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Loss of tolerance

Shaw D Bamber, Stig Westerlund
Sub-sea geological storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) provides a viable option for the Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) approach for reducing atmospheric emissions of this greenhouse gas. Although generally considered to offer a low risk of major leakage, it remains relevant to establish the possible consequences for marine organisms that live in or on sediments overlying these storage areas if such an event may occur. The present study has used a series of laboratory exposures and behavioral bioassays to establish the sensitivity of Arctica islandica to simulated leakages of CO2...
October 11, 2016: Aquatic Toxicology
Ursula N Broder, Tina Jaeger, Urs Jenal
Virulence of pathogenic bacteria is a tightly controlled process to facilitate invasion and survival in host tissues. Although pathways controlling virulence have been defined in detail, signals modulating these processes are poorly understood. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes acute and chronic infections in humans. Disease progression is typically associated with a loss of acute virulence and the emergence of biofilms and chronic behaviour. The acute-to-chronic switch is governed by the global Gac/Rsm pathway...
October 24, 2016: Nature Microbiology
C J Lee, T T Brown, L J Cheskin, P Choi, T H Moran, L Peterson, R Matuk, K E Steele
BACKGROUND: Meal tolerance tests are frequently used to study dynamic incretin and insulin responses in the postprandial state; however, the optimal meal that is best tolerated and suited for hormonal response following surgical and medical weight loss has yet to be determined. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the tolerability and effectiveness of different test meals in inducing detectable changes in markers of glucose metabolism in individuals who have undergone a weight loss intervention...
December 2015: Obesity Science & Practice
Petra Bacher, Frederik Heinrich, Ulrik Stervbo, Mikalai Nienen, Marco Vahldieck, Christina Iwert, Katrin Vogt, Jutta Kollet, Nina Babel, Birgit Sawitzki, Carsten Schwarz, Stefan Bereswill, Markus M Heimesaat, Guido Heine, Gabriele Gadermaier, Claudia Asam, Mario Assenmacher, Olaf Kniemeyer, Axel A Brakhage, Fátima Ferreira, Michael Wallner, Margitta Worm, Alexander Scheffold
FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) maintain tolerance against self-antigens and innocuous environmental antigens. However, it is still unknown whether Treg-mediated tolerance is antigen specific and how Treg specificity contributes to the selective loss of tolerance, as observed in human immunopathologies such as allergies. Here, we used antigen-reactive T cell enrichment to identify antigen-specific human Tregs. We demonstrate dominant Treg-mediated tolerance against particulate aeroallergens, such as pollen, house dust mites, and fungal spores...
October 18, 2016: Cell
Hye-Yeon Seok, Dong-Hyuk Woo, Linh Vu Nguyen, Huong T Tran, Vaishali N Tarte, Syed Muhammad Muntazir Mehdi, Sun-Young Lee, Yong-Hwan Moon
AtNAP , an Arabidopsis NAC transcription factor family gene, functions as a negative regulator via transcriptional repression of AREB1 in salt stress response. AtNAP is an NAC family transcription factor in Arabidopsis and is known to be a positive regulator of senescence. However, its exact function and underlying molecular mechanism in stress responses are not well known. Here, we investigated functional roles of AtNAP in salt stress response. AtNAP expression significantly increased at the seedling stage, with higher expression in both shoots and roots under NaCl, mannitol, and ABA treatments...
October 21, 2016: Planta
Adey A Berhanu, Svetlana Krasnokutsky, Robert T Keenan, Michael H Pillinger
INTRODUCTION: Pegloticase is a highly effective therapy for patients with refractory and/or tophaceous gout, but has a high discontinuation rate (30-50%) due to development of anti-drug antibodies causing loss of efficacy and risk of infusion reactions. OBJECTIVE: To describe the use of azathioprine or other immunosuppressive therapies as a pegloticase adjunct to prevent pegloticase immunogenicity when treating gout. METHODS: Case report of azathioprine use in a patient receiving pegloticase therapy for refractory tophaceous gout, and review of the literature for the impact of immunosuppressive agents on development of anti-drug antibodies...
September 20, 2016: Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism
Paul A Gurbel, Kevin P Bliden, Rahul Chaudhary, Jeff Patrick, Fang Liu, Gailing Chen, Christopher McLeod, Udaya S Tantry
High platelet reactivity and high platelet turnover have been implicated in incomplete platelet inhibition during immediate-release acetylsalicylic acid therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). An extended-release acetylsalicylic acid (ER-ASA; Durlaza) formulation was developed to provide 24-hour antithrombotic effects with once-daily dosing. The objective of the study was to evaluate the antiplatelet effects of ER-ASA in patients with DM. In this open-label, single-center study, patients with DM (n = 40) and multiple cardiovascular risk factors received ER-ASA 162...
