Read by QxMD icon Read

conservation genetics

Irving E Wang, Thomas R Clandinin
The activity and maintenance of neurons requires substantial metabolic energy, resulting in selective pressure to decrease resource consumption by the nervous system. The wiring economy principle proposes that animals have evolved mechanisms that wire circuits efficiently by minimizing neurite length. Computational modeling of neuronal morphology, microcircuit organization, and neural networks reveals that wiring economy is a significant determinant of nervous system layout. The strategies for reducing wiring costs are shared across phyla and point to the possibility of generalizable rules that specify the development of efficient nervous systems...
October 24, 2016: Current Biology: CB
Daniel M Bear, Jean-Marc Lassance, Hopi E Hoekstra, Sandeep Robert Datta
Evolution sculpts the olfactory nervous system in response to the unique sensory challenges facing each species. In vertebrates, dramatic and diverse adaptations to the chemical environment are possible because of the hierarchical structure of the olfactory receptor (OR) gene superfamily: expansion or contraction of OR subfamilies accompanies major changes in habitat and lifestyle; independent selection on OR subfamilies can permit local adaptation or conserved chemical communication; and genetic variation in single OR genes can alter odor percepts and behaviors driven by precise chemical cues...
October 24, 2016: Current Biology: CB
Jean-Stéphane Joly, Gaelle Recher, Alessandro Brombin, Kathy Ngo, Volker Hartenstein
The visual systems of vertebrates and many other bilaterian clades consist of complex neural structures guiding a wide spectrum of behaviors. Homologies at the level of cell types and even discrete neural circuits have been proposed, but many questions of how the architecture of visual neuropils evolved among different phyla remain open. In this review we argue that the profound conservation of genetic and developmental steps generating the eye and its target neuropils in fish and fruit flies supports a homology between some core elements of bilaterian visual circuitries...
October 24, 2016: Current Biology: CB
Aung Kyaw Lwin, Edoardo Bertolini, Mario Enrico Pè, Andrea Zuccolo
Transposable elements (TEs) are the most abundant genetic material for almost all eukaryotic genomes. Their effects on the host genomes range from an extensive size variation to the regulation of gene expression, altering gene function and creating new genes. Because of TEs pivotal contribute to the host genome structure and regulation, their identification and characterization provide a wealth of useful data for gaining an in-depth understanding of host genome functioning. The giant reed (Arundo donax) is a perennial rhizomatous C3 grass, octadecaploid, with an estimated nuclear genome size of 2744 Mbp...
October 24, 2016: Molecular Genetics and Genomics: MGG
Chimoné S Dalton, Karen van de Rakt, Åsa Fahlman, Kathreen Ruckstuhl, Peter Neuhaus, Richard Popko, Susan Kutz, Frank van der Meer
Herpesviruses (HVs) have a wide range of hosts in the animal kingdom. The result of infection with HVs can vary from asymptomatic to fatal diseases depending on subtype, strain, and host. To date, little is known about HVs naturally circulating in wildlife species and the impact of these viruses on other species. In our study, we used genetic and comparative approaches to increase our understanding of circulating HVs in Canadian wildlife. Using nested polymerase chain reaction targeting a conserved region of the HV DNA polymerase gene, we analyzed material derived from wildlife of western and northern Canada collected between February 2009 and Sept 2014...
October 24, 2016: Archives of Virology
W S Hambright, Jie Deng, James M Tiedje, Ingrid Brettar, Jorge L M Rodrigues
In bacterial populations, subtle expressional differences may promote ecological specialization through the formation of distinct ecotypes. In a barrier-free habitat, this process most likely precedes population divergence and may predict speciation events. To examine this, we used four sequenced strains of the bacterium Shewanella baltica, OS155, OS185, OS195, and OS223, as models to assess transcriptional variation and ecotype formation within a prokaryotic population. All strains were isolated from different depths throughout a water column of the Baltic Sea, occupying different ecological niches characterized by various abiotic parameters...
September 2016: MSphere
Alesandro S Santos, Eliana Cazetta, Pavel Dodonov, Deborah Faria, Fernanda A Gaiotto
Habitat loss represents one of the main threats to tropical forests, which have reached extremely high rates of species extinction. Forest loss negatively impacts biodiversity, affecting ecological (e.g., seed dispersal) and genetic (e.g., genetic diversity and structure) processes. Therefore, understanding how deforestation influences genetic resources is strategic for conservation. Our aim was to empirically evaluate the effects of landscape-scale forest reduction on the spatial genetic structure and gene flow of Euterpe edulis Mart (Arecaceae), a palm tree considered a keystone resource for many vertebrate species...
