Read by QxMD icon Read

Brain oscillation

Michela Balconi, Laura Gatti, Maria Elide Vanutelli
Cooperation behavior is a core question of study on social neuroscience. In the present study, inter-brain functional connectivity and cognitive performance were considered during joint which was failing. The cognitive performance and the EEG (brain oscillations from delta to beta) underlying the execution of joint-actions were recorded when dyads of participants executed synchronicity game and received reinforcing negative feedbacks A pre-feedback condition (cooperation) and a control condition (individual task, T0) were provided as well as a check for possible learning effect (time series analysis)...
March 12, 2018: Consciousness and Cognition
Stefan Elmer, Lutz Jäncke
Numerous studies have documented the behavioral advantages conferred on professional musicians and children undergoing music training in processing speech sounds varying in the spectral and temporal dimensions. These beneficial effects have previously often been associated with local functional and structural changes in the auditory cortex (AC). However, this perspective is oversimplified, in that it does not take into account the intrinsic organization of the human brain, namely, neural networks and oscillatory dynamics...
March 15, 2018: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Afrina Mustari, Naoki Nakamura, Satoko Kawauchi, Shunichi Sato, Manabu Sato, Izumi Nishidate
To evaluate cerebral hemodynamics and spontaneous low-frequency oscillations (SLFOs) of cerebral blood flow in rat brain, we investigated an imaging method using a digital RGB camera. In this method, the RGB values were converted into tristimulus values in the CIE (Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage) XYZ color space, which is compatible with the common RGB working spaces. Monte Carlo simulation for light transport in tissue was then used to specify the relationship among the tristimulus XYZ values and the concentrations of oxygenated hemoglobin ( C HbO ), deoxygenated hemoglobin ( C HbR ), and total hemoglobin ( C HbT ) and cerebral tissue oxygen saturation ( StO 2 )...
March 1, 2018: Biomedical Optics Express
Timothée Proix, Viktor K Jirsa, Fabrice Bartolomei, Maxime Guye, Wilson Truccolo
Recent studies have shown that seizures can spread and terminate across brain areas via a rich diversity of spatiotemporal patterns. In particular, while the location of the seizure onset area is usually invariant across seizures in an individual patient, the source of traveling (2-3 Hz) spike-and-wave discharges during seizures can either move with the slower propagating ictal wavefront or remain stationary at the seizure onset area. Furthermore, although many focal seizures terminate synchronously across brain areas, some evolve into distinct ictal clusters and terminate asynchronously...
March 14, 2018: Nature Communications
Jihwan Myung, Christoph Schmal, Sungho Hong, Yoshiaki Tsukizawa, Pia Rose, Yong Zhang, Michael J Holtzman, Erik De Schutter, Hanspeter Herzel, Grigory Bordyugov, Toru Takumi
Mammalian circadian clocks have a hierarchical organization, governed by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the hypothalamus. The brain itself contains multiple loci that maintain autonomous circadian rhythmicity, but the contribution of the non-SCN clocks to this hierarchy remains unclear. We examine circadian oscillations of clock gene expression in various brain loci and discovered that in mouse, robust, higher amplitude, relatively faster oscillations occur in the choroid plexus (CP) compared to the SCN...
March 14, 2018: Nature Communications
Li-Yuan Chen, Maxime Lévesque, Mauro Cataldi, Massimo Avoli
The muscarinic receptor agonist carbachol (CCh) can induce activity in the theta range (4 - 15 Hz) in the entorhinal cortex (EC), but the underlying network mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we investigated the interplay between interneurons and principal cells in the EC during CCh-induced theta-like field oscillations in an in vitro brain slice preparation using tetrodes. Field oscillations at 10.1 Hz (IQR = 9.5 - 10.9 Hz) occurred during bath application of CCh (100 μM; n = 32 experiments) and were associated with single-unit (n = 189) firing...
March 10, 2018: Neuroscience
Fatemeh Khadjevand, Jan Cimbalnik, Gregory A Worrell
High-frequency oscillations (HFOs: 100 - 600 Hz) have been widely proposed as biomarkers of epileptic brain tissue. In addition, HFOs over a broader range of frequencies spanning 30 - 2000 Hz are potential biomarkers of both physiological and pathological brain processes. The majority of the results from humans with focal epilepsy have focused on HFOs recorded directly from the brain with intracranial EEG (iEEG) in the high gamma (65 - 100 Hz), ripple (100 - 250 Hz), and fast ripple (250 - 600 Hz) frequency ranges...
