Read by QxMD icon Read

urticaria and angioedema

Sharon Seth, David A Khan
BACKGROUND: Patients who have failed traditional treatment of chronic urticaria may require trials of alternative medications. Safety profiles, continuous laboratory monitoring, and physician comfort are often barriers to treatment. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the safety of alternative agents used in chronic urticaria. METHODS: A retrospective chart review of electronic medical records from a single-center allergy and immunology clinic in a major academic hospital was conducted...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology in Practice
G Cortellini, A Romano, A Santucci, A Barbaud, S Bavbek, D Bignardi, M Blanca, P Bonadonna, M T Costantino, J J Laguna, C Lombardo, L Losappio, J Makowska, A Nakonechna, O Quercia, E A Pastorello, V Patella, I Terreehorst, S Testi, J R Cernadas, J Dionicio Elera, D Lippolis, S Voltolini, D Grosseto
BACKGROUND: Hypersensitivity to acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) constitutes a serious problem for subjects with coronary artery disease. In such subjects, physicians have to choose the more appropriate procedure between challenge and desensitization. As the literature on this issue is sparse, the present study aims to establish in these subjects clinical criteria for eligibility for an ASA challenge and/or desensitization. METHODS: Collection and analysis of data on ASA challenges and desensitizations from 10 allergy centers, as well as consensus among the related physicians and an expert panel...
October 12, 2016: Allergy
Mario Sánchez-Borges, Fernan Caballero-Fonseca, Arnaldo Capriles-Hulett, Luis González-Aveledo
After beta lactam antibiotics, hypersensitivity reactions to nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs are the second cause of hypersensitivity to drugs. Acute manifestations affect the respiratory tract (aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease), the skin (urticaria and angioedema), or are generalized (anaphylaxis). Correct diagnosis and treatment in order to prevent unnecessary morbidity and the potential risk of death from these severe reactions, and to provide proper medical advice on future drug use frequently requires the participation of allergology specialists familiar with these clinical conditions...
January 5, 2010: Pharmaceuticals
Katherine N Cahill, Tanya M Laidlaw
The acute clinical symptoms that develop following the oral ingestion of aspirin, or any other inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-1, are well established in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease: nasal congestion, rhinorrhea, and bronchospasm. Less commonly, gastrointestinal distress, rash, angioedema, or urticaria also develops. However, the pathobiology that drives these clinical reactions is poorly understood. Use of an intranasal aspirin challenge protocol or administration of premedications inhibiting the leukotriene pathway decreases the severity of clinical reaction, which suggests the involvement of both local effector cells and cysteinyl leukotrienes in the pathogenesis of aspirin-induced reactions...
November 2016: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America
Francesco Gaeta, Maria J Torres, Rocco Luigi Valluzzi, Cristiano Caruso, Cristobalina Mayorga, Antonino Romano
Hypersensitivity reactions to β-lactam antibiotics are commonly reported. They can be classified as immediate or non-immediate according to the time interval between the last drug administration and their onset. Immediate reactions occur within one hour after the last drug administration and are manifested clinically by urticaria and/or angioedema, rhinitis, bronchospasm, and anaphylactic shock; they may be mediated by specific IgE-antibodies. Non-immediate reactions occur more than one hour after the last drug administration...
October 4, 2016: Current Pharmaceutical Design
Kanokvalai Kulthanan, Papapit Tuchinda, Leena Chularojanamontri, Pattriya Chanyachailert, Wiwat Korkij, Amornsri Chunharas, Siriwan Wananukul, Wanida Limpongsanurak, Suwat Benjaponpitak, Wanee Wisuthsarewong, Kobkul Aunhachoke, Vesarat Wessagowit, Pantipa Chatchatee, Penpun Wattanakrai, Orathai Jirapongsananuruk, Jettanong Klaewsongkram, Nopadon Noppakun, Pakit Vichyanond, Puan Suthipinittharm, Kiat Ruxrungtham, Srisupalak Singalavanija, Jarungchit Ngamphaiboon
Urticaria is a common skin condition that can compromise quality of life and may affect individual performance at work or school. Remission is common in majority of patients with acute spontaneous urticaria (ASU); however, in chronic cases, less than 50% had remission. Angioedema either alone or with urticaria is associated with a much lower remission rate. Proper investigation and treatment is thus required. This guideline, a joint development of the Dermatological Society of Thailand, the Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology Association of Thailand and the Pediatric Dermatological Society of Thailand, is graded and recommended based on published evidence and expert opinion...
