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macrophage in immune response

Adam C Labonte, Sun-Sang J Sung, Lucas T Jennelle, Aditya P Dandekar, Young S Hahn
: The liver maintains an immunologically tolerant environment as a result of continuous exposure to food and bacterial constituents from the digestive tract. Hepatotropic pathogens can take advantage of this niche and establish lifelong chronic infections causing hepatic fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Macrophages (Mϕ) play a critical role in regulation of immune responses to hepatic infection and regeneration of tissue. However, the factors crucial for Mϕ in limiting hepatic inflammation or resolving liver damage have not been fully understood...
October 22, 2016: Hepatology: Official Journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases
Pradipta Ranjan Rauta, Sarbani Ashe, Debasis Nayak, Bismita Nayak
Virulence-related outer membrane proteins (Omps) are expressed in bacteria (Gram-negative) such as V. cholerae and are vital to bacterial invasion in to eukaryotic cell and survival within macrophages that could be best candidate for development of vaccine against V. cholerae. Applying in silico approaches, the 3-D model of the Omp was developed using Swiss model server and validated byProSA and Procheck web server. The continuous stretch of amino acid sequences 26mer: RTRSNSGLLTWGDKQTITLEYGDPAL and 31mer: FFAGGDNNLRGYGYKSISPQDASGALTGAKY having B-cell binding sites were selected from sequence alignment after B cell epitopes prediction by BCPred and AAP prediction modules of BCPreds...
October 12, 2016: Computational Biology and Chemistry
Yi Wang, Yao-Xin Lin, Sheng-Lin Qiao, Hong-Wei An, Yang Ma, Zeng-Ying Qiao, R P Yeshan J Rajapaksha, Hao Wang
Immunotherapy has shown a promising effect for a variety of cancers. However, the immune treatment efficiency of solid tumor is limited due to barely infiltration of immune cells in solid tumor. Researchers realized conversion of tumor supportive macrophages to tumor against ones was an effective method to induce the functional reverse of macrophage and contributed to the subsequent antitumor response. The current challenge in the field is that while making use of cytokines usually coupled with poor-distribution and systemic side effects...
October 4, 2016: Biomaterials
Yohann Nédélec, Joaquín Sanz, Golshid Baharian, Zachary A Szpiech, Alain Pacis, Anne Dumaine, Jean-Christophe Grenier, Andrew Freiman, Aaron J Sams, Steven Hebert, Ariane Pagé Sabourin, Francesca Luca, Ran Blekhman, Ryan D Hernandez, Roger Pique-Regi, Jenny Tung, Vania Yotova, Luis B Barreiro
Individuals from different populations vary considerably in their susceptibility to immune-related diseases. To understand how genetic variation and natural selection contribute to these differences, we tested for the effects of African versus European ancestry on the transcriptional response of primary macrophages to live bacterial pathogens. A total of 9.3% of macrophage-expressed genes show ancestry-associated differences in the gene regulatory response to infection, and African ancestry specifically predicts a stronger inflammatory response and reduced intracellular bacterial growth...
October 20, 2016: Cell
Wei Huang, Jiyuan Wu, Huiqin Yang, Yin Xiong, Rui Jiang, Tianpen Cui, Duyun Ye
Abnormal features of the systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-derived neutrophils, promoted aberrant immune response, have inspired new studies of the induction of autoimmunity and the development of organ damage in SLE. In this study, we explore the effect of milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 (MFG-E8) on the aberrant nitrification features in pristane-induced lupus. SLE patients and mice with pristane-induced lupus develop autoantibodies associated with MFG-E8 overproduction. However, the deletion of MFG-E8 leads to uncontrolled early pulmonary and peritoneal inflammation and tissue damage in mice with pristane-induced lupus...
