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Drug induced dyskinesia

Irina Tammenmaa-Aho, Rosie Asher, Karla Soares-Weiser, Hanna Bergman
BACKGROUND: Tardive dyskinesia (TD) remains a troublesome adverse effect of conventional antipsychotic (neuroleptic) medication. It has been proposed that TD could have a component of central cholinergic deficiency. Cholinergic drugs have been used to treat TD. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effects of cholinergic drugs (arecoline, choline, deanol, lecithin, meclofenoxate, physostigmine, RS 86, tacrine, metoxytacrine, galantamine, ipidacrine, donepezil, rivastigmine, eptastigmine, metrifonate, xanomeline, cevimeline) for treating antipsychotic-induced TD in people with schizophrenia or other chronic mental illness...
March 19, 2018: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Karla Soares-Weiser, John Rathbone, Yusuke Ogawa, Kiyomi Shinohara, Hanna Bergman
BACKGROUND: Antipsychotic (neuroleptic) medication is used extensively to treat people with chronic mental illnesses. Its use, however, is associated with adverse effects, including movement disorders such as tardive dyskinesia (TD) - a problem often seen as repetitive involuntary movements around the mouth and face. This review, one in a series examining the treatment of TD, covers miscellaneous treatments not covered elsewhere. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether drugs, hormone-, dietary-, or herb-supplements not covered in other Cochrane reviews on TD treatments, surgical interventions, electroconvulsive therapy, and mind-body therapies were effective and safe for people with antipsychotic-induced TD...
March 19, 2018: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
James B Leonard, Kashif M Munir, Hong K Kim
Metoclopramide (MCP) is a commonly used anti-emetic in the emergency department (ED). Its use is generally well tolerated; although infrequent adverse reactions such as extrapyramidal reactions or tardive dyskinesia are reported. However, many ED providers are not familiar with the potentially life-threatening hypertensive emergency that can be precipitated by MCP administration in patients with pheochromocytoma. A previously healthy 36-year-old woman presented to the ED with headache and nausea. She developed acute hypertensive emergency (acute agitation, worsening headache, chest pain and wide complex tachycardia) when her blood pressure (BP) increased to 223/102mmHg (initial BP, 134/86mmHg) after receiving intravenous MCP...
March 5, 2018: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
Hiroko Tsunekawa, Kazue Takahata, Motoki Okano, Toshiko Ishikawa, Hiroshi Satoyoshi, Tetsuya Nishimura, Naoya Hoshino, Shizuko Muraoka
3,4-Dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (L-Dopa) remains the most effective drug for treating the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, its long-term use is limited due to motor complications such as wearing-off and dyskinesia. A clinical study in PD patients with motor complications has demonstrated that selegiline, a monoamine oxidase type B inhibitor, is effective in reducing off time without worsening dyskinesia, although another study has shown worsening dyskinesia. Here, using unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats showing degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons and L-Dopa-induced motor complications, we determined the efficacy of selegiline in controlling L-Dopa-induced motor fluctuations and exacerbated dyskinesia...
March 8, 2018: Behavioural Brain Research
Leslie Citrome
Tardive dyskinesia (TD) has long been thought to be a generally irreversible consequence of the use of dopamine receptor blocking agents. There is now an opportunity to successfully manage this condition with agents approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. This is important because TD has not been eliminated with the use of second-generation antipsychotics, and the expansion of antipsychotics to treat conditions other than schizophrenia has resulted in millions of additional individuals at risk for developing TD...
February 28, 2018: Journal of the Neurological Sciences
Divya M Radhakrishnan, Vinay Goyal
Parkinson's disease is a common movement disorder seen in neurological practice, but the diagnosis and management is challenging. The diagnosis is clinical and sometimes difficult, considering a large number of motor and non-motor symptoms in PD patients. The medical management of PD patients is difficult, as choices of drugs are limited and levodopa is the mainstay of treatment. However, levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) is commonly seen in Parkinson's disease patients treated with levodopa. This side effect is usually encountered after a long duration of treatment, but occasionally, this may be seen even after a few days or months of treatment...
March 2018: Neurology India
X A Perez, T Bordia, M Quik
Cholinergic signaling plays a key role in regulating striatal function. The principal source of acetylcholine in the striatum is the cholinergic interneurons which, although low in number, densely arborize to modulate striatal neurotransmission. This modulation occurs via strategically positioned nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors that influence striatal dopamine, GABA and other neurotransmitter release. Cholinergic interneurons integrate multiple striatal synaptic inputs and outputs to regulate motor activity under normal physiological conditions...
