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Sylvia L R Wood, Jeanine M Rhemtulla, Oliver T Coomes
In the study of shifting cultivation systems, fallow duration is seen as the key determinant of vegetation and soil dynamics: long fallows renew soil fertility, biomass and biodiversity. However, long fallow systems are increasingly replaced around the world with short-medium fallow systems, and awareness is growing of the need to look across multiple (not just single) crop-fallow cycles to accurately understand observed soil and vegetation patterns. In a study from Peru that builds on field-level land-use histories (50+ years), we found that over multiple crop-fallow cycles, farmer's cropping practices mattered more than fallow duration for biodiversity and soil fertility...
October 22, 2016: Ecological Applications: a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
Letícia Couto Garcia, Danilo Bandini Ribeiro, Fabio de Oliveira Roque, Jose Manuel Ochoa-Quintero, William F Laurance
In November 2015, a large mine-tailing dam owned by Samarco Corporation collapsed in Brazil, generating a massive wave of toxic mud that spread down the Doce River, killing 19 people and affecting biodiversity across hundreds of kilometers of river, riparian lands, and Atlantic coast. Besides the disaster's serious human and socioeconomic tolls, we estimate the regional loss of environmental services to be ~US$5.21 billion/year. Although our estimate is conservative, it is still six times higher than the fine imposed on Samarco by Brazilian environmental authorities...
October 22, 2016: Ecological Applications: a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
Lachin Mokhtarnejad, Mahdi Arzanlou, Asadollah Babai-Ahari, Simone Di Mauro, Andrea Onofri, Pietro Buzzini, Benedetta Turchetti
Urmia Lake, located in northwest Iran, is an oligotrophic and extremely hypersaline habitat that supports diverse forms of life. Owing to its unique biodiversity and special environmental conditions, Urmia Lake National Park has been designated as one of the biosphere reserves by UNESCO. This study was aimed to characterize basidiomycetous yeasts in hypersaline soils surrounding the Urmia Lake National Park using a polyphasic combination of molecular and physiological data. Soil samples were collected from eight sites in Lake Basin and six islands insides the lake...
October 21, 2016: Extremophiles: Life Under Extreme Conditions
W Y Licuanan, R Robles, M Dygico, A Songco, R van Woesik
There is an urgent need to quantify coral reef benchmarks that assess changes and recovery rates through time and serve as goals for management. Yet, few studies have identified benchmarks for hard coral cover and diversity in the center of marine diversity. In this study, we estimated coral cover and generic diversity benchmarks on the Tubbataha reefs, the largest and best-enforced no-take marine protected area in the Philippines. The shallow (2-6m) reef slopes of Tubbataha were monitored annually, from 2012 to 2015, using hierarchical sampling...
October 18, 2016: Marine Pollution Bulletin
Tommaso Michele Moles, Antonio Pompeiano, Thais Huarancca Reyes, Andrea Scartazza, Lorenzo Guglielminetti
Landraces represent an important part of the biodiversity well-adapted under limiting environmental conditions. We investigated the response of two Southern Italy tomato landraces, the well-known San Marzano (our commercial standard) and a local accession called "Ciettaicale", to different levels of sodium chloride in water irrigation (from 0 up to 600 mM) for a short-time exposure (one week). The combination of the chlorophyll a fluorescence and gas exchange analyses suggested that Ciettaicale maintained a higher efficiency of photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry and CO2 utilization at high salinity concentrations than San Marzano...
October 12, 2016: Plant Physiology and Biochemistry: PPB
Shauna-Lee Chai, Jian Zhang, Amy Nixon, Scott Nielsen
Accounting for climate change in invasive species risk assessments improves our understanding of potential future impacts and enhances our preparedness for the arrival of new non-native species. We combined traditional risk assessment for invasive species with habitat suitability modeling to assess risk to biodiversity based on climate change. We demonstrate our method by assessing the risk for 15 potentially new invasive plant species to Alberta, Canada, an area where climate change is expected to facilitate the poleward expansion of invasive species ranges...
2016: PloS One
Brent C Emerson, Juliane Casquet, Heriberto López, Pedro Cardoso, Paulo A V Borges, Noémy Mollaret, Pedro Oromí, Dominique Strasberg, Christophe Thébaud
Obtaining fundamental biodiversity metrics such as alpha, beta and gamma diversity for arthropods is often complicated by a lack of prior taxonomic information and/or taxonomic expertise, which can result in unreliable morphologically based estimates. We provide a set of standardized ecological and molecular sampling protocols that can be employed by researchers whose taxonomic skills may be limited, and where there may be a lack of robust a priori information regarding the regional pool of species. These protocols combine mass sampling of arthropods, classification of samples into parataxonomic units (PUs), and selective sampling of individuals for mtDNA sequencing to infer biological species...
