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developmental origins of health and disease

Bénazir Siddeek, Nadjem Lakhdari, Lilia Inoubli, Rachel Paul-Bellon, Véronique Isnard, Emmanuelle Thibault, André Bongain, Daniel Chevalier, Emanuela Repetto, Michele Trabucchi, Jean-François Michiels, Catherine Yzydorczyk, Umberto Simeoni, Michel Urtizberea, Claire Mauduit, Mohamed Benahmed
AIM: The Developmental Origin of Health and Disease refers to the concept that early exposure to toxicants or nutritional imbalances during perinatal life induces changes that enhance the risk of developing noncommunicable diseases in adulthood. Patients/materials & methods: An experimental model with an adult chronic germ cell phenotype resulting from exposure to a xenoestrogen was used. RESULTS: A reciprocal negative feedback loop involving decreased EZH2 protein level and increased miR-101 expression was identified...
October 20, 2016: Epigenomics
Sarah Schalekamp-Timmermans, Jerome Cornette, Albert Hofman, Willem A Helbing, Vincent W V Jaddoe, Eric A P Steegers, Bero O Verburg
BACKGROUND: There are sex differences in the risk of development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). According to the developmental origins of health and disease paradigm (DOHaD), CVD originates in fetal life. This study examines fetal sex differences in cardiovascular development in utero. METHODS: In 1028 pregnant women, we assessed fetal circulation using pulsed wave Doppler examinations between 28 and 34 weeks gestation. To test associations between fetal sex and fetal circulation measurements, linear regression models were used adjusting for fetal size, gestational age, and fetal heart rate...
2016: Biology of Sex Differences
Stephanie Romanus, Patrick Neven, Adelheid Soubry
The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) theory focuses on the consequences of periconceptional and in utero exposures. A wide range of environmental conditions during early development are now being investigated as a driving force for epigenetic disruptions that enhance disease risk in later life, including cardiovascular, metabolic, endocrine, and mental disorders and even breast cancer. Most studies involve mother-child dyads, with less focus on environmental influences through the father...
October 12, 2016: Breast Cancer Research: BCR
Hideoki Fukuoka, Fumihiro Sata
Epigenetic modification takes place in many types of environment. Undesirable epigenetic changes for the postnatal life at the developmental stage are induced in utero by exposure to harsh environment such as endocrine disruptors, severe psychological stress and insufficient or excessive nutrition. Some of these changes continues even for a long time after birth from womb to tomb. Under these circumstances with an unhealthy life style, such as higher caloric intake, insufficient exercise, or stress, there is a higher risk of developing various illnesses including lifestyle-related diseases, such as essential hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, psychological disorders and cancers...
2016: Nihon Eiseigaku Zasshi. Japanese Journal of Hygiene
Gene H Brody, Tianyi Yu, Steven R H Beach
For the past quarter century, scientists at the Center for Family Research at the University of Georgia have conducted research designed to promote understanding of normative developmental trajectories among low socioeconomic status African American children, youths, and young adults. In this paper, we describe a recent expansion of this research program using longitudinal, epidemiological studies and randomized prevention trials to test hypotheses about the origins of disease among rural African American youths...
October 3, 2016: Development and Psychopathology
H Dickinson, T J Moss, K L Gatford, K M Moritz, L Akison, T Fullston, D H Hryciw, C A Maloney, M J Morris, A L Wooldridge, J E Schjenken, S A Robertson, B J Waddell, P J Mark, C S Wyrwoll, S J Ellery, K L Thornburg, B S Muhlhausler, J L Morrison
Epidemiology formed the basis of 'the Barker hypothesis', the concept of 'developmental programming' and today's discipline of the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD). Animal experimentation provided proof of the underlying concepts, and continues to generate knowledge of underlying mechanisms. Interventions in humans, based on DOHaD principles, will be informed by experiments in animals. As knowledge in this discipline has accumulated, from studies of humans and other animals, the complexity of interactions between genome, environment and epigenetics, has been revealed...
