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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28345948/the-impact-of-cross-modal-correspondences-on-working-memory-performance
#1
Riccardo Brunetti, Allegra Indraccolo, Serena Mastroberardino, Charles Spence, Valerio Santangelo
Cross-modal correspondences influence perceptual performance in adults, infants, and even nonhuman primates across a variety of different sensory modalities, including tasks involving speeded detection and categorization. However, to date, it is still unclear whether and how correspondences could modulate post-perceptual processes, such as working memory (WM). We investigated this issue using an audiovisual two-back task. In Experiment 1, 3 kinds of correspondences were used: audio/visual numerosity, pitch/shape, and pitch/elevation, each presented congruently (e...
April 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28343239/improved-full-length-killer-cell-immunoglobulin-like-receptor-transcript-discovery-in-mauritian-cynomolgus-macaques
#2
Trent M Prall, Michael E Graham, Julie A Karl, Roger W Wiseman, Adam J Ericsen, Muthuswamy Raveendran, R Alan Harris, Donna M Muzny, Richard A Gibbs, Jeffrey Rogers, David H O'Connor
Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) modulate disease progression of pathogens including HIV, malaria, and hepatitis C. Cynomolgus and rhesus macaques are widely used as nonhuman primate models to study human pathogens, and so, considerable effort has been put into characterizing their KIR genetics. However, previous studies have relied on cDNA cloning and Sanger sequencing that lack the throughput of current sequencing platforms. In this study, we present a high throughput, full-length allele discovery method utilizing Pacific Biosciences circular consensus sequencing (CCS)...
March 25, 2017: Immunogenetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28343228/focal-brain-injury-associated-with-a-model-of-severe-hypoxic-ischemic-encephalopathy-in-nonhuman-primates
#3
Ryan M McAdams, Ronald J McPherson, Raj P Kapur, Sandra E Juul
Worldwide, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a major cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity. To better understand the mechanisms contributing to brain injury and improve outcomes in neonates with HIE, better preclinical animal models that mimic the clinical situation following birth asphyxia in term newborns are needed. In an effort to achieve this goal, we modified our nonhuman primate model of HIE induced by in utero umbilical cord occlusion (UCO) to include postnatal hypoxic episodes, in order to simulate apneic events in human neonates with HIE...
March 25, 2017: Developmental Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28342320/mitigating-hypoxic-stress-on-pancreatic-islets-via-in-situ-oxygen-generating-biomaterial
#4
Maria M Coronel, Ryan Geusz, Cherie L Stabler
A major obstacle in the survival and efficacy of tissue engineered transplants is inadequate oxygenation, whereby unsupportive oxygen tensions result in significant cellular dysfunction and death within the implant. In a previous report, we developed an innovative oxygen generating biomaterial, termed OxySite, to provide supportive in situ oxygenation to cells and prevent hypoxia-induced damage. Herein, we explored the capacity of this biomaterial to mitigate hypoxic stress in both rat and nonhuman primate pancreatic islets by decreasing cell death, supporting metabolic activity, sustaining aerobic metabolism, preserving glucose responsiveness, and decreasing the generation of inflammatory cytokines...
March 18, 2017: Biomaterials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28341944/discriminative-stimulus-effects-of-psychostimulants
#5
Michael D Berquist, William E Fantegrossi
Numerous drugs elicit locomotor stimulant effects at appropriate doses; however, we typically reserve the term psychostimulant to refer to drugs with affinity for monoamine reuptake transporters. This chapter comprises select experiments that have characterized the discriminative stimulus effects of psychostimulants using drug discrimination procedures. The substitution profiles of psychostimulants in laboratory rodents are generally consistent with those observed in human and nonhuman primate drug discrimination experiments...
March 25, 2017: Current Topics in Behavioral Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28338530/pharmacologic-characterizations-of-a-p2x7-receptor-specific-radioligand-11c-gsk1482160-for-neuroinflammatory-response
#6
Junbin Han, Hui Liu, Chunling Liu, Hongjun Jin, Joel S Perlmutter, Terrance M Egan, Zhude Tu
OBJECTIVE: The P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) is a key regulatory element in the neuroinflammatory cascade that provides a promising target for imaging neuroinflammation. GSK1482160, a P2X7R modulator with nanomolar binding affinity and high selectivity, has been successfully radiolabeled and utilized for imaging P2X7 levels in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide-induced systemic inflammation. In the current study, we further characterized its binding profile and determined whether [C]GSK1482160 can detect changes in P2X7R expression in a rodent model of multiple sclerosis...
March 23, 2017: Nuclear Medicine Communications
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28334082/decoding-grasping-movements-from-the-parieto-frontal-reaching-circuit-in-the-nonhuman-primate
#7
Koen Nelissen, Prosper Agbesi Fiave, Wim Vanduffel
Prehension movements typically include a reaching phase, guiding the hand toward the object, and a grip phase, shaping the hand around it. The dominant view posits that these components rely upon largely independent parieto-frontal circuits: a dorso-medial circuit involved in reaching and a dorso-lateral circuit involved in grasping. However, mounting evidence suggests a more complex arrangement, with dorso-medial areas contributing to both reaching and grasping. To investigate the role of the dorso-medial reaching circuit in grasping, we trained monkeys to reach-and-grasp different objects in the dark and determined if hand configurations could be decoded from functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) responses obtained from the reaching and grasping circuits...