October 21, 2016: Cell Death and Differentiation
Kevin Vivot, Malika A Benahmed, Elodie Seyfritz, William Bietiger, Karim Elbayed, Elisa Ruhland, Allan Langlois, Elisa Maillard, Michel Pinget, Nathalie Jeandidier, Jean-Pierre Gies, Izzie-Jacques Namer, Séverine Sigrist, Nathalie Reix
Intrahepatic transplantation of islets requires a lot of islets because more than 50% of the graft is lost during the 24 hours following transplantation. We analyzed, in a rat model, early post-transplantation inflammation using systemic inflammatory markers, or directly in islet-transplanted livers by immunohistochemistry. (1)H HRMAS NMR was employed to investigate metabolic responses associated with the transplantation. Inflammatory markers (Interleukin-6, α2-macroglobulin) are not suitable to follow islet reactions as they are not islet specific...
2016: International Journal of Biological Sciences
Guoying Deng, Fei Zhang, Shufeng Yang, Jian Kang, Shanshan Sha, Yufang Ma
Tuberculosis remains a global major problem. The immune responses of host against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) are complicated. M. tuberculosis lives mainly within host cells, usually macrophages which constitute the first line of host defense. Mycobacterial proteins, especially cell wall-associated proteins, interact with macrophages of host to regulate the functions and cytokine production. Recent studies indicate that glycoproteins are involved in this process. Here, we investigated the function of Rv0431, a cell wall-associated protein in the M...
October 18, 2016: Microbial Pathogenesis
Menaga Ilangkovan, Ibrahim Jantan, Syed Nasir Abbas Bukhari
BACKGROUND: Phyllanthin found in many Phyllanthus species has various biochemical and pharmacological properties especially on its hepatoprotective effects. However, its effect on the immune system has not been well documented. PURPOSE: In the present study, phyllanthin isolated from Phyllanthus amarus was investigated for its immunosuppressive effects on various cellular and humoral immune responses in Balb/C mice. METHODS: Male mice were treated daily at 20, 40 and 100mg/kg of phyllanthin for 14 days by oral gavage...
November 15, 2016: Phytomedicine: International Journal of Phytotherapy and Phytopharmacology
Wang-Dong Zhang, Wen-Hui Wang, Shu-Xian Li, Shuai Jia, Xue-Feng Zhang, Ting-Ting Cao
BACKGROUND: The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) plays a crucial role in transporting IgG and associated antigens across polarized epithelial barriers in mucosal immunity. However, it was not clear that FcRn expression in aggregated lymphoid nodules area (ALNA) in abomasum, a unique and important mucosal immune structure discovered only in Bactrian camels. In the present study, 27 Alashan Bactrian camels were divided into the following five age groups: fetus (10-13 months of gestation), young (1-2 years), pubertal (3-5 years), middle-aged (6-16 years) and old (17-20 years)...
October 20, 2016: BMC Veterinary Research
Jin Kyung Kim, Hye-Mi Lee, Ki-Sun Park, Dong-Min Shin, Tae Sung Kim, Yi Sak Kim, Hyun-Woo Suh, Soo Yeon Kim, In Soo Kim, Jin-Man Kim, Ji-Woong Son, Kyung Mok Sohn, Sung Soo Jung, Chaeuk Chung, Sang-Bae Han, Chul-Su Yang, Eun-Kyeong Jo
Autophagy is an important antimicrobial effector process that defends against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the human pathogen causing tuberculosis (TB). MicroRNAs (miRNAs), endogenous noncoding RNAs, are involved in various biological functions and act as post-transcriptional regulators to target mRNAs. The process by which miRNAs affect antibacterial autophagy and host defense mechanisms against Mtb infections in human monocytes and macrophages is largely uncharacterized. In this study, we show that Mtb significantly induces the expression of MIR144*/hsa-miR-144-5p, which targets the 3'-untranslated region of DRAM2 (DNA damage regulated autophagy modulator 2) in human monocytes and macrophages...