February 28, 2018: Journal of Neural Transmission
Nicki Niemann, Joseph Jankovic
Tardive dyskinesia (TD) encompasses the spectrum of iatrogenic hyperkinetic movement disorders following exposure to dopamine receptor-blocking agents (DRBAs). Despite the advent of atypical or second- and third-generation antipsychotics with a presumably lower risk of complications, TD remains a persistent and challenging problem. Prevention is the first step in mitigating the risk of TD, but early recognition, gradual withdrawal of offending medications, and appropriate treatment are also critical. As TD is often a persistent and troublesome disorder, specific antidyskinetic therapies are often needed for symptomatic relief...
February 26, 2018: Drugs
Luz M Suarez, Samuel Alberquilla, Jose R García-Montes, Rosario Moratalla
In toxin-based models of Parkinson's disease (PD), striatal projection neurons (SPNs) exhibit dendritic atrophy and spine loss concurrent with an increase in excitability. Chronic L-DOPA-treatment that induces dyskinesia selectively restores spine density and excitability in indirect pathway SPNs (iSPNs), whereas spine loss and hyper-excitability persist in direct pathway SPNs (dSPNs). These alterations have only been characterized in toxin-based models of PD, raising the possibility that they are an artifact of exposure to the toxin, which may engage compensatory mechanisms independent of the PD-like pathology or due to the loss of dopaminergic afferents...
February 24, 2018: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
Li Eon Kuek, Paul Griffin, Paul Martinello, Alison N Graham, Paul Kalitsis, Philip J Robinson, Graham A Mackay
Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an inherited, currently incurable condition. In the respiratory system, PCD causes impaired functioning of the mucociliary escalator leading to nasal congestion, cough and recurrent otitis media which commonly progresses to cause more serious and permanent damage including hearing deficits, chronic sinusitis and bronchiectasis. New treatment options for the condition are thus necessary. In characterising an immortalised human bronchial epithelial cell line (BCi-NS1.1), grown at an air/liquid interface to permit differentiation, we have identified that these cells have dyskinetic motile cilia...
February 26, 2018: American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology
Manolo Carta, Anders Björklund
During the last decade, the serotonergic system has emerged as a key player in the appearance of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in animal models of Parkinson's disease. Clinical investigations, based on imaging and postmortem analyses, suggest that the serotonin neurons are also involved in the etiology of this complication of long-term L-DOPA treatment in parkinsonian patients. These findings have stimulated efforts to develop new therapies using drugs targeting the malfunctioning serotonin neurons. In this review, we summarize the experimental and clinical data obtained so far and discuss the prospects for further development of this therapeutic strategy...
February 26, 2018: Journal of Neural Transmission
Sakari Leino, Sini K Koski, Saara Rannanpää, Outi Salminen
The treatment of Parkinson's disease is often complicated by levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID), and antidyskinetic treatment options are currently sparse. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors have been suggested as potential targets for treatment of LID, as nicotinic agonists have been reported to alleviate LID in animal models. We aimed at the first independent replication of an antidyskinetic effect by nicotine using a mouse model of LID, and at investigation of its mechanisms by studying the release of [3 H]dopamine from synaptosomes prepared from the dorsal and ventral striatum...
February 20, 2018: Neuroscience Letters
Supriyo Choudhury, Koustav Chatterjee, Ravi Singh, Shantanu Shubham, Santosh Trivedi, Suparna Chatterjee, Hrishikesh Kumar
We reported a series of patients who presented with LSP-induced movement disorders specifically, dyskinetic movements. We have presented one case of LSP-induced parkinsonism and summarized ten cases of LSP-induced dyskinesia. The causality of the adverse drug reaction was assessed systematically using a validated rating system, and we extensively qualified the clinical presentation of each case of dyskinesia using a clinical rating scale. We described an unusual case of acute onset LSP-induced parkinsonism in a 56-year-aged female...
