keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Gut immune brain

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28526435/the-bidirectional-gut-brain-microbiota-axis-as-a-potential-nexus-between-traumatic-brain-injury-inflammation-and-disease
#1
Mark H Sundman, Nan-Kuei Chen, Vignesh Subbian, Ying-Hui Chou
As head injuries and their sequelae have become an increasingly salient matter of public health, experts in the field have made great progress elucidating the biological processes occurring within the brain at the moment of injury and throughout the recovery thereafter. Given the extraordinary rate at which our collective knowledge of neurotrauma has grown, new insights may be revealed by examining the existing literature across disciplines with a new perspective. This article will aim to expand the scope of this rapidly evolving field of research beyond the confines of the central nervous system (CNS)...
May 16, 2017: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28512033/bifidobacterium-cect-7765-modulates-early-stress-induced-immune-neuroendocrine-and-behavioral-alterations-in-mice
#2
A Moya-Pérez, A Perez-Villalba, A Benítez-Páez, I Campillo, Y Sanz
Emerging evidence suggests that there is a window of opportunity within the early developmental period, when microbiota-based interventions could play a major role in modulating the gut-brain axis and, thereby, in preventing mood disorders. This study aims at evaluating the effects and mode of action of Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum CECT 7765 in a murine model of chronic stress induced by maternal separation (MS). C57Bl/6J male breast-fed pups were divided into four groups, which were subjected or not to MS and supplemented with placebo or B...
May 13, 2017: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28506921/decrease-of-blood-anti-%C3%AE-1-3-galactose-abs-levels-in-multiple-sclerosis-ms-and-clinically-isolated-syndrome-cis-patients
#3
L Le Berre, J Rousse, P-A Gourraud, B-M Imbert-Marcille, A Salama, G Evanno, G Semana, A Nicot, E Dugast, P Guérif, C Adjaoud, T Freour, S Brouard, F Agbalika, R Marignier, D Brassat, D-A Laplaud, E Drouet, V Van Pesch, J-P Soulillou
The etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) remains elusive. Among the possible causes, the increase of anti-Neu5Gc antibodies during EBV primo-infection of Infectious mononucleosis (IMN) may damage the integrity of the blood-brain barrier facilitating the transfer of EBV-infected B cells and anti-EBV T cell clones in the brain. We investigated the change in titers of anti-Neu5Gc and anti-α1,3 Galactose antibodies in 49 IMN, in 76 MS, and 73 clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) patients, as well as age/gender-matched healthy individuals...
May 18, 2017: Clinical Immunology: the Official Journal of the Clinical Immunology Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28503116/melatonin-pharmacology-functions-and-therapeutic-benefits
#4
REVIEW
Sylvie Tordjman, Sylvie Chokron, Richard Delorme, Annaëlle Charrier, Eric Bellissant, Nemat Jaafari, Claire Fougerou
BACKGROUND: Melatonin synchronizes central but also peripheral oscillators (fetal adrenal gland, pancreas, liver, kidney, heart, lung, fat, gut, etc.), allowing temporal organization of biological functions through circadian rhythms (24-hour cycles) in relation to periodic environmental changes and therefore adaptation of the individual to his/her internal and external environment. Measures of melatonin are considered the best peripheral indices of human circadian timing based on an internal 24-hour clock...
April 2017: Current Neuropharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28503081/feeding-intolerance-inflammation-and-neurobehaviors-in-preterm-infants
#5
Tiffany A Moore, Rita H Pickler
PURPOSE: Identifying relationships between feeding intolerance (FI), inflammation, and early measures of neurodevelopment may provide the basis for clinically relevant assessments for NICU clinicians and staff. The purpose of this secondary analysis was to examine the relationship of FI to inflammatory markers and/or neurobehaviors in the first week of life. METHODS: This was a retrospective, matched case-control design with data drawn from 114 infants born at ≤32 weeks gestation...