December 2017: Current Opinion in Biomedical Engineering
P Lorenzo Bozzelli, Seham Alaiyed, Eunyoung Kim, Sonia Villapol, Katherine Conant
The perineuronal net (PNN) represents a lattice-like structure that is prominently expressed along the soma and proximal dendrites of parvalbumin- (PV-) positive interneurons in varied brain regions including the cortex and hippocampus. It is thus apposed to sites at which PV neurons receive synaptic input. Emerging evidence suggests that changes in PNN integrity may affect glutamatergic input to PV interneurons, a population that is critical for the expression of synchronous neuronal population discharges that occur with gamma oscillations and sharp-wave ripples...
2018: Neural Plasticity
Eline R Kupers, Helena X Wang, Kaoru Amano, Kendrick N Kay, David J Heeger, Jonathan Winawer
Currently, non-invasive methods for studying the human brain do not routinely and reliably measure spike-rate-dependent signals, independent of responses such as hemodynamic coupling (fMRI) and subthreshold neuronal synchrony (oscillations and event-related potentials). In contrast, invasive methods-microelectrode recordings and electrocorticography (ECoG)-have recently measured broadband power elevation in field potentials (~50-200 Hz) as a proxy for locally averaged spike rates. Here, we sought to detect and quantify stimulus-related broadband responses using magnetoencephalography (MEG)...
2018: PloS One
Sun Qifeng, Zhao Dechun, Cheng Shanshan, Hou Xiaorong, Zhao Xing, Tian Yin
Local field potential of a patient with Parkinson's disease often shows abnormal oscillation phenomenon. Extracting and studying this phenomenon and designing adaptive deep brain stimulation control library have great significance in treatment of patients. This paper has designed a feature extraction method based on modified empirical mode decomposition which extracts the abnormal oscillation signal in the time domain to increase the overall performance. The IMF component which contains abnormal oscillation is extracted by using empirical mode decomposition before an intrinsic characteristic of the oscillation signal is obtained...
March 12, 2018: International Journal of Neuroscience
Scott A Cairney, Anna Á Váli Guttesen, Nicole El Marj, Bernhard P Staresina
How are brief encounters transformed into lasting memories? Previous research has established the role of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, along with its electrophysiological signatures of slow oscillations (SOs) and spindles, for memory consolidation [1-4]. In related work, experimental manipulations have demonstrated that NREM sleep provides a window of opportunity to selectively strengthen particular memory traces via the delivery of auditory cues [5-10], a procedure known as targeted memory reactivation (TMR)...
March 2, 2018: Current Biology: CB
Elizabeth Heinrichs-Graham, Timothy J McDermott, Mackenzie S Mills, Alex I Wiesman, Yu-Ping Wang, Julia M Stephen, Vince D Calhoun, Tony W Wilson
Numerous studies connect beta oscillations in the motor cortices to volitional movement, and beta is known to be aberrant in multiple movement disorders. However, the dynamic interplay between these beta oscillations, motor performance, and spontaneous beta power (e.g., during rest) in the motor cortices remains unknown. This study utilized magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate these three parameters and their lifespan trajectory in 57 healthy participants aged 9-75 years old. Movement-related beta activity was imaged using a beamforming approach, and voxel time series data were extracted from the peak voxels in the primary motor cortices...
March 2, 2018: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
Matthew J Brookes, Madeleine J Groom, Lucrezia Liuzzi, Ryan M Hill, Helen J F Smith, Paul M Briley, Emma L Hall, Benjamin A E Hunt, Lauren E Gascoyne, Margot J Taylor, Peter F Liddle, Peter G Morris, Mark W Woolrich, Elizabeth B Liddle
Network connectivity is an integral feature of human brain function, and characterising its maturational trajectory is a critical step towards understanding healthy and atypical neurodevelopment. Here, we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate both stationary (i.e. time averaged) and rapidly modulating (dynamic) electrophysiological connectivity, in participants aged from mid-childhood to early adulthood (youngest participant 9 years old; oldest participant 25 years old). Stationary functional connectivity (measured via inter-regional coordination of neural oscillations) increased with age in the alpha and beta frequency bands, particularly in bilateral parietal and temporo-parietal connections...
March 7, 2018: NeuroImage
Sarah S Sheldon, Kyle E Mathewson
The phase of alpha (8-12 Hz) brain oscillations have been associated with moment to moment changes in visual attention and awareness. Previous work has demonstrated that endogenous oscillations and subsequent behavior can be modulated by oscillating transcranial current stimulation (otCS). The purpose of the current study is to establish the efficacy of cathodal otCS for modulation of the ongoing alpha brain oscillations, allowing for modulation of individual's visual perception. Thirty-six participants performed a target detection with sham and 10-Hz cathodal otCS...