October 2017: Journal of Pharmacology & Pharmacotherapeutics
Lydia E Pieters, P Roberto Bakker, Peter N van Harten
Background: Drug-induced parkinsonism (DIP) is the most common movement disorder induced by antipsychotics. Although DIP is mostly symmetric, asymmetric DIP is reported in a substantial part of the patients. We investigated the frequency of motor asymmetry in DIP and its relationship to the severity of psychopathology in long-stay psychiatric patients. Methods: We obtained data from a cohort study of 207 long-stay psychiatric patients on the frequency and risk factors of tardive dyskinesia, akathisia, tardive dystonia, and DIP...
2018: Frontiers in Psychiatry
Karen Frei, Daniel D Truong, Stanley Fahn, Joseph Jankovic, Robert A Hauser
Since the original description of side effects of neuroleptics, different terminologies and definitions for tardive dyskinesia (TD) and tardive syndrome (TS) have been used by different authors, and often these two terms have been used interchangeably. This paper proposes a nosology designed to define and clarify various terms and phenomenologies within the TS spectrum. We propose to use the term tardive dyskinesia to refer to the original description of repetitive and complex oral-buccal-lingual (OBL) movements, as well as to the analogous repetitive movements that can appear in the limbs, trunk, or pelvis...
February 6, 2018: Journal of the Neurological Sciences
Michele Matarazzo, Alexandra Perez-Soriano, A Jon Stoessl
Throughout the years there has been a longstanding discussion on whether levodopa therapy in Parkinson's disease should be started in early vs. later stages, in order to prevent or delay motor complications such as fluctuations and dyskinesias. This controversial topic has been extensively debated for decades, and the prevailing view today is that levodopa should not be postponed. However, there is still fear associated with its use in early stages, especially in younger patients, who are more prone to develop dyskinesias...
February 10, 2018: Journal of Neural Transmission
Hanna Bergman, John Rathbone, Vivek Agarwal, Karla Soares-Weiser
BACKGROUND: Since the 1950s antipsychotic medication has been extensively used to treat people with chronic mental illnesses such as schizophrenia. These drugs, however, have also been associated with a wide range of adverse effects, including movement disorders such as tardive dyskinesia (TD) - a problem often seen as repetitive involuntary movements around the mouth and face. Various strategies have been examined to reduce a person's cumulative exposure to antipsychotics. These strategies include dose reduction, intermittent dosing strategies such as drug holidays, and antipsychotic cessation...
February 6, 2018: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Marc Morissette, Nicolas Morin, Claude Rouillard, Thérèse Di Paolo
The dopamine transporter (DAT) is abundantly expressed in the striatum where it removes extracellular dopamine into the cytosol of presynaptic nerve terminals. It is the target of drugs of abuse and antidepressants. There is a loss of the DAT in Parkinson's disease affecting release of levodopa implicated in levodopa-induced dyskinesias. This study investigated the effect of cholesterol on DAT, serotonin transporter (SERT) and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) in monkey and rat brains in vitro. DAT protein levels measured by Western blot remained unchanged with in vitro methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD) incubations to remove membrane cholesterol or with incubations to increase membrane cholesterol content...
January 30, 2018: Neuropharmacology
Ana Paula Chiapinotto Ceretta, Catiuscia Molz de Freitas, Larissa Finger Schaffer, Jeane Binotto Reinheimer, Mariana Maikéli Dotto, Elizete de Moraes Reis, Rahisa Scussel, Ricardo Andrez Machado-de-Ávila, Roselei Fachinetto
Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a common adverse effect observed in patients with long-term use of typical antipsychotic medications. A vacuous chewing movement (VCM) model induced by haloperidol has been used to study these abnormalities in experimental animals. The cause of TD and its treatment remain unknown, but several lines of evidence suggest that dopamine receptor supersensitivity and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) insufficiency play important roles in the development of TD. This study investigated the effects of treatment with the GABA-mimetic drug gabapentin on the development of haloperidol-induced VCMs...
January 25, 2018: Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior
Hanna Bergman, Paranthaman S Bhoopathi, Karla Soares-Weiser
BACKGROUND: Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a disfiguring movement disorder, often of the orofacial region, frequently caused by using antipsychotic drugs. A wide range of strategies have been used to help manage TD, and for those who are unable to have their antipsychotic medication stopped or substantially changed, the benzodiazepine group of drugs have been suggested as a useful adjunctive treatment. However, benzodiazepines are very addictive. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effects of benzodiazepines for antipsychotic-induced tardive dyskinesia in people with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or other chronic mental illnesses...
January 20, 2018: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
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