September 20, 2016: American Journal of Cardiology
Monique Vanaman Wilson, Sabrina Guillen Fabi, Ryan Greene
Importance: The pivotal approval trial for a smooth, highly cohesive, viscous, 20-mg/mL hyaluronic acid filler demonstrated sustained aesthetic improvement, with a mean injection volume of 6.65 mL. In daily practice, however, it is not often practical or necessary to use large injection volumes to achieve the desired cosmetic outcome. Objective: To assess the efficacy, longevity, and patient satisfaction associated with correction of age-related midface volume loss using the low volumes of hyaluronic acid filler more commonly used in day-to-day practice...
October 20, 2016: JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery
Mark Shepherd, Maud E S Achard, Adi Idris, Makrina Totsika, Minh-Duy Phan, Kate M Peters, Sohinee Sarkar, Cláudia A Ribeiro, Louise V Holyoake, Dimitrios Ladakis, Glen C Ulett, Matthew J Sweet, Robert K Poole, Alastair G McEwan, Mark A Schembri
Nitric oxide (NO) is a toxic free radical produced by neutrophils and macrophages in response to infection. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) induces a variety of defence mechanisms in response to NO, including direct NO detoxification (Hmp, NorVW, NrfA), iron-sulphur cluster repair (YtfE), and the expression of the NO-tolerant cytochrome bd-I respiratory oxidase (CydAB). The current study quantifies the relative contribution of these systems to UPEC growth and survival during infection. Loss of the flavohemoglobin Hmp and cytochrome bd-I elicit the greatest sensitivity to NO-mediated growth inhibition, whereas all but the periplasmic nitrite reductase NrfA provide protection against neutrophil killing and promote survival within activated macrophages...
October 21, 2016: Scientific Reports
Ann M Buysse, Maurice C H Yap, Ricky Hunter, Jonathan Babcock, Xinpei Huang, Marshall H Parker
BACKGROUND: Optimization studies on compounds initially designed to be herbicides led to the discovery of a series of [6-(3-pyridyl)pyridazin-3-yl]amides exhibiting aphicidal properties. Systematic modifications of the amide moiety as well as the pyridine and pyridazine rings were carried out to determine if these changes could improve insecticidal potency. RESULTS: Structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies showed that changes to the pyridine and pyridazine rings generally resulted in a significant loss of insecticidal potency against green peach aphids (Myzus persicae (Sulzer) and cotton aphids (Aphis gossypii (Glover)...
October 21, 2016: Pest Management Science
L M Mena Bares, E Carmona Asenjo, M V García Sánchez, E Moreno Ortega, F R Maza Muret, M V Guiote Moreno, A M Santos Bueno, E Iglesias Flores, J M Benítez Cantero, J A Vallejo Casas
Chronic diarrhoea is a common entity in daily clinical practice and it leads to a loss in these patients quality of life. It may be the main symptom of multiple ethiologies including bile acid malabsorption (BAM) which has a comparable prevalence to celiac disease. The BAM results from imbalances in the homeostasis of bile acids in the enterohepatic circulation. It can be a consequence of ileal disease or ileal dysfunction (BAM type i), it can be considered idiopathic or primary (BAM type ii) or associated with other gastrointestinal entities (BAM type iii)...
October 17, 2016: Revista Española de Medicina Nuclear e Imagen Molecular
Huong Nguyen, Jerome Vanclay, John Herbohn, Jennifer Firn
There is growing interest in multi-species tropical plantations but little information exists to guide their design and silviculture. The Rainforestation Farming system is the oldest tropical polyculture planting system in the Philippines and provides a unique opportunity to understand the underlying processes affecting tree performance within diverse plantings. Data collected from 85 plots distributed across the 18 mixed-species plantations in the Philippines was used to identify the factors influencing growth, probability of harvest, and death of trees in these complex plantings...
