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Styloid process

Jeffrey D Hooker, David A Joyner, Edward P Farley, Majid Khan
Eagle syndrome is a rare condition resulting from elongation of the temporal styloid process or calcification of its associated stylohyoid ligaments. Although usually presenting with pain or odynophagia, Eagle syndrome has been reported to cause a multitude of neurologic symptoms or vascular complications, some of which can be life-threatening. We present a case in which an endovascularly placed internal carotid artery stent in close proximity to a calcified stylohyoid ligament resulted in stent fracture with subsequent stent and vessel occlusion...
June 2016: Journal of Radiology Case Reports
Ichiro Kawahara, Keisuke Ozono, Takashi Fujimoto, Makoto Hirose
Eagle syndrome is a well-known disease caused by elongation of the styloid process and/or calcification of the stylohyoid ligament, which interferes with adjacent anatomical structures, giving rise to acute cerebrovascular syndrome(ACVS)and/or pain. Although hyoid bone is also a stylohyoid complex, its association with ACVS is not well known. Thus, we investigated the anatomical relationship between the internal carotid artery(ICA)and the hyoid bone. Between January 2014 and December 2015, three-dimensional computed tomographic angiography(3D-CTA)of the neck was performed for 218 patients...
October 2016: No Shinkei Geka. Neurological Surgery
Antonio Luis Neto Custodio, Micena Roberta Miranda Alves E Silva, Mauro Henrique Abreu, Lucas Rodarte Abreu Araújo, Leandro Junqueira de Oliveira
Objective. To evaluate measures of the styloid process (SP) in Brazilian dry skulls. Methods. This study involves measurements of two points (lateral end posterior views) of 15 dry skulls held by the Morphology Department, Institute of Biological Sciences of Federal University of Minas Gerais. Results. There was a large variability for the length of left and right sides (in lateral and posterior views) of the styloid process. From the lateral view of the left and right styloid, the length of the SP ranged, respectively, from 10...
2016: BioMed Research International
Alastair J M Key
The human hand is unparalleled amongst primates in its ability to manipulate objects forcefully and dexterously. Previous research has predominantly sought to explain the evolution of these capabilities through an adaptive relationship between more modern human-like anatomical features in the upper limb and increased stone tool production and use proficiency. To date, however, we know little about the influence that other manipulatively demanding behaviors may have had upon the evolution of the human hand. The present study addresses one aspect of this deficiency by examining the recruitment of the distal phalanges during a range of manual transportation (i...
2016: PloS One
J Fan, B Jiang, F Yuan, S Z Li, J Q Zhou, J Mei, L M Cheng, G R Yu
Objective: To investigate the clinical character and treating strategy of extreme distal radial fractures. Methods: From June 2012 to May 2014, 12 patients who suffered from extreme distal radial fractures were treated in Department of Orthopedics, Tongji Hospital, Tongji University. According to AO/OTA classification, there were 4 cases of type 23B1, 3 cases of 23B2, 3 cases of 23C1 and 2 cases of 23C3.When classified by morphological features, there were 4 of simple styloid process fracture, 3 of simple extreme distal radial fracture without articular surface involved, 3 of styloid process fracture combined with distal radial articular fracture, and 2 of articular surface splintered or collapse fracture...
October 1, 2016: Zhonghua Wai Ke za Zhi [Chinese Journal of Surgery]
J O Olabisi
Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version.
August 1999: Saudi Medical Journal
Saleem I Abdulrauf, Ahmed M Ashour, Eric Marvin, Jeroen Coppens, Brian Kang, Tze Yu Yeh Hsieh, Breno Nery, Juan R Penanes, Aysha K Alsahlawi, Shawn Moore, Hussam Abou Al-Shaar, Joanna Kemp, Kanika Chawla, Nanthiya Sujijantarat, Alaa Najeeb, Nadeem Parkar, Vilaas Shetty, Tina Vafaie, Jastin Antisdel, Tony A Mikulec, Randall Edgell, Jonathan Lebovitz, Matt Pierson, Paulo Henrique Pires de Aguiar, Paula Buchanan, Angela Di Cosola, George Stevens
INTRODUCTION: Numerical classification systems for the internal carotid artery (ICA) are available, but modifications have added confusion to the numerical systems. Furthermore, previous classifications may not be applicable uniformly to microsurgical and endoscopic procedures. The purpose of this study was to develop a clinically useful classification system. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed cadaver dissections of the ICA in 5 heads (10 sides) and evaluated 648 internal carotid arteries with computed tomography angiography...
