keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

racism in america

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29114872/racism-in-trump-s-america-reflections-on-culture-sociology-and-the-2016-us-presidential-election
#1
Lawrence D Bobo
Despite much positive change in the post civil rights era, U.S. notions of racism and white supremacy remain powerful elements of American culture. The adaptability and enduring power of these forces can be seen in the emergence of a new historical epoch best describe as the era of Laissez Faire Racism. Prevalent attitudes among white Americans, certain theoretical arguments and hypotheses in American sociology, as well the election of Donald Trump rest upon the on-going operation of racism. In particular, I attribute Trump's electoral success to three critical dilemmas of race that defined contours of the 2016 presidential election: (1) worsening economic inequality in the presence of rapidly changing ethno-racial demography; (2) intensified political partisanship in the presence of well-institutionalized racially coded campaign strategies and rhetoric; and (3) the failure of the Clinton campaign to simultaneously champion the interests of working and middle class families and galvanize the previously powerful multiracial Obama coalition...
November 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28876308/the-need-to-promote-sexual-health-in-america-a-new-vision-for-public-health-action
#2
Jessie V Ford, Megan B Ivankovich, John M Douglas, Edward W Hook, Lynn Barclay, Joycelyn Elders, David Satcher, Eli Coleman
Sexual health is considered to be a state of wellness with physical, emotional, mental, and social dimensions. Sexual health can contribute to our overall well-being in each of these dimensions. However, despite the intrinsic importance and positive aspects of sexuality in our lives, the United States presently faces significant challenges related to the sexual health of its citizens, including human immunodeficiency virus, other sexually transmitted infections, viral hepatitis, unintended pregnancies, sexual violence, sexual dysfunction, and cancers in reproductive tracts with serious disparities among the populations affected...
June 28, 2017: Sexually Transmitted Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28704590/the-influence-of-democratic-racism-in-nursing-inquiry
#3
Carla T Hilario, Annette J Browne, Alysha McFadden
Neoliberal ideology and exclusionary policies based on racialized identities characterize the current contexts in North America and Western Europe. Nursing knowledge cannot be abstracted from social, political and historical contexts; the task of examining the influence of race and racial ideologies on disciplinary knowledge and inquiry therefore remains an important task. Contemporary analyses of the role and responsibility of the discipline in addressing race-based health and social inequities as a focus of nursing inquiry remain underdeveloped...
July 13, 2017: Nursing Inquiry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28444629/stress-measured-by-allostatic-load-score-varies-by-reason-for-immigration-the-africans-in-america-study
#4
Jean N Utumatwishima, Rafeal L Baker, Brianna A Bingham, Stephanie T Chung, David Berrigan, Anne E Sumner
OBJECTIVE: Reason for immigration as a biological stress has not been studied in Africans. Our goal was to determine in African immigrants, if biological stress measured by allostatic load score (ALS) varies by reason for immigration. METHODS: Using an ALS which had been previously developed with the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data to assess stress due to racism and nativity, ALS was calculated in 85 African immigrants (67% male, age 42 ± 10 years)...
April 25, 2017: Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28259213/movement-advocacy-personal-relationships-and-ending-health-care-disparities
#5
Marshall H Chin
Deep-rooted structural problems drive health care disparities. Compounding the difficulty of attaining health equity, solutions in clinics and hospitals require the cooperation of clinicians, administrators, patients, and the community. Recent protests over police brutality and racism on campuses across America have opened fresh wounds over how best to end racism, with lessons for achieving health equity. Movement advocacy, the mobilizing of the people to raise awareness of an injustice and to advocate for reform, can break down ingrained structural barriers and policies that impede health equity...
April 2017: Journal of the National Medical Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27530166/race-religion-and-a-cat-in-the-clinical-hour
#6
Gretchen Heyer
Racial and religious identities are complex, often mired in dynamics of 'othering'. Such dynamics easily become a means of distancing the pain, fear and rage of intergenerational traumas, thus undermining ways race and religion can be powerful vehicles for the transference and countertransference. Drawing from a history of race in America as well as Jung's anxiety when meeting the stranger within himself, this paper focuses on 17 years of work between a black female patient and white female clinician (me)...