September 2016: Ecology and Evolution
Jullien M Flynn, Frédéric J J Chain, Daniel J Schoen, Melania E Cristescu
Understanding the rates, spectra, and fitness effects of spontaneous mutations is fundamental to answering key questions in evolution, molecular biology, disease genetics and conservation biology. To estimate mutation rates and evaluate the effect of selection on new mutations, we propagated mutation accumulation (MA) lines of Daphnia pulex for more than 82 generations and maintained a non-MA population under conditions where selection could act. Both experiments were started with the same obligate asexual progenitor clone...
October 24, 2016: Molecular Biology and Evolution
Mark A Hanson, Phineas T Hamilton, Steve J Perlman
BACKGROUND: Drosophila is an important model for studying the evolution of animal immunity, due to the powerful genetic tools developed for D. melanogaster. However, Drosophila is an incredibly speciose lineage with a wide range of ecologies, natural histories, and diverse natural enemies. Surprisingly little functional work has been done on immune systems of species other than D. melanogaster. In this study, we examine the evolution of immune genes in the speciose subgenus Drosophila, which diverged from the subgenus Sophophora (that includes D...
October 24, 2016: BMC Evolutionary Biology
Julio Vargas, Vincenzo Landi, Amparo Martínez, Mayra Gómez, María Esperanza Camacho, Luz Ángela Álvarez, Lenin Aguirre, Juan Vicente Delgado
Macabea cattle are the only Bos taurus breed that have adapted to the wet tropical conditions of the Amazon. This breed has integrated into the culture of the indigenous Shuar-Asuar nations probably since its origins, being one of the few European zoogenetic resources assimilated by the deep-jungle Amazon communities. Despite its potential for local endogenous sustainable development, this breed is currently endangered. The present study used molecular genetics tools to investigate the within- and between-breeds diversity, in order to characterize the breed population, define its associations with other breeds, and infer its origin and evolution...
2016: PloS One
Katrin Ehlers, Amey S Bhide, Dawit G Tekleyohans, Benjamin Wittkop, Rod J Snowdon, Annette Becker
Seed formation is a pivotal process in plant reproduction and dispersal. It begins with megagametophyte development in the ovule, followed by fertilization and subsequently coordinated development of embryo, endosperm, and maternal seed coat. Two closely related MADS-box genes, SHATTERPROOF 1 and 2 (SHP1 and SHP2) are involved in specifying ovule integument identity in Arabidopsis thaliana. The MADS box gene ARABIDOPSIS BSISTER (ABS or TT16) is required, together with SEEDSTICK (STK) for the formation of endothelium, part of the seed coat and innermost tissue layer formed by the maternal plant...
2016: PloS One
Araceli Oropeza-Aburto, Alfredo Cruz-Ramírez, Javier Mora-Macías, Luis Herrera-Estrella
Phosphate (Pi) deficient soils are a major limitant factor for crop production in many regions in the world. Despite that plants have innovated several developmental and biochemical strategies to deal with this stress, there are still massive extensions of land which combine several abiotic stresses, including phosphate starvation, that limit their use for plant growth and food production. In several plant species a genetic program underlies the biochemical and developmental responses of the organism to cope with low phosphate (Pi) availability...
October 24, 2016: Plant Biotechnology Journal
C Elizabeth Oakley, Manmeet Ahuja, Wei-Wen Sun, Ruth Entwistle, Tomohiro Akashi, Junko Yaegashi, Chun-Jun Guo, Gustavo C Cerqueira, Jennifer Russo Wortman, Clay C C Wang, Yi-Ming Chiang, Berl R Oakley
Fungal secondary metabolites (SMs) are extremely important in medicine and agriculture, but regulation of their biosynthesis is incompletely understood. We have developed a genetic screen in Aspergillus nidulans for negative regulators of fungal SM gene clusters and we have used this screen to isolate mutations that upregulate transcription of the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase gene required for nidulanin A biosynthesis. Several of these mutations are allelic and we have identified the mutant gene by genome sequencing...
October 24, 2016: Molecular Microbiology
Tatiana V Tatarinova, Evgeny Chekalin, Yuri Nikolsky, Sergey Bruskin, Dmitry Chebotarov, Kenneth L McNally, Nickolai Alexandrov
We analyzed functionality and relative distribution of genetic variants across the complete Oryza sativa genome, using the 40 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) dataset from the 3,000 Rice Genomes Project (, the largest and highest density SNP collection for any higher plant. We have shown that the DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) are the most conserved group of genes, whereas kinases and membrane-localized transporters are the most variable ones. TFs may be conserved because they belong to some of the most connected regulatory hubs that modulate transcription of vast downstream gene networks, whereas signaling kinases and transporters need to adapt rapidly to changing environmental conditions...