July 2016: Journal of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine
Keiichiro Oura, Hisao Moritomo, Toshiyuki Kataoka, Kunihiro Oka, Tsuyoshi Murase, Kazuomi Sugamoto, Hideki Yoshikawa
BACKGROUND: The purposes of this study were to quantitatively analyze osteophyte formation of the distal radius following scaphoid nonunion and to investigate how fracture locations relate to osteophyte formation patterns. METHODS: Three-dimensional surface models of the scaphoid and distal radius were constructed from computed tomographic images of both the wrists of 17 patients' with scaphoid nonunion. The scaphoid nonunions were classified into 3 types according to the location of the fracture line: distal extra-articular (n = 6); distal intra-articular (n = 5); and proximal (n = 6)...
August 30, 2016: Journal of Orthopaedic Science: Official Journal of the Japanese Orthopaedic Association
Demet Altun, Emre Çamci
We report a case of anesthetic management of a 43-year-old patient with Eagle's syndrome (ES) in whom post-extubation acute airway obstruction occurred due to bilateral hypoglossal nerve paralysis. After an accurate examination, elongated bilateral stylohyoid ligament was observed and surgical resection was planned. After completion of the surgery following extubation, significant dysfunction in swallowing, speech function, and tongue motion was observed. The clinical situation was evaluated as bilateral hypoglossal nerve paralysis related to the procedure...
August 20, 2016: Journal of Anesthesia
Cynthia A Luu, Ethan Larson, Timothy M Rankin, Jennifer L Pappalardo, Marvin J Slepian, David G Armstrong
We report on the use of free fat grafting as a means of redistributing normal and shear stress after healing of plantar diabetic foot wounds. Although fat augmentation (lipofilling) has been described previously as an approach to supplement defects and prevent atrophy, including use as an adjunct to wound healing and to mitigate pain in the foot, we are unaware of any reports in the medical literature that have described its use in the high-risk diabetic foot in remission. An active 37-year-old man with type 2 diabetes and neuropathy presented with gangrene of his fifth ray, which was amputated...
July 2016: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Global Open
Sang Ki Lee, Kap Jung Kim, Yong Han Cha, Won Sik Choy
Treatments for acute distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability with distal radius fracture vary from conservative to operative treatment, although it seems to be no consensus regarding which treatment is optimal. This prospective randomized study was designed to compare the clinical outcomes for operative and conservative treatment of acute DRUJ instability with distal radius fracture, according to the presence or absence and type of ulnar styloid process fracture and the degree of its displacement. Between July 2008 and February 2013, we enrolled 157 patients who exhibited an unstable DRUJ during intraoperative manual stress testing (via the ballottement test) after fixation of the distal radius...
September 2016: Annals of Plastic Surgery
Diego Z Carvalho, Christopher J Boes
As opposed to finger flexion response upon tapping the styloid process with absent brachioradialis reflex (inverted brachioradialis reflex), toe flexion response upon patellar percussion with absent quadriceps reflex is a quite underrecognized neurological sign, and has been reported only once in the literature. Similar to the inverted brachioradialis reflex, this sign can also be useful for neurological localization. We hereby report a patient presenting with signs and symptoms of lumbar radiculopathy in the setting of an anterior epidural mass compressing the cauda equina at L2-L4, without evidence of myelopathy...
October 2016: Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery
Hyung Suk Jung, Yong Beom Lee, Jae Sung Lee
BACKGROUND: There are significant variations in the anatomy of the dorsal cutaneous branch of the ulnar nerve (DCBUN). The DCBUN is at risk for iatrogenic injury during surgeries around the ulnar side of the wrist. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the relationship between the ulnar styloid process and the DCBUN and to confirm the DCBUN's change in location with different forearm positions. METHODS: We examined 9 fresh frozen cadaveric limbs to establish the course of this nerve...