September 2016: Journal of Analytical Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27117187/injecting-drugs-in-tight-spaces-hiv-cocaine-and-collinearity-in-the-downtown-eastside-vancouver-canada
#7
Daniel Ciccarone, Philippe Bourgois
This commentary revisits the political turmoil and scientific controversy over epidemiological study findings linking high HIV seroincidence to syringe exchange attendance in Vancouver in the mid-1990s. The association was mobilized polemically by US politicians and hard-line drug warriors to attack needle exchange policies and funding. In turn, program restrictions limiting access to syringes at the Vancouver exchange may have interfaced with a complex conjunction of historical, geographic, political economic and cultural forces and physiological vulnerabilities to create an extraordinary HIV risk environment: (1) ghettoization of services for indigent populations in a rapidly gentrifying, post-industrial city; (2) rural-urban migration of vulnerable populations subject to historical colonization and current patterns of racism; and (3) the flooding of North America with inexpensive powder cocaine and heroin, and the popularity of crack...
July 2016: International Journal on Drug Policy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26760060/race-conscious-professionalism-and-african-american-representation-in-academic-medicine
#8
Brian W Powers, Augustus A White, Nancy E Oriol, Sachin H Jain
African Americans remain substantially less likely than other physicians to hold academic appointments. The roots of these disparities stem from different extrinsic and intrinsic forces that guide career development. Efforts to ameliorate African American underrepresentation in academic medicine have traditionally focused on modifying structural and extrinsic barriers through undergraduate and graduate outreach, diversity and inclusion initiatives at medical schools, and faculty development programs. Although essential, these initiatives fail to confront the unique intrinsic forces that shape career development...
July 2016: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26462404/redesigning-racial-caste-in-america-via-mass-incarceration
#9
Gilda Graff
This article argues that the era of mass incarceration can be understood as a new tactic in the history of American racism. Slavery was ended by the Civil War, but after Reconstruction, the gains of the former slaves were eroded by Jim Crow (a rigid pattern of racial segregation), lynching, disenfranchisement, sharecropping, tenantry, unequal educational resources, terrorism, and convict leasing. The Civil Rights Movement struck down legal barriers, but we have chosen to deal with the problems of poverty and race not so differently than we have in the past...
2015: Journal of Psychohistory
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26223560/using-a-participatory-action-research-framework-to-listen-to-aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-people-in-australia-about-pandemic-influenza
#10
Adrian Miller, Peter D Massey, Jenni Judd, Jenny Kelly, David N Durrheim, Alan R Clough, Rick Speare, Sherry Saggers
INTRODUCTION: This article describes the use and effectiveness of the participatory action research (PAR) framework to better understand community members' perceptions and risks of pandemic influenza. In 2009, the H1N1 influenza pandemic affected Indigenous populations more than non-Indigenous populations in Oceania and the Americas. Higher prevalence of comorbidities (diabetes, obesity, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) as well as pregnancy in Indigenous communities may have contributed to the higher risks of severe disease...
July 2015: Rural and Remote Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26168512/whites-see-racism-as-a-zero-sum-game-that-they-are-now-losing
#11
REVIEW
Michael I Norton, Samuel R Sommers
Although some have heralded recent political and cultural developments as signaling the arrival of a postracial era in America, several legal and social controversies regarding "reverse racism" highlight Whites' increasing concern about anti-White bias. We show that this emerging belief reflects Whites' view of racism as a zero-sum game, such that decreases in perceived bias against Blacks over the past six decades are associated with increases in perceived bias against Whites-a relationship not observed in Blacks' perceptions...
May 2011: Perspectives on Psychological Science: a Journal of the Association for Psychological Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26066958/black-lives-matter-a-commentary-on-racism-and-public-health
#12
Jennifer Jee-Lyn García, Mienah Zulfacar Sharif
The recent nonindictments of police officers who killed unarmed Black men have incited popular and scholarly discussions on racial injustices in our legal system, racialized police violence, and police (mis)conduct. What is glaringly absent is a public health perspective in response to these events. We aim to fill this gap and expand the current dialogue beyond these isolated incidents to a broader discussion of racism in America and how it affects the health and well-being of people of color. Our goal is not only to reiterate how salient structural racism is in our society, but how critical antiracist work is to the core goals and values of public health...
August 2015: American Journal of Public Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25733067/-one-of-the-most-uniform-races-of-the-entire-world-creole-eugenics-and-the-myth-of-chilean-racial-homogeneity
#13
Sarah Walsh
This article illuminates why Nicolás Palacios's 1904 monograph, Raza chilena: Libro escrito por un Chileno i para los Chilenos [Chilean Race: A Book Written by a Chilean for Chileans], is central to the creation of a myth of Chilean racial homogeneity at the turn of the twentieth century. Placing Palacios in the context of Latin American eugenic discourse, it demonstrates how he selected a specific racial origin story in order to accommodate his belief in racial hierarchy while also depicting race mixing in a positive light...