2016: PloS One
Rüdiger Hardeland
Dynamic aspects of melatonin's actions merit increasing future attention. This concerns particularly entirely different effects in senescent, weakened oscillators and in dysregulated oscillators of cancer cells that may be epigenetically blocked. This is especially obvious in the case of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) which is upregulated by melatonin in aged tissues, but strongly downregulated in several cancer cells. These findings are not at all controversial, but are explained on the basis of divergent changes in weakened and dysregulated oscillators...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Pineal Research
Kohtaro Watanabe, Hirokazu Takahashi, Saori Sato, Shunsaku Nishiuchi, Fumie Omori, Al Imran Malik, Timothy David Colmer, Yoshiro Mano, Mikio Nakazono
A radial oxygen loss (ROL) barrier in roots of waterlogging-tolerant plants promotes oxygen movement via aerenchyma to the root tip, and impedes soil phytotoxin entry. The molecular mechanism and genetic regulation of ROL barrier formation are largely unknown. Zea nicaraguensis, a waterlogging-tolerant wild relative of maize (Z. mays ssp. mays), forms a tight ROL barrier in its roots when waterlogged. We used Z. nicaraguensis chromosome segment introgression lines (ILs) in maize (inbred line Mi29) to elucidate the chromosomal region involved in regulating root ROL barrier formation...
October 20, 2016: Plant, Cell & Environment
Jonathan W Moore, Julian D Olden
Integrating knowledge of environmental degradation, biodiversity change, and ecosystem processes across large spatial scales remains a key challenge to illuminating the resilience of Earth's systems. There is now a growing realization that the manner in which communities will respond to anthropogenic impacts will ultimately control the ecosystem consequences. Here we examine the response of freshwater fishes and their nutrient excretion - a key ecosystem process that can control aquatic productivity - to human land development across the contiguous United States...
October 20, 2016: Global Change Biology
Kingsley O Abode-Iyamah, Stephanus V Viljoen, Colleen L McHenry, Michael A Petrie, Kirsten E Stoner, Nader S Dahdaleh, Nicole M Grosland, Matthew A Howard, Richard K Shields
BACKGROUND: Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is a common disease of aging that leads to gait instability resulting from loss of leg sensory and motor functions. The results of surgical intervention have been studied using a variety of methods, but no test has been reported that objectively measures integrative leg motor sensory functions in CSM patients. OBJECTIVE: To determine the feasibility of using a novel single leg squat (SLS) test to measure integrative motor sensory functions in patients with CSM before and after surgery...
November 2016: Neurosurgery
Sarah A Overall, Dorothée Bourges, Ian R van Driel, Paul A Gleeson
How the immune system maintains peripheral tolerance under inflammatory conditions is poorly understood. Here we assessed the fate of gastritogenic T cells following inflammatory activation in vivo. Self-reactive T cells (A23 T cells) specific for the gastric H(+) /K(+) ATPase α subunit (HKα) were transferred into immunosufficient recipient mice and immunised at a site distant to the stomach with adjuvant containing the cognate HKα peptide antigen. Activation of A23 T cells by immunisation did not impact on either immune tolerance or protection from gastric autoimmunity in wild-type BALB/c mice...
October 19, 2016: European Journal of Immunology
Gang Chen, Dongsheng Yu, Xue Nian, Junyi Liu, Ronald J Koenig, Bin Xu, Liang Sheng
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the most common form of chronic liver disease, manifests as an over-accumulation of hepatic fat. We have recently shown that mice with genetic knockout of a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA) (SRAKO) are resistant to high fat diet-induced obesity with a phenotype that includes improved glucose tolerance and attenuated hepatic steatosis. The underlying mechanism was investigated in the present study. We found that hepatic levels of SRA and adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), a major hepatic triacylglycerol (TAG) hydrolase, were inversely regulated by fasting in mice, and the expression of liver ATGL was induced by SRAKO under normal and high fat diet (HFD) feeding...
October 19, 2016: Scientific Reports
Deborah S Bower, David M Scheltinga, Simon Clulow, John Clulow, Craig E Franklin, Arthur Georges
Freshwater biota experience physiological challenges in regions affected by salinization, but often the effects on particular species are poorly understood. Freshwater turtles are of particular concern as they appear to have limited ability to cope with environmental conditions that are hyperosmotic to their body fluids. Here, we determined the physiological responses of two Australian freshwater chelid turtles, Emydura macquarii and Chelodina expansa, exposed to freshwater (0‰) and brackish water (15‰, representing a hyperosmotic environment)...
2016: Conservation Physiology
Andrea J Morash, Sara R C Mackellar, Louise Tunnah, David A Barnett, Kilian M Stehfest, Jayson M Semmens, Suzanne Currie
Estuarine habitats are frequently used as nurseries by elasmobranch species for their protection and abundant resources; however, global climate change is increasing the frequency and severity of environmental challenges in these estuaries that may negatively affect elasmobranch physiology. Hyposmotic events are particularly challenging for marine sharks that osmoconform, and species-specific tolerances are not well known. Therefore, we sought to determine the effects of an acute (48 h) ecologically relevant hyposmotic event (25...
2016: Conservation Physiology
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