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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28813450/oral-microbial-community-assembly-under-the-influence-of-periodontitis
#1
Hongju Chen, Shuting Peng, Lin Dai, Quan Zou, Bin Yi, Xianghong Yang, Zhanshan Sam Ma
Several ecological hypotheses (e.g., specific plaque, non-specific plaque and keystone pathogen) regarding the etiology of periodontitis have been proposed since the 1990s, most of which have been centered on the concept of dysbiosis associated with periodontitis. Nevertheless, none of the existing hypotheses have presented mechanistic interpretations on how and why dysbiosis actually occurs. Hubbell's neutral theory of biodiversity offers a powerful null model to test hypothesis regarding the mechanism of community assembly and diversity maintenance from the metagenomic sequencing data, which can help to understand the forces that shape the community dynamics such as dysbiosis...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28812706/a-decade-of-insights-into-grassland-ecosystem-responses-to-global-environmental-change
#2
REVIEW
Elizabeth T Borer, James B Grace, W Stanley Harpole, Andrew S MacDougall, Eric W Seabloom
Earth's biodiversity and carbon uptake by plants, or primary productivity, are intricately interlinked, underlie many essential ecosystem processes, and depend on the interplay among environmental factors, many of which are being changed by human activities. While ecological theory generalizes across taxa and environments, most empirical tests of factors controlling diversity and productivity have been observational, single-site experiments, or meta-analyses, limiting our understanding of variation among site-level responses and tests of general mechanisms...
April 20, 2017: Nature ecology & evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28812705/functional-trait-diversity-maximizes-ecosystem-multifunctionality
#3
Nicolas Gross, Yoann Le Bagousse-Pinguet, Pierre Liancourt, Miguel Berdugo, Nicholas J Gotelli, Fernando T Maestre
Understanding the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning has been a core ecological research topic over the past decades. Although a key hypothesis is that the diversity of functional traits determines ecosystem functioning, we do not know how much trait diversity is needed to maintain multiple ecosystem functions simultaneously (multifunctionality). Here, we uncovered a scaling relationship between the abundance distribution of two key plant functional traits (specific leaf area, maximum plant height) and multifunctionality in 124 dryland plant communities spread over all continents except Antarctica...
April 18, 2017: Nature ecology & evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28812698/urbanization-erodes-ectomycorrhizal-fungal-diversity-and-may-cause-microbial-communities-to-converge
#4
Dietrich J Epp Schmidt, Richard Pouyat, Katalin Szlavecz, Heikki Setälä, D Johan Kotze, Ian Yesilonis, Sarel Cilliers, Erzsébet Hornung, Miklós Dombos, Stephanie A Yarwood
Urbanization alters the physicochemical environment, introduces non-native species and causes ecosystem characteristics to converge. It has been speculated that these alterations contribute to loss of regional and global biodiversity, but so far most urban studies have assessed macro-organisms and reported mixed evidence for biodiversity loss. We studied five cities on three continents to assess the global convergence of urban soil microbial communities. We determined the extent to which communities of bacteria, archaea and fungi are geographically distributed, and to what extent urbanization acts as a filter on species diversity...
April 10, 2017: Nature ecology & evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28812691/a-macroecological-theory-of-microbial-biodiversity
#5
William R Shoemaker, Kenneth J Locey, Jay T Lennon
Microorganisms are the most abundant, diverse and functionally important organisms on Earth. Over the past decade, microbial ecologists have produced the largest ever community datasets. However, these data are rarely used to uncover law-like patterns of commonness and rarity, test theories of biodiversity, or explore unifying explanations for the structure of microbial communities. Using a global scale compilation of >20,000 samples from environmental, engineered and host-related ecosystems, we test the power of competing theories to predict distributions of microbial abundance and diversity-abundance scaling laws...
April 3, 2017: Nature ecology & evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28812675/spatial-complementarity-in-tree-crowns-explains-overyielding-in-species-mixtures
#6
Laura J Williams, Alain Paquette, Jeannine Cavender-Bares, Christian Messier, Peter B Reich
Deciphering the mechanisms that link biodiversity with ecosystem functions is critical to understanding the consequences of changes in biodiversity. The hypothesis that complementarity and selection effects drive relationships between biodiversity and ecosystem functions is well accepted, and an approach to statistically untangle the relative importance of these effects has been widely applied. In contrast, empirical demonstrations of the biological mechanisms that underlie these relationships remain rare. Here, on the basis of a field experiment with young trees, we provide evidence that one form of complementarity in plant communities-complementarity among crowns in canopy space-is a mechanism, related to light interception and use, that links biodiversity with ecosystem productivity...
