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Acid-base disorders

Monique Mostert, Anthony Bonavia
BACKGROUND Besides providing anesthesia for surgery, the anesthesiologist's role is to optimize the patient for surgery and for post-surgical recovery. This involves timely identification and treatment of medical comorbidities and abnormal laboratory values that could complicate the patient's perioperative course. There are several potential causes of anion and non-anion gap metabolic acidosis in surgical patients, most of which could profoundly affect a patient's surgical outcome. Thus, the presence of an acute acid-base disturbance requires a thorough workup, the results of which will influence the patient's anesthetic management...
October 18, 2016: American Journal of Case Reports
Martin Kimmel, Mark Dominik Alscher
The regulation of the acid-base balance and pH is critical for the organism. The most important buffer system is CO2 / HCO3(-). The kidney controls systemic bicarbonate and therefore the metabolic regulation and the lung is relevant for respiratory regulation by an effective CO2 elimination. There are four acid-base disorders with two metabolic and two respiratory disorders (acidosis and alkalosis). The anion gap enables a further workup of metabolic acidosis.
October 2016: Deutsche Medizinische Wochenschrift
Enrique Jurado-Ruiz, Lourdes M Varela, Amparo Luque, Genoveva Berná, Gladys Cahuana, Enrique Martinez-Force, Rocío Gallego-Durán, Bernat Soria, Baukje de Roos, Manuel Romero Gómez, Franz Martín
SCOPE: We evaluated the protective effect of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) in high-fat diets (HFDs) on the inflammatory response and liver damage in a non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) mouse model. METHODS AND RESULTS: C57BL/6J mice fed a standard diet or a lard-based HFD (HFD-L) for 12 weeks to develop NAFLD. HFD fed mice were then divided into four groups and fed for 24 weeks with: HFD-L; HFD-EVOO; HFD-OL (phenolics-rich EVOO) and R (reversion; standard diet)...
October 17, 2016: Molecular Nutrition & Food Research
Chen Zhang, Cassandra L Miller, Rakshya Gorkhali, Juan Zou, Kenneth Huang, Edward M Brown, Jenny J Yang
Ca(2+)-sensing receptors (CaSRs) play a central role in regulating extracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]o) homeostasis and many (patho)physiological processes in multiple organs. This regulation is orchestrated by a cooperative response to extracellular stimuli such as small changes in Ca(2+), Mg(2+), amino acids, and other ligands. In addition, CaSR is a pleiotropic receptor regulating several intracellular signaling pathways, including calcium mobilization and intracellular calcium oscillation. Nearly 200 mutations and polymorphisms have been found in CaSR in relation to a variety of human disorders associated with abnormal Ca(2+) homeostasis...
2016: Frontiers in Physiology
Igor Slivac, David Guay, Mathias Mangion, Juliette Champeil, Bruno Gaillet
Delivery of nucleic acid-based molecules in human cells is a highly studied approach for the treatment of several disorders including monogenic diseases and cancers. Non-viral vectors for DNA and RNA transfer, although in general less efficient than virus-based systems, are particularly well adapted mostly due to the absence of biosafety concerns. Non-viral methods could be classified in two main groups: physical and vector-assisted delivery systems. Both groups comprise several different methods, none of them universally applicable...
October 14, 2016: Expert Opinion on Biological Therapy
Alessandra Lo Cicero, Anne-Laure Jaskowiak, Anne-Laure Egesipe, Johana Tournois, Benjamin Brinon, Patricia R Pitrez, Lino Ferreira, Annachiara de Sandre-Giovannoli, Nicolas Levy, Xavier Nissan
Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare fatal genetic disorder that causes systemic accelerated aging in children. Thanks to the pluripotency and self-renewal properties of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), HGPS iPSC-based modeling opens up the possibility of access to different relevant cell types for pharmacological approaches. In this study, 2800 small molecules were explored using high-throughput screening, looking for compounds that could potentially reduce the alkaline phosphatase activity of HGPS mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) committed into osteogenic differentiation...
October 14, 2016: Scientific Reports
M Balasubramanian, H Lord, S Levesque, H Guturu, F Thuriot, G Sillon, A M Wenger, D L Sureka, T Lester, D S Johnson, J Bowen, A R Calhoun, D H Viskochil, G Bejerano, J A Bernstein, D Chitayat
BACKGROUND: In 1993, Chitayat et al., reported a newborn with hyperphalangism, facial anomalies, and bronchomalacia. We identified three additional families with similar findings. Features include bilateral accessory phalanx resulting in shortened index fingers; hallux valgus; distinctive face; respiratory compromise. OBJECTIVES: To identify the genetic aetiology of Chitayat syndrome and identify a unifying cause for this specific form of hyperphalangism. METHODS: Through ongoing collaboration, we had collected patients with strikingly-similar phenotype...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Medical Genetics
M Lambert, V Niehaus, C Correll
This review aims to describe the importance of i) detecting individuals at clinical high-risk for psychosis (schizophrenia) or bipolar disorder, especially in children and adolescents, in order to enable early intervention, and ii) evaluating different intervention strategies, especially pharmacotherapy, during the subsyndromal or "prodromal" stages of these severe and often debilitating disorders. The different approaches regarding the psychotic and bipolar clinical high-risk state are discussed, including reasons and evidence for early (pharmacological) intervention and risks of treatment vs...
