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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28338241/neuroprotective-effects-of-loganin-on-mptp-induced-parkinson-s-disease-mice-neurochemistry-glial-reaction-and-autophagy-studies
#1
Yi-Da Xu, Chun Cui, Meng-Fei Sun, Ying-Li Zhu, Min Chu, Yun-Wei Shi, Stanley Li Lin, Xu-Sheng Yang, Yan-Qin Shen
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, involving resting tremor and bradykinesia, for which no recognized therapies or drugs are available to halt or slow progression. In recent years, natural botanic products have been considered relatively safe, with limited side effects, and are expected to become an important source for clinical mediation of PD in the future. Our study focuses on the ability of loganin, a compound derived from fruits of cornus, to mediate neuroprotection in a mouse model of PD...
March 24, 2017: Journal of Cellular Biochemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28317427/fatigue-is-it-all-neurochemistry
#2
Romain Meeusen, Bart Roelands
Fatigue during exercise can be approached from different angles. Peripheral fatigue is usually described as an impairment located in the muscle and characterized by a metabolic end point, while central fatigue is defined as a failure of the central nervous system to adequately drive the muscle. The aim of the present narrative review paper is to look at the mechanisms involved in the occurrence of fatigue during prolonged exercise, predominantly from a brain neurochemical point of view. From studies in rodents it is clear that exercise increases the release of several neurotransmitters in different brain regions, and that the onset of fatigue can be manipulated when dopaminergic influx in the preoptic and anterior hypothalamus is increased, interfering with thermoregulation...
March 19, 2017: European Journal of Sport Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28295336/neurochemistry-of-neurons-in-the-ventrolateral-medulla-activated-by-hypotension-are-the-same-neurons-activated-by-glucoprivation
#3
Lindsay M Parker, Sheng Le, Travis Wearne, Kate Hardwick, Natasha N Kumar, Katherine J Robinson, Simon McMullan, Ann K Goodchild
Previous studies have demonstrated that a range of stimuli activate neurons, including catecholaminergic neurons, in the ventrolateral medulla. Not all catecholaminergic neurons are activated and other neurochemical content is largely unknown hence whether stimulus specific populations exist is unclear. Here we determine the neurochemistry (using in situ hybridization) of catecholaminergic and non-catecholaminergic neurons which express c-Fos immunoreactivity throughout the rostrocaudal extent of the ventrolateral medulla, in Sprague Dawley rats treated with hydralazine or saline...
March 13, 2017: Journal of Comparative Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28262491/adaptation-of-circadian-neuronal-network-to-photoperiod-in-high-latitude-european-drosophilids
#4
Pamela Menegazzi, Elena Dalla Benetta, Marta Beauchamp, Matthias Schlichting, Ingolf Steffan-Dewenter, Charlotte Helfrich-Förster
The genus Drosophila contains over 2,000 species that, stemming from a common ancestor in the Old World Tropics, populate today very different environments [1, 2] (reviewed in [3]). We found significant differences in the activity pattern of Drosophila species belonging to the holarctic virilis group, i.e., D. ezoana and D. littoralis, collected in Northern Europe, compared to that of the cosmopolitan D. melanogaster, collected close to the equator. These behavioral differences might have been of adaptive significance for colonizing high-latitude habitats and hence adjust to long photoperiods...
March 20, 2017: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28261876/retraction
#5
(no author information available yet)
Retraction: "Chronic NMDA administration to rats up-regulates frontal cortex cytosolic phospholipase A2 and its transcription factor, activator protein-2" by Rao JS, Ertley RN, Rapoport SI, Bazinet RP, Lee HJ. The above article from Journal of Neurochemistry, published online on 13 April 2007 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com) and in volume 102, issue 6, pp. 1918-1927, has been retracted by agreement between the corresponding author Stanley Rapoport, co-author Richard Bazinet, the Journal's Editor-in-Chief Jörg Schulz, and John Wiley & Sons Ltd...
March 2017: Journal of Neurochemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28261875/retraction
#6
(no author information available yet)
Retraction: "Aging is associated with altered inflammatory, arachidonic acid cascade, and synaptic markers, influenced by epigenetic modifications, in the human frontal cortex" by Keleshian VL, Modi HR, Rapoport SI, Rao JS. The above article from Journal of Neurochemistry, published online on 17 February 2013 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com) and in volume 121, issue 1, pp. 63-73, has been retracted by agreement between the corresponding author Stanley Rapoport, the Journal's Editor-in-Chief, Jörg Schulz, and John Wiley & Sons Ltd...
March 2017: Journal of Neurochemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28251650/mechanisms-of-neuronal-migration-in-the-adult-brain
#7
REVIEW
Naoko Kaneko, Masato Sawada, Kazunobu Sawamoto
Adult neurogenesis was first observed nearly 60 years ago, and it has since grown into an important neurochemistry research field. Much recent research has focused on the treatment of brain diseases through neuronal regeneration with endogenously generated neurons. In the adult brain, immature neurons called neuroblasts are continuously generated in the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ). These neuroblasts migrate rapidly through the rostral migratory stream to the olfactory bulb, where they mature and are integrated into the neuronal circuitry...
