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Carbohydrate mouth rinsing

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27930449/quantifying-the-effect-of-carbohydrate-mouth-rinsing-on-exercise-performance
#1
Daniel J Peart
The purpose of this study was to review the existing literature investigating carbohydrate mouth rinsing (CMR) as an ergogenic aid by using the effect sizes and percentage change in performance of the respective studies as outcome measures. A trivial-small average overall effect size was present for the 25 studies included in the review (0.18, 95% CI = 0.10 to 0.27). Effect sizes for the sub-groups were; ≥25-min (0.25, 95% CI = 0.14 to 0.36), ≤ 180 seconds (0.06, 95% CI = -0.03 to 0.15), resistance exercise (-0...
November 19, 2016: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27832548/mouth-rinsing-with-a-sweet-solution-increases-energy-expenditure-and-decreases-appetite-during-60-min-of-self-regulated-walking-exercise
#2
Kevin Deighton, Lauren Duckworth, Jamie Matu, Matthew Suter, Charlotte Fletcher, Samuel Stead, Shaho Ali, Neil Gunby, Keelie Korsness
Carbohydrate mouth rinsing can improve endurance exercise performance and is most ergogenic when exercise is completed in the fasted state. This strategy may also be beneficial to increase exercise capacity and the energy deficit achieved during moderate-intensity exercise relevant to weight control when performed after an overnight fast. Eighteen healthy men (mean (SD); age, 23 (4) years; body mass index, 23.1 (2.4) kg·m(-2)) completed a familiarisation trial and 3 experimental trials. After an overnight fast, participants performed 60 min of treadmill walking at a speed that equated to a rating of perceived exertion of 13 ("fairly hard")...
December 2016: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Physiologie Appliquée, Nutrition et Métabolisme
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27829323/the-effect-of-carbohydrate-mouth-rinsing-on-fencing-performance-and-cognitive-function-following-fatigue-inducing-fencing
#3
G Rowlatt, L Bottoms, C J Edmonds, R Buscombe
This study investigated the impact that mouth rinsing carbohydrate solution has on skill-specific performance and reaction time following a fatigue-inducing bout of fencing in epee fencers. Nine healthy, national-level epee fencers visited a laboratory on two occasions, separated by a minimum of five days, to complete a 1-minute lunge test and Stroop test pre- and post-fatigue. Heart rate and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were recorded during completion of the fatiguing protocol. Between fights the participant's mouth rinsed for 10 seconds, either 25 ml of 6...
November 9, 2016: European Journal of Sport Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27686403/influence-of-a-caffeine-mouth-rinse-on-sprint-cycling-following-glycogen-depletion
#4
Joseph Kizzi, Alvin Sum, Fraser E Houston, Lawrence D Hayes
Attenuated performance during intense exercise with limited endogenous carbohydrate (CHO) is well documented. Therefore, this study examined whether caffeine (CAF) mouth rinsing would augment performance during repeated sprint cycling in participants with reduced endogenous CHO. Eight recreationally active males (aged 23 ± 2 yr, body mass 84 ± 4 kg, stature 178 ± 7 cm) participated in this randomized, single-blind, repeated-measures crossover investigation. Following familiarization, participants attended two separate evening glycogen depletion sessions...
November 2016: European Journal of Sport Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27657117/carbohydrate-mouth-rinsing-enhances-high-intensity-time-trial-performance-following-prolonged-cycling
#5
Nicholas D Luden, Michael J Saunders, Andrew C D'Lugos, Mark W Pataky, Daniel A Baur, Caitlin B Vining, Adam B Schroer
There is good evidence that mouth rinsing with carbohydrate (CHO) solutions can enhance endurance performance (≥30 min). The impact of a CHO mouth rinse on sprint performance has been less consistent, suggesting that CHO may confer benefits in conditions of 'metabolic strain'. To test this hypothesis, the current study examined the impact of late-exercise mouth rinsing on sprint performance. Secondly, we investigated the effects of a protein mouth rinse (PRO) on performance. Eight trained male cyclists participated in three trials consisting of 120 min of constant-load cycling (55% Wmax) followed by a 30 km computer-simulated time trial, during which only water was provided...
2016: Nutrients
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27616732/no-dose-response-effect-of-carbohydrate-mouth-rinse-on-cycling-time-trial-performance
#6
Ruth M James, Sarah Ritchie, Ian Rollo, Lewis J James
The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of mouth rinsing carbohydrate at increasing concentrations on ~1 h cycle time trial performance. Eleven male cyclists completed three experimental trials, following an overnight fast. Cyclists performed a ~1 h time trial on a cycle ergometer, while rinsing their mouth for 5 s with either a 7% maltodextrin solution (CHO), 14% CHO or a taste-matched placebo (PLA) after every 12.5% of the set amount of work. Heart rate was recorded every 12.5% of the time trial, whilst RPE and GI comfort were determined every 25% of the time trial...