November 2015: Journal of the History of Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25710478/on-the-transgressiveness-of-ambiguity-richard-bruce-nugent-and-the-flow-of-sexuality-and-race
#14
J Edgar Bauer
The study focuses on the slender corpus of literary work by Harlem Renaissance poet, author and visual artist Richard Bruce Nugent (1906-1987), arguably America's foremost Black aesthete. As an individualist in the footsteps of post-Hegelian and pre-Nietzschean philosopher Max Stirner (1806-1856), Nugent sought to re-think sexuality and race beyond fixed schemes of categorial distribution. To this end, Nugent deployed a strategy of sexual and racial ambiguity that aimed at situating the uniquely sexed and raced individual within the continuities of ever-diversifying Nature...
2015: Journal of Homosexuality
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25304011/african-kaposi-s-sarcoma-in-the-light-of-global-aids-antiblackness-and-viral-visibility
#15
Pawan Singh, Lisa Cartwright, Cristina Visperas
Drawing on the theoretical frameworks of antiblackness and intersectionality and the concept of viral visibility, this essay attends to the considerable archive of research about endemic Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) in sub-Saharan Africa accrued during the mid-20th century. This body of data was inexplicably overlooked in Western research into KS during the first decade of the AIDS epidemic, during which period European and Mediterranean KS cases were most often cited as precedents despite the volume of African data available...
December 2014: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24985787/coronary-artery-disease-and-the-contours-of-pharmaceuticalization
#16
Anne Pollock, David S Jones
Coronary artery disease (CAD) has dominated mortality for most of the past century, not just in Europe and North America but worldwide. Treatments for CAD, both pharmaceutical and surgical, have become leading sectors of the healthcare economy. This paper focuses on the therapeutic landscape for CAD in the United States. We hope to add texture to the broader conversation of pharmaceuticalization explored in this issue by situating pharmaceutical therapies as just one element in the broader therapeutic terrain, alongside cardiac surgery and interventional cardiology...
April 2015: Social Science & Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24957692/the-color-of-health-skin-color-ethnoracial-classification-and-discrimination-in-the-health-of-latin-americans
#17
Krista M Perreira, Edward E Telles
Latin America is one of the most ethnoracially heterogeneous regions of the world. Despite this, health disparities research in Latin America tends to focus on gender, class and regional health differences while downplaying ethnoracial differences. Few scholars have conducted studies of ethnoracial identification and health disparities in Latin America. Research that examines multiple measures of ethnoracial identification is rarer still. Official data on race/ethnicity in Latin America are based on self-identification which can differ from interviewer-ascribed or phenotypic classification based on skin color...
September 2014: Social Science & Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24773007/race-and-bicultural-socialization-in-the-netherlands-norway-and-the-united-states-of-america-in-the-adoptions-of-children-from-india
#18
Maureen Riley-Behringer, Victor Groza, Wendy Tieman, Femmie Juffer
A cross-national sample of 622 internationally adopted children from India with White parents in The Netherlands (n = 409), Norway (n = 146), and the United States (n = 67) was used to contrast country-specific bicultural socialization (BCS) practices among families of transracial intercountry adoption. The 3 countries vary in their degrees of minority (US > Netherlands > Norway) and Indian populations (US > Norway > Netherlands). The current study examined parental survey trends among BCS practices, children's negative encounters about adoption, racial and positive discrimination, and parental worry about these issues...
April 2014: Cultural Diversity & Ethnic Minority Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24585629/jane-cooke-wright-1919-2013-pioneering-oncologist-woman-and-humanitarian
#19
Harriet L Crosby
Jane Wright was a fundamental researcher in cancer chemotherapy in the 1950s-1980s and was one of the first scientists to test anti-cancer drugs on humans rather than solely on mice, discovering the use of the popular antimetabolite drug methotrexate on solid tumours. From her research she was able to conclude which specific anti-cancer agents would have the greatest lethal effect on a patient's certain cancer type and she invented a method of delivering chemotherapy agents directly to an internal cancer site...
February 2016: Journal of Medical Biography
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24298198/globalization-and-inequality-explaining-american-exceptionalism
#20
Douglas S Massey
Globalization creates pressure for greater inequality throughout the world, but these pressures are expressed more fully in the United States than in other developed nations. Although the distribution of US income before taxes is no more unequal than other nations, after taxes it is considerably less egalitarian. This occurs because of specific institutional arrangements that fail to redistribute income effectively and allow the pressures of globalization to be fully realized. These arrangements represent a shift from the past and were deliberately enacted over the past two decades with divergent consequences for those at the top and bottom of the socioeconomic hierarchy...
January 1, 2009: European Sociological Review
keyword
keyword
120793
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"