March 2, 2017: Journal of Neurochemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28224681/modeling-human-methamphetamine-use-patterns-in-mice-chronic-and-binge-methamphetamine-exposure-reward-function-and-neurochemistry
#8
James P Kesby, Ariel Chang, Athina Markou, Svetlana Semenova
Different methamphetamine use patterns in human subjects may contribute to inconsistent findings regarding the effects of methamphetamine abuse on brain and behavior. The present study investigated whether human-derived chronic and binge methamphetamine use patterns have differential effects on reward and neurochemistry in mice. Brain reward function in mice was evaluated during acute/prolonged withdrawal, and in response to methamphetamine challenge using the intracranial self-stimulation procedure. Brain dopaminergic, serotonergic and glutamatergic neurochemistry was determined with high-performance liquid chromatography...
February 21, 2017: Addiction Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28224658/predictive-meta-regressions-relating-mercury-tissue-concentrations-of-freshwater-piscivorous-mammals
#9
Kristin M Eccles, Philippe J Thomas, Hing Man Chan
Mercury (Hg) is a pollutant of global concern. Sentinel species such as river otter (Lontra canadensis) and mink (Neovison vison) are often used to monitor environmental concentrations in freshwater ecosystems. Tissue total Hg (THg) concentrations are frequently used as biomarkers of exposure. However, there is no comprehensive model relating Hg tissue concentrations in different tissues, making interstudy comparisons challenging. Our objective was to establish conversion factors relating fur, brain, liver, kidney, and muscle THg concentrations using mean concentrations and standard errors reported in the literature...
February 22, 2017: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28223922/gut-microbiota-a-potential-regulator-of-neurodevelopment
#10
REVIEW
Paola Tognini
During childhood, our brain is exposed to a variety of environmental inputs that can sculpt synaptic connections and neuronal circuits, with subsequent influence on behavior and learning processes. Critical periods of neurodevelopment are windows of opportunity in which the neuronal circuits are extremely plastic and can be easily subjected to remodeling in response to experience. However, the brain is also more susceptible to aberrant stimuli that might lead to altered developmental trajectories. Intriguingly, postnatal brain development is paralleled by the maturation of the gut microbiota: the ecosystem of symbionts populating our gastro-intestinal tract...
2017: Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28213947/select-noxious-stimuli-induce-changes-on-corneal-nerve-morphology
#11
Deborah M Hegarty, Sam M Hermes, Katherine Yang, Sue A Aicher
The surface of the cornea contains the highest density of nociceptive nerves of any tissue in the body. These nerves are responsive to a variety of modalities of noxious stimuli and can signal pain even when activated by low threshold stimulation. Injury of corneal nerves can lead to altered nerve morphology, including neuropathic changes which can be associated with chronic pain. Emerging technologies that allow imaging of corneal nerves in vivo are spawning questions regarding the relationship between corneal nerve density, morphology and function...
February 18, 2017: Journal of Comparative Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28213446/acetylcholine-release-in-prefrontal-cortex-promotes-gamma-oscillations-and-theta-gamma-coupling-during-cue-detection
#12
W M Howe, H J Gritton, N Lusk, Erik A Roberts, Vaughn L Hetrick, Joshua D Berke, Martin Sarter
The capacity for using external cues to guide behavior ("cue detection") constitutes an essential aspect of attention and goal-directed behavior. The cortical cholinergic input system, via phasic increases in prefrontal acetylcholine release, plays an essential role in attention by mediating such cue detection. However, the relationship between cholinergic signaling during cue detection and neural activity dynamics in prefrontal networks remains unclear. Here we combined sub-second measures of cholinergic signaling, neurophysiological recordings, and cholinergic receptor blockade to delineate the cholinergic contributions to prefrontal oscillations during cue detection in rats...
February 17, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28202664/lrrk2-mouse-models-dissecting-the-behavior-striatal-neurochemistry-and-neurophysiology-of-pd-pathogenesis
#13
REVIEW
Mattia Volta, Heather Melrose
Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are the most common genetic cause of familial Parkinson's disease (PD), resembling the sporadic disorder. Intensive effort has been directed toward LRRK2 mouse modeling and investigation, aimed at reproducing the human disease to inform mechanistic studies of pathogenesis and design of neuroprotective therapies. The physiological function of LRRK2 is still under exploration, but a clear role in striatal neurophysiology and animal behavior has emerged. Alterations in LRRK2 impair dopamine (DA) transmission, regulation and signaling, in addition to corticostriatal synaptic plasticity...