October 20, 2016: Autophagy
Kun Taek Park, Mahmoud M ElNaggar, Gaber S Abdellrazeq, John P Bannantine, Victoria Mack, Lindsay M Fry, William C Davis
Phylogenic comparisons of the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) of humans and mice demonstrate phenotypic divergence of dendritic cell (DC) subsets that play similar roles in innate and adaptive immunity. Although differing in phenotype, DC can be classified into four groups according to ontogeny and function: conventional DC (cDC1 and cDC2), plasmacytoid DC (pDC), and monocyte derived DC (MoDC). DC of Artiodactyla (pigs and ruminants) can also be sub-classified using this system, allowing direct functional and phenotypic comparison of MoDC and other DC subsets trafficking in blood (bDC)...
2016: PloS One
Gina Leisching, Ray-Dean Pietersen, Carel van Heerden, Paul van Helden, Ian Wiid, Bienyameen Baker
The distinguishing factors that characterize the host response to infection with virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) are largely confounding. We present an infection study with two genetically closely related M.tb strains that have vastly different pathogenic characteristics. The early host response to infection with these detergent-free cultured strains was analysed through RNAseq in an attempt to provide information on the subtleties which may ultimately contribute to the virulent phenotype. Murine bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs) were infected with either a hyper- (R5527) or hypovirulent (R1507) Beijing M...
October 20, 2016: Virulence
Daniel Zysset, Benjamin Weber, Silvia Rihs, Jennifer Brasseit, Stefan Freigang, Carsten Riether, Yara Banz, Adelheid Cerwenka, Cedric Simillion, Pedro Marques-Vidal, Adrian F Ochsenbein, Leslie Saurer, Christoph Mueller
Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) is a potent amplifier of pro-inflammatory innate immune responses, but its significance in non-infectious diseases remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that TREM-1 promotes cardiovascular disease by exacerbating atherosclerosis. TREM-1 is expressed in advanced human atheromas and is highly upregulated under dyslipidemic conditions on circulating and on lesion-infiltrating myeloid cells in the Apoe(-/-) mouse model. TREM-1 strongly contributes to high-fat, high-cholesterol diet (HFCD)-induced monocytosis and synergizes with HFCD serum-derived factors to promote pro-inflammatory cytokine responses and foam cell formation of human monocyte/macrophages...
October 20, 2016: Nature Communications
Akimune Kaga, Hiroshi Watanabe, Hiroki Miyabayashi, Takaya Metoki, Setsuko Kitaoka, Satoru Kumaki
Neonatal toxic shock syndrome-like exanthematous disease (NTED) is a newly recognized neonatal infectious disease, caused by the superantigen toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1). TSST-1 is mainly produced by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and the immune responses to TSST-1 are known to cause toxic shock syndrome, a life-threatening infectious disease. The clinical symptoms of NTED are skin rash, fever, and thrombocytopenia, but severe thrombocytopenia is rare in term infants with NTED. Although the cause of NTED is the same as that of toxic shock syndrome, the clinical symptoms of NTED are milder than toxic shock syndrome...
2016: Tohoku Journal of Experimental Medicine
Birong Li, Babitha Haridas, Ashley R Jackson, Hanna Cortado, Nicholas Mayne, Rebecca Kohnken, Brad Bolon, Kirk M McHugh, Andrew L Schwaderer, John D Spencer, Christina B Ching, David S Hains, Sheryl S Justice, Santiago Partida-Sanchez, Brian Becknell
Acquired renal scarring occurs in a subset of patients following febrile urinary tract infections and is associated with hypertension, proteinuria, and chronic kidney disease. Limited knowledge of histopathology, immune cell recruitment and gene expression changes during pyelonephritis restricts the development of therapies to limit renal scarring. Here, we address this knowledge gap using immunocompetent mice with vesicoureteral reflux. Transurethral inoculation of uropathogenic Escherichia coli in C3H/HeOuJ mice leads to renal mucosal injury, tubulointerstitial nephritis, and cortical fibrosis...