September 2016: Asian Pacific Journal of Allergy and Immunology
Ángela Martín-Serrano, Nekane Barbero, José A Agundez, Yolanda Vida, Ezequiel Pérez-Inestrosa, María I Montañez
Allergic drug reactions are currently a major public health problem affecting patient health and increasing healthcare costs. They are caused by interactions between a drug and the human immune system and result in symptoms ranging from urticaria or angioedema to those more serious such as anaphylaxis or anaphylactic shock. The most commonly accepted mechanism for immunological activation is based on the hapten hypothesis. Drugs are low molecular weight substances that cannot cause an immune response on their own...
September 21, 2016: Current Pharmaceutical Design
Daniel Amaya, Andrés Sánchez, Jorge Sánchez
Inducible urticaria is a heterogeneous group of skin disorders characterized by the appearance of wheals, pruritus and/or angioedema, sometimes accompanied by systemic symptoms caused by innocuous stimuli (cold, heat, pressure, etc.). This group of disorders compromises people's quality of life and most of the literature in this regard comes from case reports and case series since its epidemiology has been poorly studied and some cases are very rare. The aim of this review is to show an up-to-date overview of the available literature for various types of inducible urticarias, always beginning with an illustrative case and then describing their pathophysiological mechanisms, clinical manifestations, and treatment...
2016: Biomédica: Revista del Instituto Nacional de Salud
Korbkarn Pongpairoj, Iris Ale, Klaus Ejner Andersen, Magnus Bruze, Thomas L Diepgen, Peter U Elsner, Chee Leok Goh, An Goossens, Hemangi Jerajani, Jean Marie Lachapelle, Jun Young Lee, Howard I Maibach, Kayoko Matsunaga, Rosemary Nixon, Pailin Puangpet, Denis Sasseville, Supitchaya Thaiwat, John P McFadden
The International Contact Dermatitis Research Group proposes a classification for the clinical presentation of contact allergy. The classification is based primarily on the mode of clinical presentation. The categories are direct exposure/contact dermatitis, mimicking or exacerbation of preexisting eczema, multifactorial dermatitis including allergic contact dermatitis, by proxy, mimicking angioedema, airborne contact dermatitis, photo-induced contact dermatitis, systemic contact dermatitis, noneczematous contact dermatitis, contact urticaria, protein contact dermatitis, respiratory/mucosal symptoms, oral contact dermatitis, erythroderma/exfoliative dermatitis, minor forms of presentation, and extracutaneous manifestations...
September 2016: Dermatitis
Elliot Haybarger, Andrew S Young, Joseph A Giovannitti
The incidence of anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions has been reported to vary between 1 : 3500 and 1 : 20,000 cases with a mortality rate ranging from 3 to 9%. Clinical signs present as skin rash, urticaria, angioedema, bronchospasm, tachycardia, bradycardia, and hypotension. Rapid identification and treatment are crucial to overall patient prognosis, as delayed intervention is associated with increased mortality. Diagnosis may be confirmed with clinical presentation, serum tryptase levels, and skin test results...
2016: Anesthesia Progress
Lyda Cuervo-Pardo, Alexei Gonzalez-Estrada, David M Lang
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Physical urticaria/angioedema syndromes (PUAs) are commonly encountered. They are identified by a history of physical factors provoking cutaneous symptoms, and confirmed by provocation testing. Recent guidelines have recommended use of challenge procedures for diagnosis; however, their positive/negative likelihood ratios have not been established. RECENT FINDINGS: We conducted a systematic review to determine the diagnostic utility of recommended office procedures for three common PUAs: dermatographia (DERMATO), cholinergic urticaria (CHOL), and delayed pressure urticaria/angioedema (DPUA)...
October 2016: Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology
I Schwarz, D Bokanovic, W Aberer
The oral allergy syndrome is one of the most common form of food allergy and manifests as contact urticaria of the oral mucosa after consumption of cross reacting foods. Whereas allergic contact stomatitis often occurs due to dental materials, allergic contact cheilitis is usually a reaction due to topical therapeutics like herpes ointments or lip care products. As late type reactions are more frequent than immediate type reactions in the anogenital mucosa, contact dermatitis in this area should be identified via epicutaneous testing...
October 2016: Der Hautarzt; Zeitschrift Für Dermatologie, Venerologie, und Verwandte Gebiete
Gustavo Deza, Ana M Giménez-Arnau
Urticaria is a common skin disorder defined by the occurrence of itchy and even painful wheals, angioedema, or both. The lifetime prevalence for its acute and chronic form is 20 and 1%, respectively. The patients' quality of life is impaired because of itch, disfigurement, and high associated comorbidity. To understand the pathophysiology of the wheal in order to ensure a correct therapeutic approach is critical. Mast cells are the primary effector cells in urticaria, which produce and secrete a variety of inflammatory mediators, mainly histamine...
