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Sprint -athlete

Joshua H F Cooper, Blake E G Collins, David R Adams, Robert A Robergs, Cheyne E Donges
Purpose. Limited data exists for the effects of sprint-interval training (SIT) and endurance training (ET) on total body composition, abdominal visceral adipose tissue, and plasma inflammation. Moreover, whether "active" or "passive" recovery in SIT provides a differential effect on these measures remains uncertain. Methods. Sedentary middle-aged men (n = 62; 49.5 ± 5.8 y; 29.7 ± 3.7 kg·m(2)) underwent abdominal computed tomography, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, venepuncture, and exercise testing before and after the interventions, which included the following: 12 wks 3 d·wk(-1) ET (n = 15; 50-60 min cycling; 80% HRmax), SIT (4-10 × 30 s sprint efforts) with passive (P-SIT; n = 15) or active recovery (A-SIT; n = 15); or nonexercise control condition (CON; n = 14)...
2016: Journal of Obesity
Christopher Thompson, Anni Vanhatalo, Harry Jell, Jonathan Fulford, James Carter, Lara Nyman, Stephen J Bailey, Andrew M Jones
: The influence of dietary nitrate (NO3(-)) supplementation on indices of maximal sprint and intermittent exercise performance is unclear. PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of NO3(-) supplementation on sprint running performance, and cognitive function and exercise performance during the sport-specific Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery level 1 test (IR1). METHODS: In a double-blind, randomised, crossover study, 36 male team-sport players received NO3(-)-rich (BR; 70 mL·day(-1); 6...
October 21, 2016: Nitric Oxide: Biology and Chemistry
Guido Grassi, Fosca Quarti-Trevano, Anna Casati, Raffaella Dell'Oro
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Detection of elevated blood pressure values in elderly patients represents a common clinical condition associated with an increased cardiovascular risk. This has been shown to be the case in both systodiastolic and isolated systolic hypertension as well. However, despite the evidence of the benefits of the blood pressure lowering intervention in terms of reduction of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, at least two issues related to antihypertensive drug treatment in aged individuals are still undefined: (1) the blood pressure threshold at which antihypertensive drug should be initiated and (2) the blood pressure goals of the therapeutic intervention...
December 2016: Current Atherosclerosis Reports
Ikram Bezrati, Raouf Hammami, Mohamed Kacem Ben Fradj, Domenico Martone, Johnny Padulo, Moncef Feki, Anis Chaouachi, Naziha Kaabachi
Vitamin D is thought to regulate skeletal muscle function and boost physical performance. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between vitamin D and physical performance in physically active children. This cross-sectional study included 125 children who practice football as a leisure activity. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) was assessed using a chemiluminescence immunoassay method. Vitamin D inadequacy was defined as 25-OHD < 20 ng/mL. Physical performance testing included measurements of muscle strength (maximal isometric contraction), jumping ability (vertical jump, standing broad jump, triple hop test), linear sprint (10 m and 20 m), and agility (9 × 4-m shuttle run)...
July 13, 2016: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Physiologie Appliquée, Nutrition et Métabolisme
Sarah C Bath, Victor J M Pop, Victoria L Furmidge-Owen, Maarten Broeren, Margaret P Rayman
Background Though iodine deficiency in pregnancy is a matter of public-health concern, a functional measure of iodine status is lacking. The thyroid-specific protein, thyroglobulin (Tg), which reflects thyroid size, has shown promise as a functional measure in studies of children and adults, but data in pregnancy are sparse. In a cohort of mildly-to-moderately iodine-deficient pregnant women, we aimed to explore whether serum Tg is a sensitive functional biomarker of iodine status and to examine longitudinal change in Tg with gestational age...
October 20, 2016: Thyroid: Official Journal of the American Thyroid Association
Anne-Laure Faucon, Anne-Marie Madjalian, Guillaume Bobrie, Laurence Amar, Michel Azizi
Blood pressure is a major determinant of cardiovascular risk. Blood pressure target to reach with antihypertensive therapy, and the population to whom it should apply, remain debatted. Blood pressure goals established by scientific societies may be revised after the publication of the US multicenter SPRINT study results (Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial) obtained in 2015. Analysis of the generalizability of the SPRINT results shows that they may not be directly applied to the french population which is at lower risk than the US population and would have major medical and economic implications...