February 18, 2017: Cerebral Cortex
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28333238/clustering-of-pcos-like-traits-in-naturally-hyperandrogenic-female-rhesus-monkeys
#8
D H Abbott, B H Rayome, D A Dumesic, K C Lewis, A K Edwards, K Wallen, M E Wilson, S E Appt, J E Levine
STUDY QUESTION: Do naturally occurring, hyperandrogenic (≥1 SD of population mean testosterone, T) female rhesus monkeys exhibit traits typical of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)? SUMMARY ANSWER: Hyperandrogenic female monkeys exhibited significantly increased serum levels of androstenedione (A4), 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP), estradiol (E2), LH, antimullerian hormone (AMH), cortisol, 11-deoxycortisol and corticosterone, as well as increased uterine endometrial thickness and evidence of reduced fertility, all traits associated with PCOS...
March 1, 2017: Human Reproduction
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28330415/novel-detection-of-placental-insufficiency-by-magnetic-resonance-imaging-in-the-nonhuman-primate
#9
Jamie O Lo, Victoria H J Roberts, Matthias C Schabel, Xiaojie Wang, Terry K Morgan, Zheng Liu, Colin Studholme, Christopher D Kroenke, Antonio E Frias
The placenta is a vital organ necessary for healthy fetal development. Placental insufficiency creates an in utero environment where the fetus is at risk of insufficient oxygen or nutrient exchange. This is primarily caused by impairment of either maternal or fetal circulation or vascular thrombosis such as placental infarction. As a result of placental dysfunction, affected fetuses may be growth restricted, neurologically impaired, and at risk of increased morbidity and mortality. In a cohort of 4 pregnant Rhesus macaques, we describe antenatal detection of naturally occurring intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and aberrant fetal neurodevelopment in 1 animal...
January 1, 2017: Reproductive Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28326445/the-role-of-nonhuman-primate-models-in-the-development-of-cell-based-therapies-for-parkinson-s-disease
#10
REVIEW
Scott C Vermilyea, Marina E Emborg
Through the course of over three decades, nonhuman primate (NHP) studies on cell-based therapies (CBTs) for Parkinson's disease (PD) have provided insight into the feasibility, safety and efficacy of the approach, methods of cell collection and preparation, cell viability, as well as potential brain targets. Today, NHP research continues to be a vital source of information for improving cell grafts and analyzing how the host affects graft survival, integration and function. Overall, this article aims to discuss the role that NHP models of PD have played in CBT development and highlights specific issues that need to be considered to maximize the value of NHP studies for the successful clinical translation of CBTs...
March 22, 2017: Journal of Neural Transmission
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28324647/metabolism-and-distribution-of-clozapine-n-oxide-implications-for-nonhuman-primate-chemogenetics
#11
Jessica Raper, J Scott Daniels, Ryan D Morrison, Leonard Howell, Jocelyne Bachevalier, Thomas Wichmann, Adriana Galvan
The use of Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs (DREADDs) in neuroscience has rapidly expanded in rodent studies, but has lagged behind in nonhuman primate (NHP) experiments, slowing the development of this method for therapeutic use in humans. One reason for the slow adoption of DREADD technology in primates is that the pharmacokinetic properties and bioavailability of clozapine-n-oxide (CNO), the most commonly used ligand for human muscarinic (hM) DREADDs, are not fully described in primates...
March 21, 2017: ACS Chemical Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28324014/variation-in-the-insulin-like-growth-factor-1-gene-in-primates
#12
Peter Rotwein
Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) is a multifunctional peptide that is involved in a wide range of physiological and patho-physiological processes in many animal species, ranging from somatic growth in children to metabolism, and tissue regeneration and repair in adults. The IGF1 gene is under multifactorial regulation in the few species in which it has been studied, with major control being exerted by growth hormone (GH) through a gene expression pathway involving inducible binding of the STAT5b transcription factor to dispersed enhancer elements...
January 18, 2017: Endocrinology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28323577/mitigation-of-radiation-induced-epithelial-damage-by-the-tlr5-agonist-entolimod-in-a-mouse-model-of-fractionated-head-and-neck-irradiation
#13
Ilia A Toshkov, Anatoli S Gleiberman, Vadim L Mett, Alan D Hutson, Anurag K Singh, Andrei V Gudkov, Lyudmila G Burdelya
Radiation treatment of head and neck cancer frequently causes severe collateral damage to normal tissues including mouth mucosa, salivary glands and skin. This toxicity limits the radiation dose that can be delivered and affects the patient's quality of life. Previous studies in mice and nonhuman primates showed that entolimod, a toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) agonist derived from bacterial flagellin, effectively reduced radiation damage to hematopoietic and gastrointestinal tissues in both total-body and local irradiation scenarios, with no protection of tumors...