2016: Current Problems in Dermatology
Lahari Rampur, Sunit P Jariwala, Golda Hudes, David L Rosenstreich, Gabriele de Vos
BACKGROUND: The immunomodulatory effects of helminths have been well described. However, there is a relative lack of literature regarding the link between parasites and allergic diseases. A number of patients with allergic symptoms have positive serologic test results for Strongyloides stercoralis. OBJECTIVE: To identify patients with allergy-type symptoms and coexisting Strongyloides infection and to analyze the effect of Strongyloides eradication therapy with ivermectin on these symptoms...
October 2016: Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology
Van Nguyen, Lauren Simon, Ecler Jaqua
The purpose of this article is to review the current available material pertaining to atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, urticaria, and angioedema. This article focuses on each disease process's clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management. Although atopic dermatitis and contact dermatitis are similar, their development is different and can affect a patient's quality of life. Urticaria and angioedema are also similar, but the differentiation of the two processes is crucial in that they have significant morbidity and mortality, each with a different prognosis...
September 2016: Primary Care
Diana Pérez-Alzate, Natalia Blanca-López, Inmaculada Doña, José A Agúndez, Elena García-Martín, José A Cornejo-García, James R Perkins, Miguel Blanca, Gabriela Canto
In subjects with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)- exacerbated respiratory disease (NERD) symptoms are triggered by acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) and other strong COX-1 inhibitors, and in some cases by weak COX-1 or by selective COX-2 inhibitors. The mechanism involved is related to prostaglandin pathway inhibition and leukotriene release. Subjects who react to a single NSAID and tolerate others are considered selective responders, and often present urticaria and/or angioedema and anaphylaxis (SNIUAA)...
2016: Frontiers in Pharmacology
M Cicardi, C Suffritti, F Perego, S Caccia
Angioedema is defined as local, noninflammatory, self-limiting edema that is circumscribed owing to increased leakage of plasma from the capillaries located in the deep layers of the skin and the mucosae. Two mediators, histamine and bradykinin, account for most cases of angioedema. Angioedema can occur with wheals as a manifestation of urticaria, and this form is frequently allergic. In the present review, we discuss nonallergic angioedema without wheals, which can be divided into 3 acquired and 4 hereditary forms...
2016: Journal of Investigational Allergology & Clinical Immunology
Ayal Hassidim, Ilan Merdler, Odelia Chorin, Rona Merdler-Rabinowicz, Ilan Dallal, Maxim Perlman, Ehud Chorin
BACKGROUND: Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute, systemic vasculitis in children, with an etiology that is not completely understood. It is assumed that the development of KD is mediated by an immunologic response. Several reports from East Asia have found a higher prevalence of atopic diseases among patients with KD, but a large-scale study of a non-Asian population regarding this correlation is still lacking. The purpose of this article was to achieve this goal. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional, large-scale study to estimate the correlation of KD with allergic diseases...
2016: International Archives of Allergy and Immunology
James L Zazzali, Allen Kaplan, Marcus Maurer, Karina Raimundo, Benjamin Trzaskoma, Paul G Solari, Evgeniya Antonova, Meryl Mendelson, Karin E Rosén
BACKGROUND: Angioedema, present in some patients with chronic idiopathic/spontaneous urticaria (CIU/CSU), may have a negative effect on patient quality of life. OBJECTIVE: To describe patient-reported angioedema and its management in the pivotal omalizumab studies (ASTERIA I, ASTERIA II, GLACIAL). METHODS: Enrolled patients with CIU/CSU remained symptomatic despite treatment with histamine1 (H1)-antihistamines at licensed doses (ASTERIA I, ASTERIA II) or H1-antihistamines at up to 4 times the approved dose plus H2-antihistamines and/or a leukotriene receptor antagonist (GLACIAL)...
July 13, 2016: Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology
Gurumoorthy Rajesh, Subramaniam Keerthi, Kaliaperumal Karthikeyan, Murugan Venkatesan
OBJECTIVE: Treatment of chronic urticaria (CU) can be difficult in many patients. Achieving long-term remission and reducing the requirement of antihistamines are vital in CU. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of injection histaglobulin, a complex of histamine and human immunoglobulin, in producing relief in patients with CU. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-one patients with CU were enrolled into this prospective clinical study. Patients were administered 1 ml of injection histaglobulin subcutaneous for 8 consecutive weeks...
May 2016: Indian Journal of Pharmacology
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"