October 21, 2016: Molecular Ecology Resources
Joanne E Littlefair, Elizabeth L Clare
Society faces the complex challenge of supporting biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, while ensuring food security by providing safe traceable food through an ever-more-complex global food chain. The increase in human mobility brings the added threat of pests, parasites, and invaders that further complicate our agro-industrial efforts. DNA barcoding technologies allow researchers to identify both individual species, and, when combined with universal primers and high-throughput sequencing techniques, the diversity within mixed samples (metabarcoding)...
September 2, 2016: Genome Génome / Conseil National de Recherches Canada
Vivian M Nguyen, Nathan Young, Steven J Cooke
Scholars across all disciplines have long been interested in how knowledge moves within and beyond their community of peers. In conservation and natural resource management, however, we are lagging behind. Rapid environmental changes and calls for sustainable management practices mean that we urgently need to be using the best knowledge possible in forming decisions, policies, and practices to protect biodiversity and sustainably manage vulnerable natural resources. While the conservation literature on knowledge exchange (KE) and knowledge mobilization (KMb) has grown in recent years, much of it is based on context-specific case studies...
October 21, 2016: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
David J McKenzie, Michael Axelsson, Denis Chabot, Guy Claireaux, Steven J Cooke, Richard A Corner, Gudrun De Boeck, Paolo Domenici, Pedro M Guerreiro, Bojan Hamer, Christian Jørgensen, Shaun S Killen, Sjannie Lefevre, Stefano Marras, Basile Michaelidis, Göran E Nilsson, Myron A Peck, Angel Perez-Ruzafa, Adriaan D Rijnsdorp, Holly A Shiels, John F Steffensen, Jon C Svendsen, Morten B S Svendsen, Lorna R Teal, Jaap van der Meer, Tobias Wang, Jonathan M Wilson, Rod W Wilson, Julian D Metcalfe
The state of the art of research on the environmental physiology of marine fishes is reviewed from the perspective of how it can contribute to conservation of biodiversity and fishery resources. A major constraint to application of physiological knowledge for conservation of marine fishes is the limited knowledge base; international collaboration is needed to study the environmental physiology of a wider range of species. Multifactorial field and laboratory studies on biomarkers hold promise to relate ecophysiology directly to habitat quality and population status...
2016: Conservation Physiology
Alex R Hardisty, Finn Bacall, Niall Beard, Maria-Paula Balcázar-Vargas, Bachir Balech, Zoltán Barcza, Sarah J Bourlat, Renato De Giovanni, Yde de Jong, Francesca De Leo, Laura Dobor, Giacinto Donvito, Donal Fellows, Antonio Fernandez Guerra, Nuno Ferreira, Yuliya Fetyukova, Bruno Fosso, Jonathan Giddy, Carole Goble, Anton Güntsch, Robert Haines, Vera Hernández Ernst, Hannes Hettling, Dóra Hidy, Ferenc Horváth, Dóra Ittzés, Péter Ittzés, Andrew Jones, Renzo Kottmann, Robert Kulawik, Sonja Leidenberger, Päivi Lyytikäinen-Saarenmaa, Cherian Mathew, Norman Morrison, Aleksandra Nenadic, Abraham Nieva de la Hidalga, Matthias Obst, Gerard Oostermeijer, Elisabeth Paymal, Graziano Pesole, Salvatore Pinto, Axel Poigné, Francisco Quevedo Fernandez, Monica Santamaria, Hannu Saarenmaa, Gergely Sipos, Karl-Heinz Sylla, Marko Tähtinen, Saverio Vicario, Rutger Aldo Vos, Alan R Williams, Pelin Yilmaz
BACKGROUND: Making forecasts about biodiversity and giving support to policy relies increasingly on large collections of data held electronically, and on substantial computational capability and capacity to analyse, model, simulate and predict using such data. However, the physically distributed nature of data resources and of expertise in advanced analytical tools creates many challenges for the modern scientist. Across the wider biological sciences, presenting such capabilities on the Internet (as "Web services") and using scientific workflow systems to compose them for particular tasks is a practical way to carry out robust "in silico" science...
October 20, 2016: BMC Ecology
David Samuel Johnson, R Scott Warren, Linda A Deegan, Thomas J Mozdzer
In saltmarsh plant communities, bottom-up pressure from nutrient enrichment is predicted to increase productivity, alter community structure, decrease biodiversity, and alter ecosystem functioning. Previous work supporting these predictions has been based largely on short-term, plot-level (e.g., 1-300 m(2) ) studies, which may miss landscape-level phenomena that drive ecosystem-level responses. We implemented an ecosystem-scale, nine-year nutrient experiment to examine how saltmarsh plants respond to simulated conditions of coastal eutrophication...
