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Drug induced dyskinesia

O A Gan'kina, E E Vasenina, O S Levin, E Yu Fedotova, S N Illarioshkin
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disease. Literature sources indicate the association of PD and mutations in the glucocerebrosidase A (GBA) gene. According to our study, the frequency of the two most common mutations in the GBA gene, N370S and L444P, is 1.85%. Mutation carriers have slower progression of motor symptoms, but are more likely to develop drug-induced motor fluctuations and dyskinesia. In carriers of GBA mutations, the severity of cognitive impairment corresponds to age-matched patients without mutations...
2016: Zhurnal Nevrologii i Psikhiatrii Imeni S.S. Korsakova
Tanuja Bordia, Danhui Zhang, Xiomara A Perez, Maryka Quik
Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a drug-induced movement disorder that arises with antipsychotics. These drugs are the mainstay of treatment for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and are also prescribed for major depression, autism, attention deficit hyperactivity, obsessive compulsive and post-traumatic stress disorder. There is thus a need for therapies to reduce TD. The present studies and our previous work show that nicotine administration decreases haloperidol-induced vacuous chewing movements (VCMs) in rodent TD models, suggesting a role for the nicotinic cholinergic system...
September 19, 2016: Experimental Neurology
Raymond R MacNeil, Daniel J Müller
The effectiveness of antipsychotic drugs is limited due to accompanying adverse effects which can pose considerable health risks and lead to patient noncompliance. Pharmacogenetics (PGx) offers a means to identify genetic biomarkers that can predict individual susceptibility to antipsychotic-induced adverse effects (AAEs), thereby improving clinical outcomes. We reviewed the literature on the PGx of common AAEs from 2010 to 2015, placing emphasis on findings that have been independently replicated and which have additionally been listed to be of interest by PGx expert panels...
July 2016: Molecular Neuropsychiatry
Erum Shireen
Antipsychotic drugs are extensively prescribed for the treatment of schizophrenia and other related psychiatric disorders. These drugs produced their action by blocking dopamine (DA) receptors, and these receptors are widely present throughout the brain. Therefore, extended antipsychotic use also leads to severe extrapyramidal side effects. The short-term effects include parkinsonism and the later appearing tardive dyskinesia. Currently available treatments for these disorders are mostly symptomatic and insufficient, and are often linked with a number of detrimental side effects...
2016: Journal of Experimental Pharmacology
Keiko Toki, Masashi Yokose, Tetsuya Miyashita, Hitoshi Sato, Hiroko Fujimoto, Sayoko Yamamoto, Takahisa Goto
Regional anesthesia, especially epidural anesthesia, rarely causes involuntary movement Here we present a case of a patient who demonstrated myoclonus-like involuntary movement of the lower limbs during continuous infusion of ropivacaine, fentanyl, and droperidol through the thoracic epidural catheter. This movement disappeared when the epidural infusion was stopped, but reappeared when the epidural infusion was restarted. Naloxone did not eliminate the movement The patient was thereafter discharged uneventfully...
June 2016: Masui. the Japanese Journal of Anesthesiology
Matthieu F Bastide, Erwan Bézard
Involuntary movements, or dyskinesia, represent a debilitating complication of levodopa (L-dopa) therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD). L-dopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) is ultimately experienced by the vast majority of parkinsonian patients. Loss of dopamine in PD induces complex modifications in cellular signaling with numerous pathways showing altered responses to dopaminergic stimulation. Chronic L-dopa treatment further enhances the signaling alterations. The dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) signaling pathway has consistently been shown to be critically involved in LID genesis and manifestation in the striatum, the basal ganglia input structure...
February 2015: Bulletin de L'Académie Nationale de Médecine
Bernard Bioulac
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2015: Bulletin de L'Académie Nationale de Médecine
Glenn T Clark, Saravanan Ram
Orofacial movement disorders (OMDs) include dystonia, dyskinesia, drug-induced extrapyramidal reactions, and bruxism. The definition, epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical features, and management are detailed. OMDs are often disabling and affect patients' overall quality of life with pain, difficulty chewing food, speech difficulty, drooling, and social embarrassment. Management involves medications, botulinum toxin injections, and peripheral or central surgery. Botulinum toxin injections are the most effective management, often used in conjunction with medications...