October 2016: Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease
Jay Belsky, Idan Shalev
Two independent lines of inquiry suggest that growing up under conditions of contextual adversity (e.g., poverty and household chaos) accelerates aging and undermines long-term health. Whereas work addressing the developmental origins of health and disease highlights accelerated-aging effects of contextual adversity on telomere erosion, that informed by an evolutionary analysis of reproductive strategies highlights such effects with regard to pubertal development (in females). That both shorter telomeres early in life and earlier age of menarche are associated with poor health later in life raises the prospect, consistent with evolutionary life-history theory, that these two bodies of theory and research are tapping into the same evolutionary-developmental process whereby longer term health costs are traded off for increased probability of reproducing before dying via a process of accelerated aging...
September 30, 2016: Development and Psychopathology
Derrick M Chu, Kristen M Meyer, Amanda L Prince, Kjersti M Aagaard
Evidence supporting the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease Hypothesis indicates that maternal nutrition in pregnancy has a significant impact on offspring disease risk later in life, likely by modulating developmental processes in utero. Gut microbiota have recently been explored as a potential mediating factor, as dietary components strongly influence microbiota abundance, function and its impact on host physiology. A growing body of evidence has additionally indicated that the intrauterine environment is not sterile as once presumed, indicating that maternal-fetal transmission of microbiota may occur during pregnancy...
September 29, 2016: Gut Microbes
M B Azad, B L Moyce, L Guillemette, C D Pascoe, B Wicklow, J M McGavock, A J Halayko, V W Dolinsky
Diabetes is an increasingly common complication of pregnancy. In parallel with this trend, a rise in chronic lung disease in children has been observed in recent decades. While several adverse health outcomes associated with exposure to diabetes in utero have been documented in epidemiological and experimental studies, few have examined the impact of diabetes in pregnancy on offspring lung health and respiratory disease. We provide a comprehensive overview of current literature on this topic, finding suggestive evidence that exposure to diabetes in utero may have adverse effects on lung development...
August 19, 2016: Paediatric Respiratory Reviews
L Yamada, S Chong
The field of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) seeks to understand the relationships between early-life environmental exposures and long-term health and disease. Until recently, the molecular mechanisms underlying these phenomena were poorly understood; however, epigenetics has been proposed to bridge the gap between the environment and phenotype. Epigenetics involves the study of heritable changes in gene expression, which occur without changes to the underlying DNA sequence. Different types of epigenetic modifications include DNA methylation, post-translational histone modifications and non-coding RNAs...
September 9, 2016: Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease
S A Johnson, A B Javurek, M S Painter, C R Murphy, C M Conard, K L Gant, E C Howald, M R Ellersieck, C E Wiedmeyer, V J Vieira-Potter, C S Rosenfeld
Maternal diet-induced obesity can cause detrimental developmental origins of health and disease in offspring. Perinatal exposure to a high-fat diet (HFD) can lead to later behavioral and metabolic disturbances, but it is not clear which behaviors and metabolic parameters are most vulnerable. To address this critical gap, biparental and monogamous oldfield mice (Peromyscus polionotus), which may better replicate most human societies, were used in the current study. About 2 weeks before breeding, adult females were placed on a control or HFD and maintained on the diets throughout gestation and lactation...
September 9, 2016: Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease
Huali Wu, Junyi Feng, Wenting Lv, Qiaoling Huang, Mengsi Fu, Minxuan Cai, Qiangqiang He, Jing Shang
Dermatosis often as a chronic disease requires effective long-term treatment; a comprehensive evaluation of mental health of dermatology drug does not receive enough attention. An interaction between dermatology and psychiatry has been increasingly described. Substantial evidence has accumulated that psychological stress can be associated with pigmentation, endocrine and immune systems in skin to create the optimal responses against pathogens and other physicochemical stressors to maintain or restore internal homeostasis...
2016: PloS One
Sonja Entringer, Claudia Buss, Christine Heim
BACKGROUND: The rapidly growing research field of developmental programming of health and disease risk investigates the early life origins of individual vulnerability for common, complex disorders that confer a major burden of disease. OBJECTIVES: The present article introduces the concept of developmental programming of disease vulnerability and summarizes studies on the mental and physical health consequences of exposure to childhood trauma and prenatal stress...