July 27, 2016: Ecological Applications: a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
Andrés Núñez, Guillermo Amo de Paz, Alberto Rastrojo, Ana M García, Antonio Alcamí, A Montserrat Gutiérrez-Bustillo, Diego A Moreno
The first part of this review ("Monitoring of airborne biological particles in outdoor atmosphere. Part 1: Importance, variability and ratios") describes the current knowledge on the major biological particles present in the air regarding their global distribution, concentrations, ratios and influence of meteorological factors in an attempt to provide a framework for monitoring their biodiversity and variability in such a singular environment as the atmosphere. Viruses, bacteria, fungi, pollen and fragments thereof are the most abundant microscopic biological particles in the air outdoors...
March 2016: International Microbiology: the Official Journal of the Spanish Society for Microbiology
Colin P Groves
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 19, 2016: Nature
Anna P Muir, Flavia L D Nunes, Stanislas F Dubois, Fabrice Pernet
Acclimation and adaptation, which are key to species survival in a changing climate, can be observed in terms of membrane lipid composition. Remodelling membrane lipids, via homeoviscous adaptation (HVA), counteracts membrane dysfunction due to temperature in poikilotherms. In order to assess the potential for acclimation and adaptation in the honeycomb worm, Sabellaria alveolata, a reef-building polychaete that supports high biodiversity, we carried out common-garden experiments using individuals from along its latitudinal range...
October 20, 2016: Scientific Reports
Guilhem Sommeria-Klein, Lucie Zinger, Pierre Taberlet, Eric Coissac, Jérôme Chave
The DNA present in the environment is a unique and increasingly exploited source of information for conducting fast and standardized biodiversity assessments for any type of organisms. The datasets resulting from these surveys are however rarely compared to the quantitative predictions of biodiversity models. In this study, we simulate neutral taxa-abundance datasets, and artificially noise them by simulating noise terms typical of DNA-based biodiversity surveys. The resulting noised taxa abundances are used to assess whether the two parameters of Hubbell's neutral theory of biodiversity can still be estimated...
October 20, 2016: Scientific Reports
Jonathan W Moore, Julian D Olden
Integrating knowledge of environmental degradation, biodiversity change, and ecosystem processes across large spatial scales remains a key challenge to illuminating the resilience of Earth's systems. There is now a growing realization that the manner in which communities will respond to anthropogenic impacts will ultimately control the ecosystem consequences. Here we examine the response of freshwater fishes and their nutrient excretion - a key ecosystem process that can control aquatic productivity - to human land development across the contiguous United States...
October 20, 2016: Global Change Biology
Eric Capo, Didier Debroas, Fabien Arnaud, Typhaine Guillemot, Vincent Bichet, Laurent Millet, Emilie Gauthier, Charly Massa, Anne-Lise Develle, Cécile Pignol, Franck Lejzerowicz, Isabelle Domaizon
Assessing the extent to which changes in lacustrine biodiversity are affected by anthropogenic or climatic forces requires extensive paleolimnological data. We used high-throughput sequencing to generate time-series data encompassing over 2200 years of microbial eukaryotes (protists and Fungi) diversity changes from the sedimentary DNA record of 2 lakes (Lake Bourget in French Alps and Lake Igaliku in Greenland). From 176 samples, we sequenced a large diversity of microbial eukaryotes, with a total 16 386 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) distributed within 50 phylogenetic groups...
October 20, 2016: Molecular Ecology
Vladimir Kozlov, Sergey Vakulenko, Uno Wennergren
This paper considers a model of foodwebs taking into account species extinction and invasion. We show that system stability depends not only on usual parameters (mortality rates, self-limitation coefficients, and resource abundances), but also on an additional parameter ("biodiversity potential"). The main result is as follows. For foodwebs with random parameters, we obtain an estimate of probability that the foodweb exposed to invasion survives. This estimate involves different system parameters, size and its topological properties...
October 19, 2016: Bulletin of Mathematical Biology
Jing Chen, Richard Dick, Jih-Gaw Lin, Ji-Dong Gu
Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) process uniquely links microbial nitrogen and carbon cycles. Research on n-damo bacteria progresses quickly with experimental evidences through enrichment cultures. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods for detecting them in various natural ecosystems and engineered systems play a very important role in the discovery of their distribution, abundance, and biodiversity in the ecosystems. Important characteristics of n-damo enrichments were obtained and their key significance in microbial nitrogen and carbon cycles was investigated...
October 20, 2016: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
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