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(pediatric* OR child*) AND ("electronic prescri*" OR "e-prescri*" OR "electronic order*" OR CPOE) AND (hospital*)

Juan D Chaparro, David C Classen, Melissa Danforth, David C Stockwell, Christopher A Longhurst
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the safety of computerized physician order entry (CPOE) and associated clinical decision support (CDS) systems in electronic health record (EHR) systems at pediatric inpatient facilities in the US using the Leapfrog Group's pediatric CPOE evaluation tool. METHODS: The Leapfrog pediatric CPOE evaluation tool, a previously validated tool to assess the ability of a CPOE system to identify orders that could potentially lead to patient harm, was used to evaluate 41 pediatric hospitals over a 2-year period...
September 16, 2016: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association: JAMIA
Amanda Bevan, Niesh Patel
BACKGROUND: Whilst the prescribing of both in-patient and discharge medicines is electronic, there was no automatic notification to clinical pharmacists when a discharge prescription was ready to be screened. The notification required a member of medical or nursing staff to bleep their pharmacist informing them of a prescription's availability. This manual process led to a delay in pharmacist screening which impacted on discharge. Prescriptions designated for pre-packed or patient's own medicine use were not seen at all by a clinical pharmacist...
September 2016: Archives of Disease in Childhood
Jacalyn Rogers, Sonya Sebastian, William Cotton, Cheryl Pippin, Jenna Merandi
PURPOSE: The reduction of immunization errors through the use of age-specific alerts within the electronic medical record (EMR) and mandatory interactive education for prescribers is described. METHODS: A health system-wide initiative was implemented at an academic pediatric hospital to reduce the number of immunization errors. The preimplementation period (January 1-December 31, 2013) involved a baseline review of adverse drug events (ADEs) reported through a voluntary event reporting system to determine the number and types of immunization errors...
June 1, 2016: American Journal of Health-system Pharmacy: AJHP
Mollie Blazar Lebowitz, Karen L Olson, Michele Burns, Marvin B Harper, Florence Bourgeois
OBJECTIVES: Children treated with chronic medications are at risk of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) when hospitalized with an acute illness and prescribed new medications. We aimed to measure the prevalence of potential DDIs (pDDIs) among hospitalized children treated with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and to evaluate the impact of computerized physician order entry (CPOE) on pDDIs. METHODS: We analyzed a national sample of pediatric hospitalizations from 2005 to 2012 associated with administration of an AED and identified those prescribed a second medication with risk of a DDI...
May 2016: Hospital Pediatrics
Andy Fox, Sarah Pontefract, David Brown, Jane Portlock, Jamie Coleman
AIMS: The aim of the study was to develop a list of hospital based paediatric prescribing indicators that can be used to assess the impact of electronic prescribing or clinical decision support tools on paediatric prescribing errors. METHODS: Two rounds of an electronic consensus method (eDelphi) were carried out with 21 expert panellists from the UK. Panellists were asked to score each prescribing indicator for its likelihood of occurrence and severity of outcome should the error occur...
August 2016: British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
Christine L Schuler, Joshua D Courter, Shannon E Conneely, Meredith A Frost, Michael G Sherenian, Samir S Shah, Craig H Gosdin
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Short courses of antibiotics are often indicated for uncomplicated skin and soft tissue infections (uSSTIs). Our objective was to decrease duration of antibiotics prescribed in children hospitalized for uSSTIs by using quality improvement (QI) methods. METHODS: QI methods were used to decrease duration of antibiotics prescribed upon hospital discharge for uSSTIs. We sought to accomplish this goal by increasing outpatient prescriptions for short courses of therapy (≤7 days)...
February 2016: Pediatrics
G A Gellert, V Hill, K Bruner, G Maciaz, L Saucedo, L Catzoela, R Ramirez, W J Jacobs, P Nguyen, L Patel, S L Webster
OBJECTIVES: To identify and describe the most critical strategic and operational contributors to the successful implementation of clinical information technologies, as deployed within a moderate sized system of U.S. community hospitals. BACKGROUND AND SETTING: CHRISTUS Health is a multi-state system comprised of more than 350 services and 60 hospitals with over 9 000 physicians. The Santa Rosa region of CHRISTUS Health, located in greater San Antonio, Texas is comprised of three adult community hospital facilities and one Children's hospital each with bed capacities of 142-180...
2015: Applied Clinical Informatics
Margarita Ruano, Elena Villamañán, Ester Pérez, Alicia Herrero, Rodolfo Álvarez-Sala
BACKGROUND: Medication error can occur throughout the drug treatment process, with special relevance in children given the risk of adverse effects resulting from a medication error is more prevalent than in adults. The significance of medication error in children is also greater because small error that would be tolerated in adults can cause significant damage in children. Moreover, the likelihood of injury is higher than in adults. DATA SOURCES: Based on the data published, most medication errors take place in prescribing and administration stages in both populations...
February 2016: World Journal of Pediatrics: WJP
Claudia A Algaze, Matthew Wood, Natalie M Pageler, Paul J Sharek, Christopher A Longhurst, Andrew Y Shin
OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that a daily rounding checklist and a computerized order entry (CPOE) rule that limited the scheduling of complete blood cell counts and chemistry and coagulation panels to a 24-hour interval would reduce laboratory utilization and associated costs. METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of these initiatives in a pediatric cardiovascular ICU (CVICU) that included all patients with congenital or acquired heart disease admitted to the cardiovascular ICU from September 1, 2008, until April 1, 2011...