September 6, 2016: International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27379953/no-dose-response-effect-of-carbohydrate-mouth-rinse-concentration-on-5-km-running-performance-in-recreational-athletes
#7
Neil D Clarke, James R Thomas, Marion Kagka, Roger Ramsbottom, Anne Delextrat
Oral carbohydrate rinsing has been demonstrated to provide beneficial effects on exercise performance of durations of up to one hour, albeit predominately in a laboratory setting. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of different concentrations of carbohydrate solution mouth-rinse on 5 km running performance. Fifteen healthy men (n=9; mean±SD age: 42±10 years; height: 177.6±6.1 cm; body mass: 73.9±8.9 kg) and women (n=6; mean±SD age: 43±9 years; height: 166.5±4.1 cm; body mass: 65...
June 30, 2016: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27359530/carbohydrate-mouth-rinsing-does-not-alter-skeletal-muscle-contractile-properties-following-fatigue-275-board-112-june-1-11-00-am-12-30-pm
#8
Daniel J Schubert, Marcin K Szczyglowski, Joshua D Wren, Christopher D Black
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2016: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27359528/carbohydrate-mouth-rinsing-does-not-enhance-maximal-strength-or-motor-unit-recruitment-following-fatigue-273-board-110-june-1-11-00-am-12-30-pm
#9
Marcin K Szczyglowski, Joshua D Wren, Daniel J Schubert, Christopher D Black
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2016: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27359527/carbohydrate-mouth-rinse-following-fatiguing-resistance-exercise-does-not-improve-muscle-function-272-board-109-june-1-11-00-am-12-30-pm
#10
Cortney N Steele, Rebecca F Hale, Andrea J Fradkin, Joseph L Andreacci, Eric S Rawson
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2016: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27359517/effects-of-carbohydrate-mouth-rinsing-on-depleted-state-wrestlers-using-a-yo-yo-ir-level-2-intermittent-test-262-board-99-june-1-11-00-am-12-30-pm
#11
Luke W Knoche, Colton E Belitz, Brian S Snyder
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2016: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27339107/effects-of-various-concentrations-of-carbohydrate-mouth-rinse-on-cycling-performance-in-a-fed-state
#12
Simon Devenney, Kieran Collins, Marcus Shortall
The objective of this study was to identify the effects of mouth rinsing with a 6% and 16% carbohydrate solution (CHO) on time trial performance when compared to a 0% control (PLA) when in a fed state. Twelve recreationally active males underwent three trials by which they had to complete a set workload (600 ± 65 W) in a fed state. Throughout each trial, participants rinsed their mouths with a 25 ml bolus of a 0% PLA, 6% or 16% CHO (maltodextrin) for every 12.5% of work completed. Rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and heart rate were recorded every 12...
November 2016: European Journal of Sport Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27171108/mouth-rinsing-with-maltodextrin-solutions-fails-to-improve-time-trial-endurance-cycling-performance-in-recreational-athletes
#13
Tuğba Nilay Kulaksız, Şükran Nazan Koşar, Suleyman Bulut, Yasemin Güzel, Marcus Elisabeth Theodorus Willems, Tahir Hazir, Hüseyin Hüsrev Turnagöl
The carbohydrate (CHO) concentration of a mouth rinsing solution might influence the CHO sensing receptors in the mouth, with consequent activation of brain regions involved in reward, motivation and regulation of motor activity. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of maltodextrin mouth rinsing with different concentrations (3%, 6% and 12%) after an overnight fast on a 20 km cycling time trial performance. Nine recreationally active, healthy males (age: 24 ± 2 years; V ˙ O 2 m a x : 47 ± 5 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) participated in this study...
2016: Nutrients
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27128664/cho-mouth-rinse-ameliorates-neuromuscular-response-with-lower-endogenous-cho-stores
#14
Thays Ataide-Silva, Thaysa Ghiarone, Romulo Bertuzzi, Christos George Stathis, Carol Góis Leandro, Adriano Eduardo Lima-Silva
PURPOSE: This study aimed to investigate carbohydrate (CHO) mouth rinse response on neuromuscular activity, fuel oxidation rates, and cycling performance with different initial levels of endogenous CHO availability. METHODS: In a double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled design, eight males completed six experimental mouth rinse trials: CHO (6.4% maltodextrin) or placebo solution in a fed state (FED), 12-h fasted state (FAST), or a combined exercise-depleted muscle glycogen and 12-h fasted state (DEP)...