August 2016: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
Małgorzata Michałowska, Urszula Fiszer, Tomasz Szatanowski
UNLABELLED: Chronic treatment with levodopa in Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with the risk of development of motor fluctuations and dyskinesias, i.e. motor levodopa-induced complications (MLIC). AIM: The aim of the study was to investigate factors influencing prevalence of MLIC in PD patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 76 patients with idiopathic PD were included in the study. Theirs mean disease duration was 10,33 years and mean levodopa therapy duration was 8,65 years...
June 2016: Polski Merkuriusz Lekarski: Organ Polskiego Towarzystwa Lekarskiego
Xuebing Cao, Dongzhi Hou, Lei Wang, Sai Li, Shengang Sun, Qineng Ping, Yan Xu
BACKGROUND: Chitosan, the N-deacetylated derivative of chitin, is a cationic polyelectrolyte due to the presence of amino groups, one of the few occurring in nature. The use of chitosan in protein and drug delivery systems is being actively researched and reported in the literature. RESULTS: In this study, we used chitosan-coated levodopa liposomes to investigate the behavioral character and the expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa (DARPP-32) and FosB/ΔFosB in striatum of rat model of levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID)...
2016: Biological Research
Alexander P Turner, Michael A Lones, Martin A Trefzer, Stephen L Smith, Stuart Jamieson, Jane E Alty, Jeremy Cosgrove, Andy M Tyrrell
Levodopa is a drug that is commonly used to treat movement disorders associated with Parkinson's disease. Its dosage requires careful monitoring, since the required amount changes over time, and excess dosage can lead to muscle spasms known as levodopa-induced dyskinesia. In this work, we investigate the potential for using epiNet, a novel artificial gene regulatory network, as a classifier for monitoring accelerometry time series data collected from patients undergoing levodopa therapy. We also consider how dynamical analysis of epiNet classifiers and their transitions between different states can highlight clinically useful information which is not available through more conventional data mining techniques...
August 2016: Bio Systems
Francesco Bez, Veronica Francardo, M Angela Cenci
Mice with striatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions are widely used as a model to study the effects of neurorestorative, symptomatic, or antidyskinetic treatments for Parkinson's disease (PD). The standard praxis is to utilize young adult mice with relatively acute 6-OHDA lesions. However, long post-lesion intervals may be required for longitudinal studies of treatment interventions, and the long-term stability of the model's behavioral and cellular phenotypes is currently unknown. In this study, C57Bl/6J mice sustained unilateral striatal 6-OHDA lesions at approx...
October 2016: Neurobiology of Disease
Antonio Daniele, Francesco Panza, Antonio Greco, Giancarlo Logroscino, Davide Seripa
At present, patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) are unsatisfactorily controlled by currently used anti-Parkinsonian dopaminergic drugs. Various studies suggest that therapeutic strategies based on nondopaminergic drugs might be helpful in PD. Zolpidem, an imidazopyridine widely used as sleep inducer, shows high affinity only for GABAA receptors containing the α-1 subunit and facilitates GABAergic neurotransmission through a positive allosteric modulation of GABAA receptors. Various observations, although preliminary, consistently suggest that in PD patients zolpidem may induce beneficial (and sometimes remarkable) effects on motor symptoms even after single doses and may also improve dyskinesias...
2016: Parkinson's Disease
Scott J Sherman, Miguel Estevez, Ari B Magill, Torsten Falk
Ketamine is an FDA-approved drug with a known safety profile. Low-dose subanesthetic intravenous ketamine infusion treatment has led to long-term reduction of treatment-resistant depression and of chronic pain states. We report on low-dose subanesthetic intravenous ketamine infusion treatment in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients by 5 case studies and show a long-lasting therapeutic benefit to reduce l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID), improve on time, and reduce depression. Based on the literature we hypothesize that low-dose ketamine may act as a 'chemical deep brain stimulation', by desynchronizing hypersynchronous oscillatory brain activity, including in the basal ganglia and the motor cortex...