October 19, 2016: American Journal of Physiology. Renal Physiology
Lydia F Edey, Kieran P O'Dea, Bronwen R Herbert, Renyi Hua, Simon N Waddington, David A MacIntyre, Philip R Bennett, Masao Takata, Mark R Johnson
Inflammation plays a key role in human term and preterm labor (PTL). Intrauterine LPS has been widely used to model inflammation induced complications of pregnancy including PTL. It has been shown to induce an intense myometrial inflammatory cell infiltration, but the role of LPS-induced inflammatory cell activation in labor onset and fetal demise is unclear. We investigated this using a mouse model of PTL, where an intrauterine injection of 10 µg of LPS (serotype 0111:B4) was given at E16 of CD1 mouse pregnancy...
October 19, 2016: Biology of Reproduction
Daniel Hachim, Samuel T LoPresti, Cecelia C Yates, Bryan N Brown
The present study tests the hypothesis that transient, early-stage shifts in macrophage polarization at the tissue-implant interface from a pro-inflammatory (M1) to an anti-inflammatory/regulatory (M2) phenotype mitigates the host inflammatory reaction against a non-degradable polypropylene mesh material and improves implant integration downstream. To address this hypothesis, a nanometer-thickness coating capable of releasing IL-4 (an M2 polarizing cytokine) from an implant surface at early stages of the host response has been developed...
October 11, 2016: Biomaterials
M L V Azevedo, N B Bonan, G Dias, F Brehm, T M Steiner, W M Souza, A E M Stinghen, F C Barreto, Selene Elifio-Esposito, R Pecoits-Filho, A N Moreno-Amaral
Immune system dysfunction is a common condition in chronic kidney disease (CKD). The present study investigated the effect of p-Cresyl sulfate (pCS) on human cell line U937 monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) activity. MDM (1×10(6) cells/mL) were incubated with pCS (10, 25, or 50μg/mL), with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 25ng/mL) and then evaluated NO production, phagocytosis and antigen-presenting molecules expression (HLA-ABC, HLA-DR, CD80 and CD86). All analyses were performed by flow cytometry. All pCS concentrations were able to increase NO production (49±12...
October 16, 2016: Toxicology Letters
Mark R Cronan, Rebecca W Beerman, Allison F Rosenberg, Joseph W Saelens, Matthew G Johnson, Stefan H Oehlers, Dana M Sisk, Kristen L Jurcic Smith, Neil A Medvitz, Sara E Miller, Le A Trinh, Scott E Fraser, John F Madden, Joanne Turner, Jason E Stout, Sunhee Lee, David M Tobin
Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in humans triggers formation of granulomas, which are tightly organized immune cell aggregates that are the central structure of tuberculosis. Infected and uninfected macrophages interdigitate, assuming an altered, flattened appearance. Although pathologists have described these changes for over a century, the molecular and cellular programs underlying this transition are unclear. Here, using the zebrafish-Mycobacterium marinum model, we found that mycobacterial granuloma formation is accompanied by macrophage induction of canonical epithelial molecules and structures...
October 18, 2016: Immunity
Prabesh Bhattarai, Alvin Kuriakose Thomas, Mehmet Ilyas Cosacak, Christos Papadimitriou, Violeta Mashkaryan, Cynthia Froc, Susanne Reinhardt, Thomas Kurth, Andreas Dahl, Yixin Zhang, Caghan Kizil
Human brains are prone to neurodegeneration, given that endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) fail to support neurogenesis. To investigate the molecular programs potentially mediating neurodegeneration-induced NSPC plasticity in regenerating organisms, we generated an Amyloid-β42 (Aβ42)-dependent neurotoxic model in adult zebrafish brain through cerebroventricular microinjection of cell-penetrating Aβ42 derivatives. Aβ42 deposits in neurons and causes phenotypes reminiscent of amyloid pathophysiology: apoptosis, microglial activation, synaptic degeneration, and learning deficits...
October 18, 2016: Cell Reports
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