June 2017: Journal of Neonatal Nursing: JNN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28489816/endothelial-tlr4-and-the-microbiome-drive-cerebral-cavernous-malformations
#6
Alan T Tang, Jaesung P Choi, Jonathan J Kotzin, Yiqing Yang, Courtney C Hong, Nicholas Hobson, Romuald Girard, Hussein A Zeineddine, Rhonda Lightle, Thomas Moore, Ying Cao, Robert Shenkar, Mei Chen, Patricia Mericko, Jisheng Yang, Li Li, Ceylan Tanes, Dmytro Kobuley, Urmo Võsa, Kevin J Whitehead, Dean Y Li, Lude Franke, Blaine Hart, Markus Schwaninger, Jorge Henao-Mejia, Leslie Morrison, Helen Kim, Issam A Awad, Xiangjian Zheng, Mark L Kahn
Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are a cause of stroke and seizure for which no effective medical therapies yet exist. CCMs arise from the loss of an adaptor complex that negatively regulates MEKK3-KLF2/4 signalling in brain endothelial cells, but upstream activators of this disease pathway have yet to be identified. Here we identify endothelial Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and the gut microbiome as critical stimulants of CCM formation. Activation of TLR4 by Gram-negative bacteria or lipopolysaccharide accelerates CCM formation, and genetic or pharmacologic blockade of TLR4 signalling prevents CCM formation in mice...
May 10, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28450850/cholecystokinin-from-local-gut-hormone-to-ubiquitous-messenger
#7
REVIEW
Jens F Rehfeld
Cholecystokinin (CCK) was discovered in 1928 in jejunal extracts as a gallbladder contraction factor. It was later shown to be member of a peptide family, which are all ligands for the CCK1 and CCK2 receptors. CCK peptides are known to be synthetized in small intestinal endocrine I-cells and cerebral neurons. But in addition, CCK is expressed in several endocrine glands (pituitary cells, thyroid C-cells, pancreatic islets, the adrenals, and the testes); in peripheral nerves; in cortical and medullary kidney cells; in cardial myocytes; and in cells of the immune system...
2017: Frontiers in Endocrinology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28446880/shifts-in-the-gut-microbiota-composition-due-to-depleted-bone-marrow-beta-adrenergic-signaling-are-associated-with-suppressed-inflammatory-transcriptional-networks-in-the-mouse-colon
#8
Tao Yang, Niousha Ahmari, Jordan T Schmidt, Ty Redler, Rebeca Arocha, Kevin Pacholec, Kacy L Magee, Wendi Malphurs, Jennifer L Owen, Gregory A Krane, Eric Li, Gary P Wang, Thomas W Vickroy, Mohan K Raizada, Christopher J Martyniuk, Jasenka Zubcevic
The brain-gut axis plays a critical role in the regulation of different diseases, many of which are characterized by sympathetic dysregulation. However, a direct link between sympathetic dysregulation and gut dysbiosis remains to be illustrated. Bone marrow (BM)-derived immune cells continuously interact with the gut microbiota to maintain homeostasis in the host. Their function is largely dependent upon the sympathetic nervous system acting via adrenergic receptors present on the BM immune cells. In this study, we utilized a novel chimera mouse that lacks the expression of BM beta1/2 adrenergic receptors (b1/2-ARs) to investigate the role of the sympathetic drive to the BM in gut and microbiota homeostasis...
2017: Frontiers in Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28438331/-the-intestinal-microbiota-a-new-player-in-depression
#9
M Meyrel, L Varin, B Detaint, F Mouaffak
Depression is the leading cause of disability in the world according to the World Health Organization. The effectiveness of the available antidepressant therapies is limited. Data from the literature suggest that some subtypes of depression may be associated with chronic low grade inflammation. The uncovering of the role of intestinal microbiota in the development of the immune system and its bidirectional communication with the brain have led to growing interest on reciprocal interactions between inflammation, microbiota and depression...
April 21, 2017: L'Encéphale
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28433458/linking-the-biological-underpinnings-of-depression-role-of-mitochondria-interactions-with-melatonin-inflammation-sirtuins-tryptophan-catabolites-dna-repair-and-oxidative-and-nitrosative-stress-with-consequences-for-classification-and-cognition
#10
REVIEW
George Anderson
The pathophysiological underpinnings of neuroprogressive processes in recurrent major depressive disorder (rMDD) are reviewed. A wide array of biochemical processes underlie MDD presentations and their shift to a recurrent, neuroprogressive course, including: increased immune-inflammation, tryptophan catabolites (TRYCATs), mitochondrial dysfunction, aryl hydrocarbonn receptor activation, and oxidative and nitrosative stress (O&NS), as well as decreased sirtuins and melatonergic pathway activity. These biochemical changes may have their roots in central, systemic and/or peripheral sites, including in the gut, as well as in developmental processes, such as prenatal stressors and breastfeeding consequences...