March 21, 2017: Radiation Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28322428/xenotransplantation-where-do-we-stand-in-2016
#14
Gisella L Puga Yung, Robert Rieben, Leo Bühler, Henk-Jan Schuurman, Jörg Seebach
Worldwide, there is a constant rise in the number of patients with end-stage organ failure in critical need for transplants, but the number of organs/cells available from deceased or living human donors is limited. Xenotransplantation using pig organs/tissues repre-sents a potential solution for this shortage; however, it has been hampered by a number of mainly immuno-logical hurdles. Remarkable progress was presented at the latest biennial (13th) international congress of the International Xenotransplantation Association, November 2015 in Melbourne, Australia, and the American Transplant Congress, May 2016 in Boston, USA...
March 21, 2017: Swiss Medical Weekly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28320968/numerosity-representation-is-encoded-in-human-subcortex
#15
Elliot Collins, Joonkoo Park, Marlene Behrmann
Certain numerical abilities appear to be relatively ubiquitous in the animal kingdom, including the ability to recognize and differentiate relative quantities. This skill is present in human adults and children, as well as in nonhuman primates and, perhaps surprisingly, is also demonstrated by lower species such as mosquitofish and spiders, despite the absence of cortical computation available to primates. This ubiquity of numerical competence suggests that representations that connect to numerical tasks are likely subserved by evolutionarily conserved regions of the nervous system...
March 20, 2017: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28320845/decoding-information-for-grasping-from-the-macaque-dorsomedial-visual-stream
#16
Matteo Filippini, Rossella Breveglieri, M Ali Akhras, Annalisa Bosco, Eris Chinellato, Patrizia Fattori
Neuro-decoders have been developed by researchers mostly to control neuro-prosthetic devices, but also to shed new light on neural functions. In this study, we show that signals representing grip configurations can be reliably decoded from neural data acquired from area V6A of the monkey medial posterior parietal cortex (PPC). Two Macaca fascicularis were trained to perform an instructed-delay reach-to-grasp task in the dark and in the light towards objects of different shapes. Population neural activity was extracted at various time intervals; on vision of the objects, the delay before movement, and grasp execution...
March 20, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28302841/nonhuman-primates-model-language-evolution
#17
EDITORIAL
Julia Fahrenkamp-Uppenbrink
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 17, 2017: Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28299780/age-related-changes-of-sulcal-imprints-on-the-endocranium-in-the-japanese-macaque-macaca-fuscata
#18
Nguyen Van Minh, Yuzuru Hamada
OBJECTIVES: The degree of expression of sulcal patterns on endocasts of nonhuman primates has been shown to depend primarily on species (brain size) and age of the individual. It has been suggested that brain details on endocasts are reproduced better in juvenile than adult primates. Here, we investigated age-related changes in the imprint of the major sulci on the endocranium of Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) from the juvenile period to adulthood. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Using CT scans of 25 (12 males, 13 females) cranial specimens from macaques, we generated virtual endocasts to assess imprints of the seven main sulci on the endocranial surface...
March 16, 2017: American Journal of Physical Anthropology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28298815/ethical-guidelines-animal-profile-various-animal-models-used-in-periodontal-research-with-alternatives-and-future-perspectives
#19
REVIEW
Mohan Kumar Pasupuleti, Subramanya Shetty Molahally, Supraja Salwaji
Laboratory animal models serve as a facilitator to investigate the etiopathogenesis of periodontal disease, are used to know the efficacy of reconstructive and regenerative procedures, and are also helpful in evaluation of newer therapeutic techniques including laser and implant therapies prior to application in the human beings. The aim of this review is to know the different animal models used in various specialties of dental research and to know the ethical guidelines prior to the usage of experimental models with main emphasis on how to refine, replace, and reduce the number of animal models usage in the laboratory...
July 2016: Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28298291/plasmablast-response-to-primary-rhesus-cytomegalovirus-infection-in-a-monkey-model-of-congenital-cmv-transmission
#20
Qihua Fan, Cody S Nelson, Kristy M Bialas, Flavia Chiuppesi, Joshua Amos, Thaddeus C Gurley, Dawn Jones Marshall, Joshua Eudailey, Holly Heimsath, Jonathon Himes, Ashlesha Deshpande, Mark R Walter, Felix Wussow, Don J Diamond, Peter A Barry, M Anthony Moody, Amitinder Kaur, Sallie R Permar
Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the most common congenital infection worldwide, and the leading infectious cause of neurologic deficits and hearing loss in newborns. Development of a maternal HCMV vaccine to prevent vertical virus transmission is a high priority, yet protective maternal immune responses following acute infection are poorly understood. To characterize the maternal humoral immune response to primary CMV infection, we investigated the plasmablast and early antibody repertoire using a nonhuman primate model with two acutely rhesus CMV (RhCMV) infected animals - a CD4+ T cell-depleted dam that experienced fetal loss shortly after vertical RhCMV transmission and an immunocompetent dam that did not transmit RhCMV to her infant...
March 15, 2017: Clinical and Vaccine Immunology: CVI
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