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Gut immune brain

Katherine R Amato
Research examining the gut microbiota is currently exploding, and results are providing new perspectives on human biology. Factors such as host diet and physiology influence the composition and function of the gut microbiota, which in turn affects human nutrition, health, and behavior via interactions with metabolism, the immune system, and the brain. These findings represent an exciting new twist on familiar topics, and as a result, gut microbiome research is likely to provide insight into unresolved biological mechanisms driving human health...
October 20, 2016: American Journal of Human Biology: the Official Journal of the Human Biology Council
Dervla O'Malley
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common disorder characterized by recurrent abdominal pain, bloating and disturbed bowel habit, symptoms which impact on the quality of life of sufferers. The pathophysiological changes underlying this multifactorial condition are complex and include increased sensitivity to luminal and mucosal factors which result in altered colonic transit and visceral pain. Moreover, dysfunctional communication in the bidirectional signaling axis between the brain and the gut, which involves efferent and afferent branches of the peripheral nervous systems, circulating endocrine hormones and local paracrine and neurocrine factors, including immune and perhaps even microbial signaling molecules have a role to play in this disorder...
October 13, 2016: American Journal of Physiology. Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology
Bjoern O Schroeder, Fredrik Bäckhed
The ecosystem of the human gut consists of trillions of bacteria forming a bioreactor that is fueled by dietary macronutrients to produce bioactive compounds. These microbiota-derived metabolites signal to distant organs in the body, which enables the gut bacteria to connect to the immune and hormone system, to the brain (the gut-brain axis) and to host metabolism, as well as other functions of the host. This microbe-host communication is essential to maintain vital functions of the healthy host. Recently, however, the gut microbiota has been associated with a number of diseases, ranging from obesity and inflammatory diseases to behavioral and physiological abnormalities associated with neurodevelopmental disorders...
October 6, 2016: Nature Medicine
Lye Huey Shi, Kunasundari Balakrishnan, Kokila Thiagarajah, Nor Ismaliza Mohd Ismail, Ooi Shao Yin
Probiotics are live microorganisms that can be found in fermented foods and cultured milk, and are widely used for the preparation of infant food. They are well-known as "health friendly bacteria", which exhibit various health beneficial properties such as prevention of bowel diseases, improving the immune system, for lactose intolerance and intestinal microbial balance, exhibiting antihypercholesterolemic and antihypertensive effects, alleviation of postmenopausal disorders, and reducing traveller's diarrhoea...
August 2016: Tropical Life Sciences Research
Charlotte D'Mello, Mark G Swain
A growing body of evidence now highlights a key role for inflammation in mediating sickness behaviors and depression. Systemic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and chronic liver disease have high comorbidity with depression. How the periphery communicates with the brain to mediate changes in neurotransmission and thereby behavior is not completely understood. Traditional routes of communication between the periphery and the brain involve neural and humoral pathways with TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-6 being the three main cytokines that have primarily been implicated in mediating signaling via these pathways...
September 28, 2016: Current Topics in Behavioral Neurosciences
Hong-Xing Wang, Yu-Ping Wang
OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the updated information about the gut microbiota-brain axis. DATA SOURCES: All articles about gut microbiota-brain axis published up to July 18, 2016, were identified through a literature search on PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science, with the keywords of "gut microbiota", "gut-brain axis", and "neuroscience". STUDY SELECTION: All relevant articles on gut microbiota and gut-brain axis were included and carefully reviewed, with no limitation of study design...
2016: Chinese Medical Journal
Jae Ho Park, Jong Wook Kim, Jong Kyu Park, Cheol Min Shin, Kee Wook Jung
Functional dyspepsia (FD) has a diverse pathophysiology and treatment is difficult. Translational research to understand its pathophysiology is underway. Hormonal factors, including ghrelin, seem promising, offering an understanding of appetite and eating. Functional MRI brain study can expand our knowledge of the brain-gut axis. Finally, immune systems research, including mast cells, can help with comprehensive understanding of FD. The clinical approaches based on these translational research projects are necessary to improve understanding of FD, leading to more effective treatment...
September 25, 2016: Korean Journal of Gastroenterology, Taehan Sohwagi Hakhoe Chi
Timothy G Dinan, John F Cryan
There is a growing realisation that the gut-brain axis and its regulation by the microbiota may play a key role in the biological and physiological basis of neurodevelopmental, age-related and neurodegenerative disorders. The routes of communication between the microbiota and brain are being unravelled and include the vagus nerve, gut hormone signalling, the immune system, tryptophan metabolism or by way of microbial metabolites such as short chain fatty acids. The importance of early life gut microbiota in shaping future health outcomes is also emerging...