October 13, 2016: Pharmacopsychiatry
Neal K Bennett, Rebecca Chmielowski, Dalia S Abdelhamid, Jonathan J Faig, Nicola Francis, Jean Baum, Zhiping P Pang, Kathryn E Uhrich, Prabhas V Moghe
Neuroinflammation, a common neuropathologic feature of neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson disease (PD), is frequently exacerbated by microglial activation. The extracellular protein α-synuclein (ASYN), whose aggregation is characteristic of PD, remains a key therapeutic target, but the control of synuclein trafficking and aggregation within microglia has been challenging. First, we established that microglial internalization of monomeric ASYN was mediated by scavenger receptors (SR), CD36 and SRA1, and was rapidly accompanied by the formation of ASYN oligomers...
October 4, 2016: Biomaterials
Guozhu Ye, Yajie Chen, Hong-Ou Wang, Ting Ye, Yi Lin, Qiansheng Huang, Yulang Chi, Sijun Dong
Tetrabromobisphenol A and tetrachlorobisphenol A are halogenated bisphenol A (H-BPA), and has raised concerns about their adverse effects on the development of fetuses and infants, however, the molecular mechanisms are unclear, and related metabolomics studies are limited. Accordingly, a metabolomics study based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was employed to elucidate the molecular developmental toxicology of H-BPA using the marine medaka (Oryzias melastigmas) embryo model. Here, we revealed decreased synthesis of nucleosides, amino acids and lipids, and disruptions in the TCA (tricarboxylic acid) cycle, glycolysis and lipid metabolism, thus inhibiting the developmental processes of embryos exposed to H-BPA...
October 13, 2016: Scientific Reports
Wade F Zeno, Kaitlin E Johnson, Darryl Y Sasaki, Subhash H Risbud, Marjorie L Longo
We use fluorescence microscopy to examine the dynamics of the crowding-induced mixing transition of liquid ordered (Lo)-liquid disordered (Ld) phase separated lipid bilayers when the following particles of increasing size bind to either the Lo or Ld phase: Ubiquitin, green fluorescent protein (GFP), and nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs) of two diameters. These proteinaceous particles contained histidine-tags, which were phase targeted by binding to iminodiacetic acid (IDA) head groups, via a Cu2+ chelating mechanism, of lipids that specifically partition into either the Lo phase or Ld phase...
October 10, 2016: Journal of Physical Chemistry. B
Mayuree Kanlayavattanakul, Nattaya Lourith, Puxvadee Chaikul
ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: While rice is one of the most important global staple food sources its extracts have found many uses as the bases of herbal remedies. Rice extracts contain high levels of phenolic compounds which are known to be bioactive, some of which show cutaneous benefits and activity towards skin disorders. This study highlights an assessment of the cellular activity and clinical efficacy of rice panicle extract, providing necessary information relevant to the development of new cosmetic products...
October 6, 2016: Journal of Ethnopharmacology
Taylor Wand, Mike Fang, Christina Chen, Nathan Hardy, J Philip McCoy, Bogdan Dumitriu, Neal S Young, Angélique Biancotto
Abnormal telomere lengths have been linked to cancer and other hematologic disorders. Determination of mean telomere content (MTC) is traditionally performed by Southern blotting and densitometry, giving a mean telomere restriction fragment (TRF) value for the total cell population studied. Here, we compared a quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction approach (qPCR) and a flow cytometric approach, fluorescence in situ hybridization (Flow-FISH), to evaluate telomere content distribution in total patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells or specific cell populations...
September 22, 2016: Cytometry. Part A: the Journal of the International Society for Analytical Cytology
Shu-Ying Li, Ting Chen, Lin Wang, Dong Wang, Li-Jun Wan
Understanding the mechanism in chiral transmission from a single molecule to a supramolecular level is fundamentally important to decipher the nonlinear amplification effect in the two-dimensional (2D) chiral assembly process. In this contribution, we report on the dramatically different nonlinear amplification effect in the chiral co-adsorber induced homochiral assemblies constructed by a series of homologous achiral building blocks on the graphite surface under control of the majority-rules principle. Homologous hexagonal networks are formed for 5-(benzyloxy)-isophthalic acid (BIC) derivatives with different alkyl lengths...