October 2016: Médecine Sciences: M/S
Diego B Souza, Juan Del Coso, Juliano Casonatto, Marcos D Polito
PURPOSE: Caffeine-containing energy drinks (EDs) are currently used as ergogenic aids to improve physical performance in a wide variety of sport disciplines. However, the outcomes of previous investigations on this topic are inconclusive due to methodological differences, especially, in the dosage of the active ingredients and the test used to assess performance. METHODS: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies to evaluate the effects of acute ED intake on physical performance...
October 18, 2016: European Journal of Nutrition
Satoshi Hoshide, Yuichiro Yano, Hajime Haimoto, Kayo Yamagiwa, Kiyoshi Uchiba, Shoichiro Nagasaka, Yoshio Matsui, Akira Nakamura, Motoki Fukutomi, Kazuo Eguchi, Joji Ishikawa, Kazuomi Kario
OBJECTIVE: The SPRINT (Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial) recently demonstrated that strict blood pressure (BP) control resulted in a lower cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk compared to standard BP control, however, this association was not observed regarding the incidence of stroke. Previous studies revealed that the contribution of BP as a risk factor was higher for stroke incidence than for any other CVD, especially in Asian populations. It is thus not clear whether the results of the SPRINT can be generalized to all Asian populations...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Jongha Park
Cardiovascular (CV) risk assessment is not easy in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Age, male sex, race, family history of CV disease, smoking status and diabetes should be considered as CV risk factors as the general population. It is also accepted that hypertension (HTN) is associated with the greater risk of CV complications in this population. However, there are some concerns in this issue.First, supporting evidence for specific blood pressure (BP) targets in CKD is scarce. Many observational studies reported a J-shaped association between BP level and CV mortality unlike a linear association in the general population...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Sadayoshi Ito
SPRINT is one of the landmark studies, demonstrating that extensive blood pressure (BP) control (BP < 120 mmHg) is superior to standard control (BP < 140 mmHg) in preventing cardiovascular event (CVE). Subjects recruited were older than 50 years without diabetes and had increased risk of CVE. Heart failure, death from cardiovascular cause and death from any cause were major endpoints reduced by extensive BP control. In subgroup analysis, whole spectrum of patients were benefitted. Contrary to several previous studies, this study provides strong evidence for the beneficial effect of extensive BP reduction...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Clive Rosendorff
Many guidelines for the management of hypertension have recommended that the goal of antihypertensive treatment in the elderly (usually specified as 80 years or above) should be less than 150/90 mmHg. SPRINT included subjects 50 years or above, and a substantial proportion of subjects 75 years and older. These are individuals at high risk for adverse cardiovascular events because of high prevalence of hypertension and atherosclerotic disease. The less stringent BP goals have been based on a percieved danger of lowering BP to levels that threaten vital organ pefusion (myocardium, brain, kidney)...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Daniel W Jones
Hypertension and Chronic Kidney Disease are both common. The vast majority of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have hypertension. Hypertension can be both a cause and a result of CKD. Many patients with CKD, both diabetic and non-diabetic have overt proteinuria (>300 mg/day). Patients with proteinuria are at higher risk for progression of kidney disease and for atherosclerosis. Because patients with CKD are often excluded from hypertension trials with hard outcomes, there has been until recently less data than ideal to consider in making decisions...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Paul Whelton
BACKGROUND: Choice of the optimal target for blood pressure (BP) reduction during treatment of patients with hypertension, including those with underlying co-morbid conditions, is an important challenge in clinical practice. The Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) was designed to provide guidance in selection of a Systolic BP target during treatment of hypertension. METHODS: Adults ≥50 years old with hypertension and at least one additional risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), but excluding persons with diabetes mellitus, prior stroke, or advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) were randomly assigned to intensive therapy (intensive), targeting a systolic BP (SBP) <120 mmHg, or standard therapy (standard), targeting a SBP <140 mmHg...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Massimo Salvetti, Anna Paini, Claudia Agabiti Rosei, Deborah Stassaldi, Fabio Bertacchini, Giulia Rubagotti, Giulia Maruelli, Laura Verzeri, Carlotta Donini, Maria Lorenza Muiesan, Enrico Agabiti Rosei