October 2016: Bundesgesundheitsblatt, Gesundheitsforschung, Gesundheitsschutz
C S Rosenfeld
Abundant evidence exists linking maternal and paternal environments from pericopconception through the postnatal period to later risk to offspring diseases. This concept was first articulated by the late Sir David Barker and as such coined the Barker Hypothesis. The term was then mutated to Fetal Origins of Adult Disease and finally broadened to developmental origins of adult health and disease (DOHaD) in recognition that the perinatal environment can shape both health and disease in resulting offspring. Developmental exposure to various factors, including stress, obesity, caloric-rich diets and environmental chemicals can lead to detrimental offspring health outcomes...
August 31, 2016: Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease
R J Van Lieshout, J E Krzeczkowski
Optimal early cognitive and emotional development are vital to reaching one's full potential and represent our best chance to improve the mental health of the population. The developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD) hypothesis posits that adverse perinatal exposures can alter physiology and increase disease risk. As physiological plasticity decreases with age, interventions applied during gestation may hold the most promise for reducing the impact of mental disorders across the lifespan. However, this vast clinical potential remains largely unrealized as the majority of human DOHaD research is observational in nature...
August 30, 2016: Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease
Stefano Tarantini, Cory B Giles, Jonathan D Wren, Nicole M Ashpole, M Noa Valcarcel-Ares, Jeanne Y Wei, William E Sonntag, Zoltan Ungvari, Anna Csiszar
Epidemiological findings support the concept of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, suggesting that early-life hormonal influences during a sensitive period of development have a fundamental impact on vascular health later in life. The endocrine changes that occur during development are highly conserved across mammalian species and include dramatic increases in circulating IGF-1 levels during adolescence. The present study was designed to characterize the effect of developmental IGF-1 deficiency on the vascular aging phenotype...
August 2016: Age (2005-)
Sky Feuer, Paolo Rinaudo
Human in vitro fertilization (IVF) as a treatment for infertility is regarded as one of the most outstanding accomplishments of the 20th century, and its use has grown dramatically since the late 1970s. Although IVF is considered safe and the majority of children appear healthy, reproductive technologies have been viewed with some skepticism since the in vitro environment deviates substantially from that in vivo. This is increasingly significant because the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) hypothesis has illuminated the sensitivity of an organism to its environment at critical stages during development, including how suboptimal exposures restricted specifically to gamete maturation or the preimplantation period can affect postnatal growth, glucose metabolism, fat deposition, and vascular function...
August 9, 2016: Healthcare (Basel, Switzerland)
Caroline V Sartain, Patricia A Hunt
The concept that developmental events shape adult health and disease was sparked by the recognition of a link between maternal undernutrition and coronary disease in adults. From that beginning, a new field-the developmental origins of health and disease-emerged, and attention has focused on the effects of a wide array of developmental perturbations. Exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals has been of particular interest, and a ubiquitous environmental contaminant bisphenol A (BPA) has become the endocrine-disrupting chemical poster child...
September 15, 2016: Fertility and Sterility
Elena Loche, Susan E Ozanne
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Here, we provide a summary of the current knowledge on the impact of early life nutrition on cardiovascular diseases that have emerged from studies in humans and experimental animal models. The involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease will be discussed in relation to the implications for the heart and the cardiovascular system. RECENT FINDINGS: Environmental cues, such as parental diet and a suboptimal in utero environment can shape growth and development, causing long-lasting cardiometabolic perturbations...
October 2016: Current Opinion in Lipidology
Maria-Eleni Chovalopoulou, Christina Papageorgopoulou, Andreas Bertsatos
The aim of this paper is to evaluate and quantify cranium asymmetry, sexual differences in the set of individual asymmetry scores, and the relationship between fluctuating asymmetry and age, in a modern Greek population sample. In addition, we test for the developmental origins of health and disease hypothesis by assessing the correlation between fluctuating asymmetry and cause of death. The study sample consisted of 173 crania of known sex and adult age (92 males, 81 females) belonging to individuals who lived in Greece during the twentieth century...
August 3, 2016: International Journal of Legal Medicine
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