March 1, 2017: Nature ecology & evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28812666/unknown-risks-to-soil-biodiversity-from-commercial-fungal-inoculants
#7
Miranda M Hart, Pedro M Antunes, Lynette K Abbott
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 23, 2017: Nature ecology & evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28812662/spending-limited-resources-on-de-extinction-could-lead-to-net-biodiversity-loss
#8
Joseph R Bennett, Richard F Maloney, Tammy E Steeves, James Brazill-Boast, Hugh P Possingham, Philip J Seddon
There is contentious debate surrounding the merits of de-extinction as a biodiversity conservation tool. Here, we use extant analogues to predict conservation actions for potential de-extinction candidate species from New Zealand and the Australian state of New South Wales, and use a prioritization protocol to predict the impacts of reintroducing and maintaining populations of these species on conservation of extant threatened species. Even using the optimistic assumptions that resurrection of species is externally sponsored, and that actions for resurrected species can share costs with extant analogue species, public funding for conservation of resurrected species would lead to fewer extant species that could be conserved, suggesting net biodiversity loss...
March 1, 2017: Nature ecology & evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28812661/human-population-growth-offsets-climate-driven-increase-in-woody-vegetation-in-sub-saharan-africa
#9
Martin Brandt, Kjeld Rasmussen, Josep Peñuelas, Feng Tian, Guy Schurgers, Aleixandre Verger, Ole Mertz, John R B Palmer, Rasmus Fensholt
The rapidly growing human population in sub-Saharan Africa generates increasing demand for agricultural land and forest products, which presumably leads to deforestation. Conversely, a greening of African drylands has been reported, but this has been difficult to associate with changes in woody vegetation. There is thus an incomplete understanding of how woody vegetation responds to socio-economic and environmental change. Here we used a passive microwave Earth observation data set to document two different trends in land area with woody cover for 1992-2011: 36% of the land area (6,870,000 km(2)) had an increase in woody cover largely in drylands, and 11% had a decrease (2,150,000 km(2)), mostly in humid zones...
March 6, 2017: Nature ecology & evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28812658/biodiversity-complementary-canopies
#10
Bernhard Schmid, Pascal A Niklaus
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 1, 2017: Nature ecology & evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28812637/spatial-conservation-prioritization-of-biodiversity-spanning-the-evolutionary-continuum
#11
Silvia B Carvalho, Guillermo Velo-Antón, Pedro Tarroso, Ana Paula Portela, Mafalda Barata, Salvador Carranza, Craig Moritz, Hugh P Possingham
Accounting for evolutionary relationships between and within species is important for biodiversity conservation planning, but is rarely considered in practice. Here we introduce a novel framework to identify priority conservation areas accounting for phylogenetic and intraspecific diversity, integrating concepts from phylogeny, phylogeography, spatial statistics and spatial conservation prioritization. The framework allows planners to incorporate and combine different levels of evolutionary diversity and can be applied to any taxonomic group and to any region in the world...
April 28, 2017: Nature ecology & evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28812633/diversity-begets-diversity-in-competition-for-space
#12
Daniel S Maynard, Mark A Bradford, Daniel L Lindner, Linda T A van Diepen, Serita D Frey, Jessie A Glaeser, Thomas W Crowther
Competition can profoundly affect biodiversity patterns by determining whether similar species are likely to coexist. When species compete directly for space, competitive ability differences should theoretically promote trait and phylogenetic clustering, provided that niche differences are otherwise minimal. Yet many sessile communities exhibit high biodiversity despite minimal reliance on niche differentiation. A potential explanation is that intransitive competition ('rock-paper-scissors' competition) not only promotes species richness but also fosters coexistence among highly dissimilar species with different competitive strategies...
May 15, 2017: Nature ecology & evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28812632/climate-warming-reduces-gut-microbiota-diversity-in-a-vertebrate-ectotherm
#13
Elvire Bestion, Staffan Jacob, Lucie Zinger, Lucie Di Gesu, Murielle Richard, Joël White, Julien Cote
Climate change is now considered to be the greatest threat to biodiversity and ecological networks, but its impacts on the bacterial communities associated with plants and animals remain largely unknown. Here, we studied the consequences of climate warming on the gut bacterial communities of an ectotherm, the common lizard (Zootoca vivipara), using a semi-natural experimental approach. We found that 2-3 °C warmer climates cause a 34% loss of populations' microbiota diversity, with possible negative consequences for host survival...
May 8, 2017: Nature ecology & evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28812625/larval-fish-dispersal-in-a-coral-reef-seascape
#14
Glenn R Almany, Serge Planes, Simon R Thorrold, Michael L Berumen, Michael Bode, Pablo Saenz-Agudelo, Mary C Bonin, Ashley J Frisch, Hugo B Harrison, Vanessa Messmer, Gerrit B Nanninga, Mark A Priest, Maya Srinivasan, Tane Sinclair-Taylor, David H Williamson, Geoffrey P Jones
Larval dispersal is a critical yet enigmatic process in the persistence and productivity of marine metapopulations. Empirical data on larval dispersal remain scarce, hindering the use of spatial management tools in efforts to sustain ocean biodiversity and fisheries. Here we document dispersal among subpopulations of clownfish (Amphiprion percula) and butterflyfish (Chaetodon vagabundus) from eight sites across a large seascape (10,000 km(2)) in Papua New Guinea across 2 years. Dispersal of clownfish was consistent between years, with mean observed dispersal distances of 15 km and 10 km in 2009 and 2011, respectively...