October 24, 2016: Scientific Reports
Lize Cuypers, Guangdi Li, Christoph Neumann-Haefelin, Supinya Piampongsant, Pieter Libin, Kristel Van Laethem, Anne-Mieke Vandamme, Kristof Theys
Despite significant progress in hepatitis C (HCV) treatment, global viral eradication remains a challenge. An in-depth map of its genome diversity within the context of structural and immunological constraints could contribute to the design of pan-genotypic antivirals and preventive vaccines. For such analyses, extensive information is only available for the highly prevalent HCV genotypes (GT) 1a and 1b. Using 647 GT1a and 408 GT1b full-genome sequences obtained from the Los Alamos database, we found that respectively 3 per cent and 82 per cent of all codon positions are under positive and negative selective pressure, suggesting variation mainly accumulates due to random genetic drift...
July 2016: Virus Evolution
Hema Negi, Aparna Shukla, Feroz Khan, Rakesh Pandey
Remarkably the c-Jun-NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway is all evolutionarily conserved across species. In view of the hypothesis that increased stress resistance subdue aging, we investigated the role of ursolic acid (3β-Hydroxy-urs-12-en-28-oic acid; UA) in the pioneering aging model Caenorhabditis elegans with an increase in mean and maximum lifespan by up to 30%. Our genetic study unravelled the underlying pathway where JNK-1 is acting independently of insulin-IGF-1 signalling (IIS) pathway to modulate longevity...
October 20, 2016: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Zheng Huimei, Xiaohang Yang, Yongmei Xi
Remarkable advances have been made in recent years in our understanding of the Drosophila fat body and its functions in energy storage, immune response and nutrient sensing. The fat body interplays with other tissues to respond to the physiological needs of the body's growth and coordinates various metabolic processes at different developmental stages and under different environmental conditions. The identification of various conserved genetic functions and signaling pathways relating to the Drosophila fat body may provide clues to lipometabolic disease and other aspects of tissue remodeling in humans...
October 20, 2016: Life Sciences
Francisca Leal, Martin J Cohn
Limb reduction and loss are hallmarks of snake evolution. Although advanced snakes are completely limbless, basal and intermediate snakes retain pelvic girdles and small rudiments of the femur. Moreover, legs may have re-emerged in extinct snake lineages [1-5], suggesting that the mechanisms of limb development were not completely lost in snakes. Here we report that hindlimb development arrests in python embryos as a result of mutations that abolish essential transcription factor binding sites in the limb-specific enhancer of Sonic hedgehog (SHH)...
October 19, 2016: Current Biology: CB
Sergio Rey, Luana Schito, Marianne Koritzinsky, Bradly G Wouters
Hypoxia (low O2) is an essential microenvironmental driver of phenotypic diversity in human solid cancers. Hypoxic cancer cells hijack evolutionarily conserved, O2- sensitive pathways eliciting molecular adaptations that impact responses to radiotherapy, tumor recurrence and patient survival. In this review, we summarize the radiobiological, genetic, epigenetic and metabolic mechanisms orchestrating oncogenic responses to hypoxia. In addition, we outline emerging hypoxia- targeting strategies that hold promise for individualized cancer therapy in the context of radiotherapy and drug delivery...
October 19, 2016: Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews
Satoshi Komoto, Yaowapa Pongsuwanna, Ratana Tacharoenmuang, Ratigorn Guntapong, Tomihiko Ide, Kyoko Higo-Moriguchi, Takao Tsuji, Tetsushi Yoshikawa, Koki Taniguchi
Bovine group A rotavirus (RVA) is an important cause of acute diarrhea in calves worldwide. In order to obtain precise information on the origin and evolutionary dynamics of bovine RVA strains, we determined and analyzed the complete nucleotide sequences of the whole genomes of six archival bovine RVA strains; four Thai strains (RVA/Cow-tc/THA/A5-10/1988/G8P[1], RVA/Cow-tc/THA/A5-13/1988/G8P[1], RVA/Cow-tc/THA/61A/1989/G10P[5], and RVA/Cow-tc/THA/A44/1989/G10P[11]), one American strain (RVA/Cow-tc/USA/B223/1983/G10P[11]), and one Japanese strain (RVA/Cow-tc/JPN/KK3/1983/G10P[11])...
November 15, 2016: Veterinary Microbiology
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"