January 2016: Pediatrics
Perrine Joret-Descout, Sonia Prot-Labarthe, Françoise Brion, Julie Bataille, Jean-François Hartmann, Olivier Bourdon
BACKGROUND: Off-label or unlicensed medicine use is very common in paediatric practice, ranging from 11 to 80 %, and is one of the predisposing factors for adverse events (23-60 %). Medicine indications are the third leading reason for doctors to perform off-label prescriptions. OBJECTIVE: The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence and nature of off-label and unlicensed medicine prescriptions in children and propose methods for risk reduction and management...
December 2015: International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy
Sten Schubert, Martina Patrizia Neininger, Stefan Smers, Alfred Winter, Roberto Frontini, Astrid Bertsche, Thilo Bertsche
In tertiary care, computerized physician order entries may improve performance, cross-linking, and documentation when prescribing drugs. A clinical decision support integrated in these systems is discussed to prevent additional medication errors. For an optimal performance, the implementation into the clinical information systems is required to gain access to patient data (e. g. from laboratory). In routine care, the question rises whether a benefit of the systems can be proven in clinical studies and whether there is a difference between the systems...
June 2015: Medizinische Monatsschrift Für Pharmazeuten
Kabir Yadav, James M Chamberlain, Vicki R Lewis, Natalie Abts, Shawn Chawla, Angie Hernandez, Justin Johnson, Genevieve Tuveson, Randall S Burd
BACKGROUND: Use of electronic clinical decision support (eCDS) has been recommended to improve implementation of clinical decision rules. Many eCDS tools, however, are designed and implemented without taking into account the context in which clinical work is performed. Implementation of the pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) clinical decision rule at one Level I pediatric emergency department includes an electronic questionnaire triggered when ordering a head computed tomography using computerized physician order entry (CPOE)...
September 2015: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Mark MacKay, Collin Anderson, Sabrina Boehme, Jared Cash, Jeffery Zobell
INTRODUCTION: The Institute for Safe Medication Practices has stated that parenteral nutrition (PN) is considered a high-risk medication and has the potential of causing harm. Three organizations--American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.), American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, and National Advisory Group--have published guidelines for ordering, transcribing, compounding and administering PN. These national organizations have published data on compliance to the guidelines and the risk of errors...
April 2016: Nutrition in Clinical Practice
Usha Sethuraman, Nirupama Kannikeswaran, Kyle P Murray, Marwan A Zidan, James M Chamberlain
OBJECTIVES: Prescription errors occur frequently in pediatric emergency departments (PEDs).The effect of computerized physician order entry (CPOE) with electronic medication alert system (EMAS) on these is unknown. The objective was to compare prescription errors rates before and after introduction of CPOE with EMAS in a PED. The hypothesis was that CPOE with EMAS would significantly reduce the rate and severity of prescription errors in the PED. METHODS: A prospective comparison of a sample of outpatient, medication prescriptions 5 months before and after CPOE with EMAS implementation (7,268 before and 7,292 after) was performed...
June 2015: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Courtney E Nelson, Steven M Selbst
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2015: Pediatric Emergency Care
Felicia Berroa, Alberto Lafuente, Gracia Javaloyes, Paula Cabrera-Freitag, Juan M de la Borbolla, Rafael Moncada, Maria J Goikoetxea, Maria L Sanz, Marta Ferrer, Gabriel Gastaminza
BACKGROUND: The incidence of perioperative hypersensitivity reactions, which can be life-threatening, ranges from 1 in 20,000 to 1 in 1361. These reactions are usually classified as IgE or non-IgE mediated. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of allergic reactions during general anesthesia in our hospital, to establish the incidence of the allergic reactions for each drug used, to assess the frequency of IgE-mediated reactions in even mild reactions, and to compare the degree of agreement between anesthesiologist suspicion and allergy diagnosis...
July 2015: Anesthesia and Analgesia
Renuka Tipirneni, Ezinne G Ndukwe, Melissa Riba, HwaJung Choi, Regina Royan, Danielle Young, Marianne Udow-Phillips, Matthew M Davis
OBJECTIVES: Under the Affordable Care Act, many newly insured Americans have the challenge of establishing care with a primary care physician (PCP). We sought to examine whether health information technology (HIT) use in primary care practices was associated with anticipated capacity to accept new patients. STUDY DESIGN: Secondary analysis of a cross-sectional survey of Michigan PCPs from the specialties of pediatrics, internal medicine, and family medicine, conducted from October to December 2012...
November 2014: American Journal of Managed Care
Margarita Ruano Encinar, Elena Villamañán Bueno, Walter Rodolfo Álvarez-Sala
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2015: Archivos Argentinos de Pediatría
Ahmed I Albarrak, Eman Abdulrahman Al Rashidi, Rwaa Kamil Fatani, Shoog Ibrahim Al Ageel, Rafiuddin Mohammed
OBJECTIVES: To assess the legibility and completeness of handwritten prescriptions and compare with electronic prescription system for medication errors. DESIGN: Prospective study. SETTING: King Khalid University Hospital (KKUH), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Handwritten prescriptions were received from clinical units of Medicine Outpatient Department (MOPD), Primary Care Clinic (PCC) and Surgery Outpatient Department (SOPD) whereas electronic prescriptions were collected from the pediatric ward...
December 2014: Saudi Pharmaceutical Journal: SPJ: the Official Publication of the Saudi Pharmaceutical Society
Alice Mary Burridge, David Terry, Keith Wilson
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to provide an initial insight into current UK paediatric prescribing practice. METHODS: In 2012 focus groups were conducted at Birmingham Children's Hospital (UK specialist hospital) with both medical and non-medical prescribers and analysed using thematic analysis. KEY FINDINGS: Both sets of prescribers used a wide range of resources to support their prescribing decisions. Dosing information was most commonly checked, and a lack of specialist paediatric information was reported in existing resources...
June 2015: International Journal of Pharmacy Practice
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