May 8, 2017: Nature ecology & evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28812606/global-marine-protected-areas-to-prevent-extinctions
#15
Lindsay N K Davidson, Nicholas K Dulvy
One goal of global marine protected areas (MPAs) is to ensure they represent a breadth of taxonomic biodiversity. Ensuring representation of species in MPAs, however, would require protecting vast areas of the global oceans and does not explicitly prioritize species of conservation concern. When threatened species are considered, a recent study found that only a small fraction of their geographic ranges are within the global MPA network. Which global marine areas, and what conservation actions beyond MPAs could be prioritized to prevent marine extinctions (Convention on Biological Diversity Aichi Target 12), remains unknown...
January 23, 2017: Nature ecology & evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28812604/stand-age-and-species-richness-dampen-interannual-variation-of-ecosystem-level-photosynthetic-capacity
#16
Talie Musavi, Mirco Migliavacca, Markus Reichstein, Jens Kattge, Christian Wirth, T Andrew Black, Ivan Janssens, Alexander Knohl, Denis Loustau, Olivier Roupsard, Andrej Varlagin, Serge Rambal, Alessandro Cescatti, Damiano Gianelle, Hiroaki Kondo, Rijan Tamrakar, Miguel D Mahecha
The total uptake of carbon dioxide by ecosystems via photosynthesis (gross primary productivity, GPP) is the largest flux in the global carbon cycle. A key ecosystem functional property determining GPP is the photosynthetic capacity at light saturation (GPPsat), and its interannual variability (IAV) is propagated to the net land-atmosphere exchange of CO2. Given the importance of understanding the IAV in CO2 fluxes for improving the predictability of the global carbon cycle, we have tested a range of alternative hypotheses to identify potential drivers of the magnitude of IAV in GPPsat in forest ecosystems...
January 23, 2017: Nature ecology & evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28812601/recent-extinctions-disturb-path-to-equilibrium-diversity-in-caribbean-bats
#17
Luis Valente, Rampal S Etienne, Liliana M Dávalos
Islands are ideal systems to model temporal changes in biodiversity and reveal the influence of humans on natural communities. Although theory predicts biodiversity on islands tends towards an equilibrium value, the recent extinction of large proportions of island biotas complicates testing this model. The well-preserved subfossil record of Caribbean bats-involving multiple insular radiations-provides a rare opportunity to model diversity dynamics in an insular community. Here, we reconstruct the diversity trajectory in noctilionoid bats of the Greater Antilles by applying a dynamic model of colonization, extinction and speciation to phylogenetic and palaeontological data including all known extinct and extant species...
January 9, 2017: Nature ecology & evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28812590/island-biodiversity-conservation-needs-palaeoecology
#18
Sandra Nogué, Lea de Nascimento, Cynthia A Froyd, Janet M Wilmshurst, Erik J de Boer, Emily E D Coffey, Robert J Whittaker, José María Fernández-Palacios, Kathy J Willis
The discovery and colonization of islands by humans has invariably resulted in their widespread ecological transformation. The small and isolated populations of many island taxa, and their evolution in the absence of humans and their introduced taxa, mean that they are particularly vulnerable to human activities. Consequently, even the most degraded islands are a focus for restoration, eradication, and monitoring programmes to protect the remaining endemic and/or relict populations. Here, we build a framework that incorporates an assessment of the degree of change from multiple baseline reference periods using long-term ecological data...
June 22, 2017: Nature ecology & evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28812589/connecting-earth-observation-to-high-throughput-biodiversity-data
#19
Alex Bush, Rahel Sollmann, Andreas Wilting, Kristine Bohmann, Beth Cole, Heiko Balzter, Christopher Martius, András Zlinszky, Sébastien Calvignac-Spencer, Christina A Cobbold, Terence P Dawson, Brent C Emerson, Simon Ferrier, M Thomas P Gilbert, Martin Herold, Laurence Jones, Fabian H Leendertz, Louise Matthews, James D A Millington, John R Olson, Otso Ovaskainen, Dave Raffaelli, Richard Reeve, Mark-Oliver Rödel, Torrey W Rodgers, Stewart Snape, Ingrid Visseren-Hamakers, Alfried P Vogler, Piran C L White, Martin J Wooster, Douglas W Yu
Understandably, given the fast pace of biodiversity loss, there is much interest in using Earth observation technology to track biodiversity, ecosystem functions and ecosystem services. However, because most biodiversity is invisible to Earth observation, indicators based on Earth observation could be misleading and reduce the effectiveness of nature conservation and even unintentionally decrease conservation effort. We describe an approach that combines automated recording devices, high-throughput DNA sequencing and modern ecological modelling to extract much more of the information available in Earth observation data...
June 22, 2017: Nature ecology & evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28812584/revisiting-the-biodiversity-ecosystem-multifunctionality-relationship
#20
Lars Gamfeldt, Fabian Roger
A recent and prominent claim for the value of biodiversity is its importance for sustaining multiple ecosystem functions. The general idea is intuitively appealing: since all species are to some extent unique, each will be important for a different set of functions. Therefore, as more functions are considered, a greater diversity of species is necessary to sustain all functions simultaneously. However, we show here that the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning does not change with the number of functions considered...
June 22, 2017: Nature ecology & evolution
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