including pseudoprogression where the tumor burden or number of tumor lesions increases initially before decreasing. Another special response observed after checkpoint blockade is hyperprogression, a phenomenon reflecting a very rapid tumor progression following immunotherapy, suggesting that checkpoint blockade could impact detrimentally on a small subset of patients...
March 23, 2018: International Immunopharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29573843/thoracic-imaging-of-non-small-cell-lung-cancer-treated-with-anti-programmed-death-receptor-1-therapy
#18
Mark Hammer, Stephen Bagley, Charu Aggarwal, Joshua Bauml, Arun Nachiappan, Charles B Simone, Corey Langer, Sharyn I Katz
PURPOSE: Treatment with anti-programmed death receptor-1 (PD-1) therapeutics can lead to unconventional responses and side effect profiles due to their potentiating effects on the immune system. Here we evaluate the radiologic manifestations of anti-PD-1 therapy in the chest in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving anti-PD-1 therapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective review of real-world clinical practice was conducted of all the patients with NSCLC receiving anti-PD-1 therapy at our institution between 2013 and 2016...
January 31, 2018: Current Problems in Diagnostic Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29549485/pseudoprogression-and-hyperprogression-during-immune-checkpoint-inhibitor-therapy-for-urothelial-and-kidney-cancer
#19
Francesco Soria, Andrea I Beleni, David D'Andrea, Irene Resch, Kilian M Gust, Paolo Gontero, Shahrokh F Shariat
OBJECTIVES: A small subset of patients treated with immune checkpoint inhibitors manifest atypical patterns of response, the so-called pseudoprogression (PP) and hyperprogression (HP). Their prevalence in urothelial (UC) and renal cancer (RCC) remains, to date, mostly uninvestigated. Therefore, we aimed to provide a summary of the current knowledge about PP and HP during immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy in UC and RCC patients. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A systematic medline/pubmed© literature search was performed...
March 16, 2018: World Journal of Urology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29548049/imaging-criteria-in-neuro-oncology
#20
Martha Nowosielski, Patrick Y Wen
The identification of more effective therapies for brain tumors has been limited in part by the lack of reliable criteria for determining response and progression. Since its introduction in 1990, the MacDonald criteria have been used in neuro-oncology clinical trials to determine response, but they fail to address issues such as pseudoprogression, pseudoresponse, and nonenhancing tumor progression that have arisen with more recent therapies. The Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (RANO) working group, a multidisciplinary international group consisting of neuro-oncologists, medical oncologists, neuroradiologists, neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, and neuropsychologists, was formed to improve response assessment and clinical trial endpoints in neuro-oncology...
February 2018: Seminars in Neurology
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