September 19, 2016: Journal of Physiology
E G Severance, D Tveiten, L H Lindström, R H Yolken, K L Reichelt
BACKGROUND: Autoimmune phenotypes are prevalent in major psychiatric disorders. Disequilibria of cellular processes occurring in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract likely contribute to immune dysfunction in psychiatric disorders. As the venue of a complex community of resident microbes, the gut in a homeostatic state equates with a functional digestive system, cellular barrier stability and properly regulated recognition of self and non-self antigens. When gut processes become disrupted as a result of environmental or genetic factors, autoimmunity may ensue...
September 14, 2016: Current Pharmaceutical Design
Javier R Caso, Vicent Balanzá-Martínez, Tomás Palomo, Borja García-Bueno
BACKGROUND: The underlying pathophysiology of schizophrenia still remains elusive. Thus, there is a pressing need to identify novel targets for the development of new interventions and elucidate related biomarkers for the identification and monitoring of potentially responsive patients. In this sense, several hypotheses involving immune/inflammatory changes and the consequent oxidative/nitrosative stress, as well as a dysregulation in the immuno-inflammatory response have come into sight...
September 6, 2016: Current Pharmaceutical Design
Cristiano A Köhler, Michael Maes, Anastasiya Slyepchenko, Michael Berk, Marco Solmi, Krista L Lanctôt, André F Carvalho
Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, is a progressive disorder manifested by gradual memory loss and subsequent impairment in mental and behavioral functions. Though the primary risk factor for AD is advancing age, other factors such as diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, obesity, vascular factors and depression play a role in its pathogenesis. The human gastrointestinal tract has a diverse commensal microbial population, which has bidirectional interactions with the human host that are symbiotic in health, and in addition to nutrition, digestion, plays major roles in inflammation and immunity...
September 6, 2016: Current Pharmaceutical Design
Maria Elizabeth de Sousa Rodrigues, Mandakh Bekhbat, Madelyn C Houser, Jianjun Chang, Douglas I Walker, Dean P Jones, Claudia M P Oller do Nascimento, Christopher J Barnum, Malú G Tansey
The mechanisms underlying the association between chronic psychological stress, development of metabolic syndrome (MetS), and behavioral impairment in obesity are poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of mild chronic psychological stress on metabolic, inflammatory, and behavioral profiles in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. We hypothesized that (1) high-fat high-fructose diet (HFHF) and psychological stress would synergize to mediate the impact of inflammation on the central nervous system in the presence of behavioral dysfunction, and that (2) HFHF and stress interactions would impact insulin and lipid metabolism...
September 1, 2016: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
Rahul Mittal, Luca H Debs, Amit P Patel, Desiree Nguyen, Kunal Patel, Gregory O'Connor, M'hamed Grati, Jeenu Mittal, Denise Yan, Adrien A Eshraghi, Sapna K Deo, Sylvia Daunert, Xue Zhong Liu
Neurotransmitters including catecholamines and serotonin play a crucial role in maintaining homeostasis in the human body. Studies on these neurotransmitters mainly revolved around their role in the "fight or flight" response, transmitting signals across a chemical synapse and modulating blood flow throughout the body. However, recent research has demonstrated that neurotransmitters can play a significant role in the gastrointestinal (GI) physiology. Norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (E), dopamine (DA), and serotonin have recently been a topic of interest because of their roles in the gut physiology and their potential roles in gastrointestinal and central nervous system pathophysiology...
August 11, 2016: Journal of Cellular Physiology
A Micera, B O Balzamino, F Biamonte, G Esposito, R Marino, F Fanelli, F Keller
Reelin is a matrix glycoprotein that plays a pivotal role for the positioning of neurons throughout brain development. In the early developing cortex Reelin regulates radial migration of cortical neurons while later in development, Reelin promotes maturation of dendrites and dendritic spines. Low Reelin levels characterize healthy adult brain while increased Reelin levels have been associated with cellular events underlying response to injury. Reelin has been detected in structural and immune cells outside brain (liver, gut/colon tracts, kidney, testis, ovary, lung, retina and cornea)...