April 19, 2017: Progress in Neuro-psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28417216/pathogenic-mechanisms-following-ischemic-stroke
#11
REVIEW
Seyed Esmaeil Khoshnam, William Winlow, Maryam Farzaneh, Yaghoob Farbood, Hadi Fathi Moghaddam
Stroke is the second most common cause of death and the leading cause of disability worldwide. Brain injury following stroke results from a complex series of pathophysiological events including excitotoxicity, oxidative and nitrative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis. Moreover, there is a mechanistic link between brain ischemia, innate and adaptive immune cells, intracranial atherosclerosis, and also the gut microbiota in modifying the cerebral responses to ischemic insult. There are very few treatments for stroke injuries, partly owing to an incomplete understanding of the diverse cellular and molecular changes that occur following ischemic stroke and that are responsible for neuronal death...
April 17, 2017: Neurological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28404070/pathophysiology-of-irritable-bowel-syndrome
#12
REVIEW
Gerald J Holtmann, Alexander C Ford, Nicholas J Talley
Traditionally, irritable bowel syndrome has been considered to be a disorder with no known underlying structural or biochemical explanation, but this concept is likely to be outdated. In this Review we challenge the widely accepted view that irritable bowel syndrome is an unexplained brain-gut disorder. There is epidemiological evidence that, in a major subset of patients, gastrointestinal symptoms arise first and only later do incident mood disorders occur. Additionally, possible mechanisms for gut-brain dysfunction have been identified, suggesting primary gut disturbances might be the underlying cause in a subgroup...
October 2016: Lancet. Gastroenterology & Hepatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28400259/a-role-for-the-peripheral-immune-system-in-the-development-of-alcohol-use-disorders
#13
REVIEW
Philippe de Timary, Peter Stärkel, Nathalie M Delzenne, Sophie Leclercq
Preclinical studies have largely supported that alcohol-consumption induces the development of an important neuro-inflammation and this neuro-inflammation contributes to alcohol-drinking behaviors, notably through TLR4 and LPS related mechanisms. The neuro-inflammation originates from a direct interaction of ethanol with the neuronal and immune brain cells, but also from the generation of an inflammation at the periphery. Ethanol in particular interacts with the intestine to develop a gut dysbiosis and an increase in gut permeability, that allows the liberation of bacterial fragments to the systemic circulation and induces a pro-inflammatory response in the systemic circulation and peripheral organs, and in particular the liver...
April 8, 2017: Neuropharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28396623/modified-mediterranean-diet-for-enrichment-of-short-chain-fatty-acids-potential-adjunctive-therapeutic-to-target-immune-and-metabolic-dysfunction-in-schizophrenia
#14
Jamie Joseph, Colin Depp, Pei-An B Shih, Kristen S Cadenhead, Geert Schmid-Schönbein
Growing interest in gut and digestive processes and their potential link to brain and peripheral based inflammation or biobehavioral phenotypes has led to an increasing number of basic and translational scientific reports focused on the role of gut microbiota within the context of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, the effect of dietary modification on specific gut metabolites, in association with immune, metabolic, and psychopathological functioning in schizophrenia spectrum disorders has not been well characterized...
2017: Frontiers in Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28379454/intervention-strategies-for-cesarean-section-induced-alterations-in-the-microbiota-gut-brain-axis
#15
Angela Moya-Pérez, Pauline Luczynski, Ingrid B Renes, Shugui Wang, Yuliya Borre, C Anthony Ryan, Jan Knol, Catherine Stanton, Timothy G Dinan, John F Cryan
Microbial colonization of the gastrointestinal tract is an essential process that modulates host physiology and immunity. Recently, researchers have begun to understand how and when these microorganisms colonize the gut and the early-life factors that impact their natural ecological establishment. The vertical transmission of maternal microbes to the offspring is a critical factor for host immune and metabolic development. Increasing evidence also points to a role in the wiring of the gut-brain axis. This process may be altered by various factors such as mode of delivery, gestational age at birth, the use of antibiotics in early life, infant feeding, and hygiene practices...