2018: Frontiers in Neuroscience
Carlos Del Rio-Bermudez, Mark S Blumberg
A ubiquitous feature of active (REM) sleep in mammals and birds is its relative abundance in early development. In rat pups across the first two postnatal weeks, active sleep promotes the expression of synchronized oscillatory activity within and between cortical and subcortical sensorimotor structures. Sensory feedback from self-generated myoclonic twitches - which are produced exclusively during active sleep - also triggers neural oscillations in those structures. We have proposed that one of the functions of active sleep in early infancy is to provide a context for synchronizing developing structures...
March 6, 2018: BioEssays: News and Reviews in Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology
Jessica Page, Caroline Lustenberger, Flavio Fr Hlich
Widespread change in behavior and the underlying brain network substrate is a hallmark of early development. Sleep plays a fundamental role in this process. Both slow waves and spindles are key features of non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM) that exhibit pronounced developmental trajectories from infancy to adulthood. Yet, these prominent features of NREM sleep are poorly understood in infants and toddlers in the age range of 12 to 30 months. Moreover, it is unknown how network dynamics of NREM sleep are associated with outcomes of early development...
February 2, 2018: Sleep
Wei Cao, Shen Lin, Qiang-Qiang Xia, Yong-Lan Du, Qian Yang, Meng-Ying Zhang, Yi-Qing Lu, Jing Xu, Shu-Min Duan, Xia Jun, Guoping Feng, Junyu Xu, Jian-Hong Luo
Neuroligins (NLs) are critical for synapse formation and function. NL3 R451C is an autism-associated mutation. NL3 R451C knockin (KI) mice exhibit autistic behavioral abnormalities, including social novelty deficits. However, neither the brain regions involved in social novelty nor the underlying mechanisms are clearly understood. Here, we found decreased excitability of fast-spiking interneurons and dysfunction of gamma oscillation in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), which contributed to the social novelty deficit in the KI mice...
February 22, 2018: Neuron
Rainbo Hultman, Kyle Ulrich, Benjamin D Sachs, Cameron Blount, David E Carlson, Nkemdilim Ndubuizu, Rosemary C Bagot, Eric M Parise, Mai-Anh T Vu, Neil M Gallagher, Joyce Wang, Alcino J Silva, Karl Deisseroth, Stephen D Mague, Marc G Caron, Eric J Nestler, Lawrence Carin, Kafui Dzirasa
Brain-wide fluctuations in local field potential oscillations reflect emergent network-level signals that mediate behavior. Cracking the code whereby these oscillations coordinate in time and space (spatiotemporal dynamics) to represent complex behaviors would provide fundamental insights into how the brain signals emotional pathology. Using machine learning, we discover a spatiotemporal dynamic network that predicts the emergence of major depressive disorder (MDD)-related behavioral dysfunction in mice subjected to chronic social defeat stress...
March 1, 2018: Cell
Catherine L Tegeler, Lee Gerdes, Hossam A Shaltout, Jared F Cook, Sean L Simpson, Sung W Lee, Charles H Tegeler
BACKGROUND: Military-related post-traumatic stress (PTS) is associated with numerous symptom clusters and diminished autonomic cardiovascular regulation. High-resolution, relational, resonance-based, electroencephalic mirroring (HIRREM®) is a noninvasive, closed-loop, allostatic, acoustic stimulation neurotechnology that produces real-time translation of dominant brain frequencies into audible tones of variable pitch and timing to support the auto-calibration of neural oscillations. We report clinical, autonomic, and functional effects after the use of HIRREM® for symptoms of military-related PTS...
December 22, 2017: Military Medical Research
Halina Binde Doria, Marianna Boia Ferreira, Silvia Daniele Rodrigues, Sze Mei Lo, Cinthia Eloise Domingues, Lia Sumie Nakao, Sandro Xavier de Campos, Ciro Alberto de Oliveira Ribeiro, Marco Antonio Ferreira Randi
The circadian clock is a key cellular timing system that coordinates physiology and behavior. Light is a key regulator of the clock mechanism via its activation of Per and Cry clock gene expression. Evidence points to a key role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in resetting this process. In this context, the aim of the present study was to explore copper as a ROS generator, using an innovative approach investigating its effects on circadian timing. Liver and brain from Danio rerio specimens exposed to 0, 5, 25 and 45 μg/L copper concentrations were obtained...
February 27, 2018: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"