August 5, 2016: Current Molecular Medicine
Sandra Guidi, Patrizia Bianchi, Fiorenza Stagni, Andrea Giacomini, Marco Emili, Stefania Trazzi, Elisabetta Ciani, Renata Bartesaghi
In this review we look at this biological overlaps of neurodegenerative and psychiatric conditions, as exemplified by major depressive disorder (MDD). Recent work has highlighted how immune-inflammatory processes and their interactions with oxidative and nitrosative stress (O&NS), couple to drive changes in neuroregulatory tryptophan catabolite (TRYCAT), with consequences for serotonin availability for the melatonergic pathways. Such work significantly questions the validity and utility of non-biologically based current classification systems for psychiatric and neurodegenerative conditions...
August 1, 2016: CNS & Neurological Disorders Drug Targets
Ayako Aoki-Yoshida, Reiji Aoki, Naoko Moriya, Tatsuhiko Goto, Yoshifumi Kubota, Atsushi Toyoda, Yoshiharu Takayama, Chise Suzuki
The microbiota-gut-brain axis plays an important role in the development of stress-induced mental disorders. We previously established the subchronic and mild social defeat stress (sCSDS) model, a murine experimental model of depression, and investigated the metabolomic profiles of plasma and liver. Here we used omics approaches to identify stress-induced changes in the gastrointestinal tract. Mice exposed to sCSDS for 10 days showed the following changes: (1) elevation of cholic acid and reduction of 5-aminovaleric acid among cecal metabolites; (2) downregulation of genes involved in the immune response in the terminal ileum; (3) a shift in the diversity of the microbiota in cecal contents and feces; and (4) fluctuations in the concentrations of cecal metabolites produced by gut microbiota reflected in plasma and hepatic metabolites...
September 2, 2016: Journal of Proteome Research
Myles R Minter, Can Zhang, Vanessa Leone, Daina L Ringus, Xiaoqiong Zhang, Paul Oyler-Castrillo, Mark W Musch, Fan Liao, Joseph F Ward, David M Holtzman, Eugene B Chang, Rudolph E Tanzi, Sangram S Sisodia
Severe amyloidosis and plaque-localized neuro-inflammation are key pathological features of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In addition to astrocyte and microglial reactivity, emerging evidence suggests a role of gut microbiota in regulating innate immunity and influencing brain function. Here, we examine the role of the host microbiome in regulating amyloidosis in the APPSWE/PS1ΔE9 mouse model of AD. We show that prolonged shifts in gut microbial composition and diversity induced by long-term broad-spectrum combinatorial antibiotic treatment regime decreases Aβ plaque deposition...
2016: Scientific Reports
Eoin Sherwin, Kiran V Sandhu, Timothy G Dinan, John F Cryan
The role of the gut microbiota in health and disease is becoming increasingly recognized. The microbiota-gut-brain axis is a bi-directional pathway between the brain and the gastrointestinal system. The bacterial commensals in our gut can signal to the brain through a variety of mechanisms, which are slowly being resolved. These include the vagus nerve, immune mediators and microbial metabolites, which influence central processes such as neurotransmission and behaviour. Dysregulation in the composition of the gut microbiota has been identified in several neuropsychiatric disorders, such as autism, schizophrenia and depression...
July 14, 2016: CNS Drugs
Vikramjeet Singh, Stefan Roth, Gemma Llovera, Rebecca Sadler, Debora Garzetti, Bärbel Stecher, Martin Dichgans, Arthur Liesz
UNLABELLED: Acute brain ischemia induces a local neuroinflammatory reaction and alters peripheral immune homeostasis at the same time. Recent evidence has suggested a key role of the gut microbiota in autoimmune diseases by modulating immune homeostasis. Therefore, we investigated the mechanistic link among acute brain ischemia, microbiota alterations, and the immune response after brain injury. Using two distinct models of acute middle cerebral artery occlusion, we show by next-generation sequencing that large stroke lesions cause gut microbiota dysbiosis, which in turn affects stroke outcome via immune-mediated mechanisms...
July 13, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
Kwang-Chul Kwon, Henry Daniell
Plants cells are now approved by the FDA for cost-effective production of protein drugs (PDs) in large-scale current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) hydroponic growth facilities. In lyophilized plant cells, PDs are stable at ambient temperature for several years, maintaining their folding and efficacy. Upon oral delivery, PDs bioencapsulated in plant cells are protected in the stomach from acids and enzymes but are subsequently released into the gut lumen by microbes that digest the plant cell wall. The large mucosal area of the human intestine offers an ideal system for oral drug delivery...
August 2016: Molecular Therapy: the Journal of the American Society of Gene Therapy
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