February 8, 2017: Biochemical Society Transactions
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28199018/preface-60th-anniversary-of-the-japanese-society-for-neurochemistry
#14
REVIEW
Kazunori Imaizumi
To welcome the 60th anniversary of the Japanese Society for Neurochemistry, in this issue, we publish five Review articles from the society's leading groups in the Journal of Neurochemistry, and introduce what we have achieved in the neurochemical fields of research, including Ca2+ neurobiology, synaptic plasticity, neurogenesis and neuroregeneration. With the achievements in the past decades in mind, we will continue to contribute to the development of neurochemistry from now on too. This article is protected by copyright...
February 15, 2017: Journal of Neurochemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28193868/dopamine-in-the-medial-amygdala-network-mediates-human-bonding
#15
Shir Atzil, Alexandra Touroutoglou, Tali Rudy, Stephanie Salcedo, Ruth Feldman, Jacob M Hooker, Bradford C Dickerson, Ciprian Catana, Lisa Feldman Barrett
Research in humans and nonhuman animals indicates that social affiliation, and particularly maternal bonding, depends on reward circuitry. Although numerous mechanistic studies in rodents demonstrated that maternal bonding depends on striatal dopamine transmission, the neurochemistry supporting maternal behavior in humans has not been described so far. In this study, we tested the role of central dopamine in human bonding. We applied a combined functional MRI-PET scanner to simultaneously probe mothers' dopamine responses to their infants and the connectivity between the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), the amygdala, and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), which form an intrinsic network (referred to as the "medial amygdala network") that supports social functioning...
February 28, 2017: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28192451/in-vivo-functional-neurochemistry-of-human-cortical-cholinergic-function-during-visuospatial-attention
#16
Michael Lindner, Tiffany Bell, Somya Iqbal, Paul Gerald Mullins, Anastasia Christakou
Cortical acetylcholine is involved in key cognitive processes such as visuospatial attention. Dysfunction in the cholinergic system has been described in a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. Levels of brain acetylcholine can be pharmacologically manipulated, but it is not possible to directly measure it in vivo in humans. However, key parts of its biochemical cascade in neural tissue, such as choline, can be measured using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). There is evidence that levels of choline may be an indirect but proportional measure of acetylcholine availability in brain tissue...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28191447/reexamining-chronic-toxoplasma-gondii-infection-surprising-activity-for-a-dormant-parasite
#17
Anthony P Sinai, Elizabeth A Watts, Animesh Dhara, Robert D Murphy, Matthew S Gentry, Abhijit Patwardhan
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Despite over a third of the world's population being chronically infected with Toxoplasma gondii, little is known about this largely asymptomatic phase of infection. This stage is mediated in vivo by bradyzoites within tissue cysts. The absence of overt symptoms has been attributed to the dormancy of bradyzoites. In this review, we reexamine the conventional view of chronic toxoplasmosis in light of emerging evidence challenging both the nature of dormancy and the consequences of infection in the CNS...
December 2016: Current Clinical Microbiology Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28187816/multimodal-neurologic-monitoring
#18
REVIEW
G Korbakis, P M Vespa
Neurocritical care has two main objectives. Initially, the emphasis is on treatment of patients with acute damage to the central nervous system whether through infection, trauma, or hemorrhagic or ischemic stroke. Thereafter, attention shifts to the identification of secondary processes that may lead to further brain injury, including fever, seizures, and ischemia, among others. Multimodal monitoring is the concept of using various tools and data integration to understand brain physiology and guide therapeutic interventions to prevent secondary brain injury...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28167808/how-do-individuals-cope-with-stress-behavioural-physiological-and-neuronal-differences-between-proactive-and-reactive-coping-styles-in-fish
#19
Marco A Vindas, Marnix Gorissen, Erik Höglund, Gert Flik, Valentina Tronci, Børge Damsgård, Per-Ove Thörnqvist, Tom O Nilsen, Svante Winberg, Øyvind Øverli, Lars O E Ebbesson
Despite the use of fish models to study human mental disorders and dysfunctions, knowledge of regional telencephalic responses in non-mammalian vertebrates expressing alternate stress coping styles is poor. Since perception of salient stimuli associated with stress coping in mammals is mainly under forebrain limbic control, we tested region-specific forebrain neural (i.e mRNA abundance and monoamine neurochemistry) and endocrine responses at basal and acute stress conditions for previously characterised proactive and reactive Atlantic salmon...
February 6, 2017: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28164854/the-microbiome-gut-brain-axis-in-health-and-disease
#20
REVIEW
Timothy G Dinan, John F Cryan
Gut microbes are capable of producing most neurotransmitters found in the human brain. Evidence is accumulating to support the view that gut microbes influence central neurochemistry and behavior. Irritable bowel syndrome is regarded as the prototypic disorder of the brain-gut-microbiota axis that can be responsive to probiotic therapy. Translational studies indicate that certain bacteria may have an impact on stress responses and cognitive functioning. Manipulating the gut microbiota with psychobiotics, prebiotics, or even antibiotics offers a novel approach to altering brain function and treating gut-brain axis disorders, such as depression and autism...
March 2017: Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
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