OBJECTIVE: The recent results of the SPRINT study suggest that "intensive" reduction of systolic blood pressure (BP) (to less than 120 mmHg) might provide greater cardiovascular protection as compared to less intensive (< 140 mmHg) reduction of BP, at least in some subsets of patients. Only few studies, have investigated the possible effect of tight blood pressure control on indices of left ventricular hypertrophy, and have been mainly based on electrocardiography. Aim of our study was to evaluate cardiac organ damage according to "on treatment" blood pressure values in a large cohort of hypertensive patients undergoing echocardiography (2D, M-mode with conventional and tissue Doppler analysis)at the echo-lab of an ESH Excellence Centre in Italy...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
David John Webb
Treatment-resistant hypertension (TRH) is defined as the failure to achieve an office BP target of <140/90 mmHg (<130/80 mmHg in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) or diabetes) in patients with hypertension (HT), despite adherence to at least 3 antihypertensive medications at optimal tolerated doses, ideally including a diuretic (Calhoun et al., Circulation 2008). TRH identifies patients with hard-to-treat HT, who might benefit from specialist investigation and treatment. Although some studies put the prevalence of TRH as >10%, these levels may be inflated by white-coat hypertension and poor adherence...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Guido Grassi
The Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT), sponsored by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute in the USA, allocated 9361 hypertensive patients (mean age 68 years) to two systolic blood pressure treatment targets (either < 120mmHg or < 140mmHg). Although SPRINT intended to enrol hypertensive patients at high cardiovascular risk, it specifically excluded patients with diabetes mellitus or prior stroke. SPRINT was stopped earlier than planned, after a mean follow-up of 3.26 years, on the recommendation of its data and safety monitoring board, and data were published on 9 November 2015...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Alberto Zanchetti
The question of BP targets of antihypertensive treatment has been debated in recent guidelines, and reopened by publication of SPRINT. Although interpretation of SPRINT is made difficult by a preferential effect of more intense BP lowering on heart failure rather than stroke and myocardial infarction, and by a different method of BP measurement, recent meta-analyses by my group have shown SBP reduction <130 mmHg can reduce risk of cardiovascular (CV) outcomes further, but absolute benefit is smaller than that achieved across the 140 mmHg cutoff, and treatment discontinuations for adverse events become greater...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Ernesto Schiffrin
Hypertension has been defined by the levels of BP above which lowering BP will reduce the cardiovascular risk associated with elevated BP. This level has been classically 140/90 mmHg on the basis of actuarial data from the insurance industry. However, we now know that cardiovascular risk rises progressively from levels as low as 115/75 mmHg upward with a doubling of the incidence of both coronary heart disease and stroke for every 20/10-mmHg increment of BP. In uncomplicated hypertension without cardiovascular risk factors or target organ damage, there is little randomized clinical trial evidence that lowering SBP of <160 mmHg reduces cardiovascular risk...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
David Wheeler
Hypertension is the most prevalent complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Lowering high blood pressure slows progressive loss of kidney function and may also reduce the associated risk of cardiovascular complications, a common cause of premature death in CKD patients.Current International Guidelines produced by Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) acknowledges that no single BP target is optimal for all CKD patients, and encourages individualization of treatment depending on age, the severity of albuminuria and comorbidities...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Lawrence Appel
The identification of explicit blood pressure targets for clinical management remains controversial, particularly in older individuals with co-morbidities. Recommendations from the panel appointed to the Eighth Joint National Committee (JNC 8) and results of the SPRINT trial have rekindled interest in this issue. JNC8 recommended a higher (more relaxed) BP goal of < 150/90, instead of the traditional BP goal of <140/90, in persons aged 60+. In contrast, the recently completed SPRINT trial, which enrolled high risk patients without diabetes, documented that a lower (more stringent) SBP goal of <120 mmHg reduced total mortality and cardiovascular disease events compared to <140 mmHg...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
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