October 6, 2016: Nanoscale
Sourav RoyChoudhury, Biswa Prasanna Mishra, Tila Khan, Ratna Chattopadhayay, Indrani Lodh, Chaitali Datta Ray, Gunja Bose, Himadri S Sarkar, Sudha Srivastava, Mamata V Joshi, Baidyanath Chakravarty, Koel Chaudhury
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most commonly occurring metabolic and endocrinological disorders affecting women of reproductive age. Metabolomics is an emerging field that holds promise in understanding disease pathophysiology. Recently, a few metabolomics based studies have been attempted in PCOS patients; however, none of them have included patients from the Indian population. The main objective of this study was to investigate the serum metabolomic profile of Indian women with PCOS and compare them with controls...
September 15, 2016: Molecular BioSystems
Z Zhang, Z Xu, Y Dai, Y Chen
Homocysteine is an amino acid that is produced from the metabolic demethylation of dietary methionine. It has gained arising attention for its association with increased risk of myocardial infarction, stroke and venous thromboembolism. Erectile dysfunction (ED), especially for vasculogenic ED, is a vascular disorder of cavernosal vascular bed. In this prospective pilot case-control study, we investigated plasma homocysteine levels in 32 ED patients and 20 healthy control men. Related patients characteristics including age, weight, height, marital status, smoking and drinking status, level of education were collected and analysed as well as penile colour Doppler ultrasound parameters...
October 6, 2016: Andrologia
Andrew T Placzek, Skylar J Ferrara, Meredith D Hartley, Hannah S Sanford-Crane, J Matthew Meinig, Thomas S Scanlan
There is currently great interest in developing drugs that stimulate myelin repair for use in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Thyroid hormone plays a key role in stimulating myelination during development and also controls the expression of important genes involved in myelin repair in adults. Because endogenous thyroid hormone in excess lacks a generally useful therapeutic index, it is not used clinically for indications other than hormone replacement; however, selective thyromimetics such as sobetirome offer a therapeutic alternative...
September 16, 2016: Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry
Qurrat U Ain, Robert M Owen, Kiyoyuki Omoto, Rubben Torella, Krishna C Bulusu, David C Pryde, Robert C Glen, Julian E Fuchs, Andreas Bender
Selective modulators of the γ-amino butyric acid (GABAA) family of receptors have the potential to treat a range of disease states related to cognition, pain and anxiety. While the development of various α subunit-selective modulators is currently underway for the treatment of anxiety disorders, the mechanistic understanding of the correlation between their bioactivity and efficacy, based on ligand-target interactions, is currently still lacking. In order to alleviate this situation, in the current study we have analyzed, using ligand-based and structure-based methods, a dataset of 5,440 GABAA modulators...
October 5, 2016: Molecular Pharmaceutics
Jiang Xie, Bin Wang, Lian Wang, Fang Dong, Gang Bai, Yongjun Liu
BACKGROUND Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is one severe subtype of stroke, with a very complex pathology. Stem cell-based therapy holds promising potential in the treatment of neurological disorders. Human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) have a therapeutic effect in recovery from brain damage following ICH. The aim of this study was to identify an effective and convenient way of using UC-MSCs in the ICH rat model. MATERIAL AND METHODS CM-DiI-labeled human UC-MSCs were transplanted intracerebrally or intravenously into collagenase VII-induced ICH rat models...
October 5, 2016: Medical Science Monitor: International Medical Journal of Experimental and Clinical Research
Bijoyita Roy, Westley J Friesen, Yuki Tomizawa, John D Leszyk, Jin Zhuo, Briana Johnson, Jumana Dakka, Christopher R Trotta, Xiaojiao Xue, Venkateshwar Mutyam, Kim M Keeling, James A Mobley, Steven M Rowe, David M Bedwell, Ellen M Welch, Allan Jacobson
A premature termination codon (PTC) in the ORF of an mRNA generally leads to production of a truncated polypeptide, accelerated degradation of the mRNA, and depression of overall mRNA expression. Accordingly, nonsense mutations cause some of the most severe forms of inherited disorders. The small-molecule drug ataluren promotes therapeutic nonsense suppression and has been thought to mediate the insertion of near-cognate tRNAs at PTCs. However, direct evidence for this activity has been lacking. Here, we expressed multiple nonsense mutation reporters in human cells and yeast and identified the amino acids inserted when a PTC occupies the ribosomal A site in control, ataluren-treated, and aminoglycoside-treated cells...
October 4, 2016: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
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