April 1, 2017: Nutrition Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28375200/low-dose-penicillin-in-early-life-induces-long-term-changes-in-murine-gut-microbiota-brain-cytokines-and-behavior
#16
Sophie Leclercq, Firoz M Mian, Andrew M Stanisz, Laure B Bindels, Emmanuel Cambier, Hila Ben-Amram, Omry Koren, Paul Forsythe, John Bienenstock
There is increasing concern about potential long-term effects of antibiotics on children's health. Epidemiological studies have revealed that early-life antibiotic exposure can increase the risk of developing immune and metabolic diseases, and rodent studies have shown that administration of high doses of antibiotics has long-term effects on brain neurochemistry and behaviour. Here we investigate whether low-dose penicillin in late pregnancy and early postnatal life induces long-term effects in the offspring of mice...
April 4, 2017: Nature Communications
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28372330/the-gut-microbiota-and-alzheimer-s-disease
#17
Chunmei Jiang, Guangning Li, Pengru Huang, Zhou Liu, Bin Zhao
The gut microbiota comprises a complex community of microorganism species that resides in our gastrointestinal ecosystem and whose alterations influence not only various gut disorders but also central nervous system disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD, the most common form of dementia, is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with impaired cognition and cerebral accumulation of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ). Most notably, the microbiota-gut-brain axis is a bidirectional communication system that is not fully understood, but includes neural, immune, endocrine, and metabolic pathways...
2017: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28356427/microbiota-gut-brain-axis-modulator-of-host-metabolism-and-appetite
#18
REVIEW
Marcel van de Wouw, Harriët Schellekens, Timothy G Dinan, John F Cryan
The gut harbors an enormous diversity of microbes that are essential for the maintenance of homeostasis in health and disease. A growing body of evidence supports the role of this microbiota in influencing host appetite and food intake. Individual species within the gut microbiota are under selective pressure arising from nutrients available and other bacterial species present. Each bacterial species within the gut aims to increase its own fitness, habitat, and survival via specific fermentation of dietary nutrients and secretion of metabolites, many of which can influence host appetite and eating behavior by directly affecting nutrient sensing and appetite and satiety-regulating systems...
March 29, 2017: Journal of Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28351411/activation-of-fxr-pathway-does-not-alter-glial-cell-function
#19
Stefanie Albrecht, Ann-Katrin Fleck, Ina Kirchberg, Stephanie Hucke, Marie Liebmann, Luisa Klotz, Tanja Kuhlmann
BACKGROUND: The nuclear receptor farnesoid-X-receptor (FXR; NR1H4) is expressed not only in the liver, gut, kidney and adipose tissue but also in the immune cells. FXR has been shown to confer protection in several animal models of inflammation, including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). FXR agonists are currently tested in clinical trials for treatment of human metabolic diseases. The beneficial effect of FXR agonists in EAE suggests that FXR might represent a potential target in inflammatory-demyelinating CNS diseases, such as MS...
March 28, 2017: Journal of Neuroinflammation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28347867/microbiota-differences-between-commercial-breeders-impacts-the-post-stroke-immune-response
#20
Rebecca Sadler, Vikramjeet Singh, Corinne Benakis, Debora Garzetti, David Brea, Bärbel Stecher, Josef Anrather, Arthur Liesz
Experimental reproducibility between laboratories is a major translational obstacle worldwide, particularly in studies investigating immunomodulatory therapies in relation to brain disease. In recent years increasing attention has been drawn towards the gut microbiota as a key factor in immune cell polarization. Moreover, manipulation of the gut microbiota has been found effective in a diverse range of brain disorders. Within this study we aimed to test the impact of microbiota differences between mice from different sources on the post-stroke neuroinflammatory response...
March 24, 2017: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
keyword
keyword
120979
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"