September 2016: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27110224/carbohydrate-mouth-rinsing-has-no-effect-on-power-output-during-cycling-in-a-glycogen-reduced-state
#15
Ajmol Ali, Michelle Ji Yeon Yoo, Catherine Moss, Bernhard H Breier
BACKGROUND: The effect of mouth rinsing with a carbohydrate (CHO) solution on exercise performance is inconclusive with no benefits observed in the fed state. This study examined the effect of CHO mouth rinse or CHO ingestion on performance in 9 moderately trained male cyclists. METHODS: Four trials were undertaken, separated by 7 days, in a randomized, counterbalanced design. Each trial included a 90-min glycogen-reducing exercise protocol, immediately followed by a low CHO meal and subsequent overnight fast; the following morning a 1-h cycling time trial was conducted...
2016: Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27045602/does-carbohydrate-intake-during-endurance-running-improve-performance-a-critical-review
#16
Patrick B Wilson
Wilson, PB. Does carbohydrate intake during endurance running improve performance? A critical review. J Strength Cond Res 30(12): 3539-3559, 2016-Previous review articles assessing the effects of carbohydrate ingestion during prolonged exercise have not focused on running. Given the popularity of distance running and the widespread use of carbohydrate supplements, this article reviewed the evidence for carbohydrate ingestion during endurance running. The criteria for inclusion were (a) experimental studies reported in English language including a performance task, (b) moderate-to-high intensity exercise >60 minutes (intermittent excluded), and (c) carbohydrate ingestion (mouth rinsing excluded)...
December 2016: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27005660/carbohydrate-mouth-rinse-maintains-muscle-electromyographic-activity-and-increases-time-to-exhaustion-during-moderate-but-not-high-intensity-cycling-exercise
#17
Victor José Bastos-Silva, Alan de Albuquerque Melo, Adriano Eduardo Lima-Silva, Felipe Arruda Moura, Rômulo Bertuzzi, Gustavo Gomes de Araujo
The aim was to investigate the influence of a carbohydrate (CHO) mouth rinse on the vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) electromyographic activity (EMG) and time to exhaustion (TE) during moderate (MIE) and high-intensity cycling exercise (HIE). Thirteen participants cycled at 80% of their respiratory compensation point and at 110% of their peak power output to the point of exhaustion. Before the trials and every 15 min during MIE, participants rinsed with the CHO or Placebo (PLA) solutions. The root mean square was calculated...
March 2016: Nutrients
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27000831/new-insights-into-enhancing-maximal-exercise-performance-through-the-use-of-a-bitter-tastant
#18
Sharon Gam, Kym J Guelfi, Paul A Fournier
It is generally acknowledged that for an orally administered ergogenic aid to enhance exercise performance it must first be absorbed by the gastrointestinal tract before exerting its effects. Recently, however, it has been reported that some ergogenic aids can affect exercise performance without prior absorption by the gastrointestinal tract. This is best illustrated by studies that have shown that rinsing the mouth with a carbohydrate (CHO) solution, without swallowing it, significantly improves exercise performance...
October 2016: Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26635634/thermal-and-cardiovascular-strain-mitigate-the-potential-benefit-of-carbohydrate-mouth-rinse-during-self-paced-exercise-in-the-heat
#19
Matthew N Cramer, Martin W Thompson, Julien D Périard
PURPOSE: To determine whether a carbohydrate mouth rinse can alter self-paced exercise performance independently of a high degree of thermal and cardiovascular strain. METHODS: Eight endurance-trained males performed two 40-km cycling time trials in 35°C, 60% RH while swilling a 20-ml bolus of 6.5% maltodextrin (CHO) or a color- and taste-matched placebo (PLA) every 5 km. Heart rate, power output, rectal temperature (Tre), and mean skin temperature (Tsk) were recorded continuously; cardiac output, oxygen uptake (VO2), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and perceived exertion (RPE) were measured every 10 min...
2015: Frontiers in Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26498427/carbohydrate-ingestion-but-not-mouth-rinse-maintains-sustained-attention-when-fasted
#20
Namrita Kumar, Lewis A Wheaton, Teresa K Snow, Melinda Millard-Stafford
UNLABELLED: Carbohydrate (CHO) receptors in the mouth signal brain areas involved in cognitive tasks relying upon motivation and task persistence; however, the minimal CHO dose that improves mental activity is unclear. PURPOSE: To determine if CHO (via ingestion or oral rinse) influences sustained attention without eliciting glycemic responses when in a fasted state. METHODS: Study A: Six healthy adults completed five treatment trials, ingesting 0-6% CHO solutions to evaluate glycemic response...
January 1, 2016: Physiology & Behavior
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