January 2016: Case Reports in Neurology
John Yin, Alasdair M Barr, Alfredo Ramos-Miguel, Ric M Procyshyn
Chronic prescription of antipsychotics seems to lose its therapeutic benefits in the prevention of recurring psychotic symptoms. In many instances, the occurrence of relapse from initial remission is followed by an increase in dose of the prescribed antipsychotic. The current understanding of why this occurs is still in its infancy, but a controversial idea that has regained attention recently is the notion of iatrogenic dopamine supersensitivity. Studies on cell cultures and animal models have shown that long-term antipsychotic use is linked to both an upregulation of dopamine D2-receptors in the striatum and the emergence of enhanced receptor affinity to endogenous dopamine...
June 5, 2016: Current Neuropharmacology
Luis Ricardo Peroza, Larissa Finger Schaffer, Catiuscia Molz De Freitas, Caroline Queiroz Leal, Mayara Calegaro Ferrari, Marta Maria Frescura Duarte, Roselei Fachinetto
Antipsychotic drugs have been used in the treatment of schizophrenia and their long-term use can cause movement disorders, such as tardive dyskinesia (TD) in humans mainly typical ones such as haloperidol. Neuroinflammation has been implicated to the use of antipsychotics besides its participation in TD remains unclear. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the relation of cytokines with vacuous chewing movements (VCMs) in rats comparing typical and atypical antipsychotics. Rats were treated with haloperidol or risperidone for 28 days...
September 2016: Neurochemical Research
Maria Eliza Freitas, Susan H Fox
Parkinson's disease is primarily caused by dysfunction of dopaminergic neurons, however, nondopaminergic (ND) systems are also involved. ND targets are potentially useful to reduce doses of levodopa or to treat nonlevodopa-responsive symptoms. Recent studies have investigated the role of ND drugs for motor and nonmotor symptoms. Adenosine A2A receptor antagonists, mixed inhibitors of sodium/calcium channels and monoamine oxidase-B have recently been found to improve motor fluctuations. N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonists and serotonin 5HT1B receptor agonists demonstrated benefit in levodopa-induced dyskinesia...
June 2016: Neurodegenerative Disease Management
Naveed M Malek, Donald G Grosset
The authors review management issues in Parkinson's disease (PD) and provide an overview of the current pharmacological management strategies, with a specific focus on safinamide. Current therapeutic management of PD largely involves strategies to optimize the replacement of deficient dopamine, using levodopa, dopamine agonists, and inhibitors of dopamine-metabolizing enzymes. Currently under investigation for use in the treatment of PD, safinamide has multiple modes of action including monoamine oxidase B inhibition...
2012: Journal of Experimental Pharmacology
Stéphane Potvin, Emmanuel Stip, Serge Marchand
Several case reports have described stories of schizophrenia patients reporting no discomfort in response to several medical conditions which normally elicit pain. Comparatively, experimental studies performed on pain perception in schizophrenia have not documented hypoalgesic responses that are as frank as those reported in these clinical cases. Here, we report the case of a female patient with schizoaffective disorder, who displayed markedly reduced pain perception during an experimental heat pain paradigm...
2016: Case Reports in Psychiatry
Antoni Cortés, Estefanía Moreno, Mar Rodríguez-Ruiz, Enric I Canela, Vicent Casadó
INTRODUCTION: Dopamine is a neurotransmitter widely distributed in both the periphery and the central nervous system (CNS). Its physiological effects are mediated by five closely related G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are divided into two major subclasses: the D1-like (D1, D5) and the D2-like (D2, D3, D4) receptors. D3 receptors (D3Rs) have the highest density in the limbic areas of the brain, which are associated with cognitive and emotional functions. These receptors are therefore attractive targets for therapeutic management...
July 2016: Expert Opinion on Drug Discovery
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