February 2016: J Hand Surg Asian Pac Vol
In Yae Cheong, Im Joo Rhyu, Ki Hoon Kim, Phil Woo Chung, Dasom Kim, Byung Kyu Park, Dong Hwee Kim
BACKGROUND: It is important to understand the anatomical relationship between the medial and lateral branches of superficial radial nerve (SRN) and the first dorsal compartment to prevent and minimize possible injury to these nerves during various procedures around the tip of radial styloid process (RSP). OBJECTIVE: To delineate the anatomical location of the SRN in relation to the extensor pollicis brevis (EPB) and abductor pollicis longus (APL) tendons. STUDY DESIGN: Observational study...
July 2016: Pain Physician
Phil Woo Choung, Min Young Kim, Hyung Soon Im, Ki Hoon Kim, Im Joo Rhyu, Byung Kyu Park, Dong Hwee Kim
OBJECTIVE: To identify the anatomic characteristics of the pronator quadratus (PQ) muscle and the entry zone (EZ) of the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN) to this muscle by means of cadaver dissection. METHODS: We examined the PQ muscle and AIN in 20 forearms from 10 fresh cadavers. After identifying the PQ muscle and the EZ of the AIN, we measured the distances from the midpoint (MidP) of the PQ muscle and EZ to the vertical line passing the tip of the ulnar styloid process (MidP_X and EZ_X, respectively) and to the medial border of the ulna (MidP_Y and EZ_Y, respectively)...
June 2016: Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine
Vikash Ranjan, Shalu Rai, Deepankar Misra, Sapna Panjwani
Eagle's syndrome, also known as an elongated styloid process, is a condition that may be the source of craniofacial and cervical pain. It is infrequently reported but is probably more common than generally considered. The symptoms related to Eagle's syndrome can be confused with those attributed to a wide variety of facial neuralgia and or oral, dental, and temporomandibular joint diseases. In this paper, there are two cases, which reported to the Department of Oral Medicine, Diagnosis, and Maxillofacial Radiology, with a chief complaint of radiating pain in the preauricular region of the face...
July 2015: National Journal of Maxillofacial Surgery
Douglas S Weinberg, Paul J Park, Kaeleen A Boden, Kevin J Malone, Daniel R Cooperman, Raymond W Liu
BACKGROUND: Evaluating rotation during open reduction and internal fixation of a forearm fracture is of paramount importance. In challenging cases, surgeons may utilize radiographic relationships between proximal and distal radial and ulnar landmarks to assess rotational position. However, to our knowledge, limited anatomic data are available to confirm these relationships. METHODS: Six hundred cadaveric radii and ulnae were obtained. Digital representations of the bicipital tuberosity, the radial styloid, the coronoid process, and the ulnar styloid were acquired, and the rotational profiles between respective landmarks were calculated...
July 6, 2016: Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. American Volume
N Schmelzer-Schmied
OBJECTIVE: The goal of this operation technique is a stable refixation of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) to the fovea ulnaris. The stability of the distal radio-ulnar joint (DRUJ) should be re-established. The patients pain and the feeling of instability should be reduced. INDICATIONS: Lesions of the foveal component of the TFCC resulting in DRUJ instability. Combined lesions of both components of the TFCC. Complete detachment of the TFCC from the ulna either without fracture of the styloid process of the ulna or with fracture (floating styloid)...
August 2016: Operative Orthopädie und Traumatologie
Hakan Demirtaş, Mustafa Kayan, Hasan Rıfat Koyuncuoğlu, Ahmet Orhan Çelik, Mustafa Kara, Nihat Şengeze
BACKGROUND: Eagle syndrome is a condition caused by an elongated styloid process. Unilateral face, neck and ear pain, stinging pain, foreign body sensation and dysphagia can be observed with this syndrome. Rarely, the elongated styloid process may cause pain by compressing the cervical segment of the internal carotid and the surrounding sympathetic plexus, and that pain spreading along the artery can cause neurological symptoms such as vertigo and syncope. CASE REPORT: In this case report we presented a very rare eagle syndrome with neurological symptoms that occurred suddenly with cervical rotation...
2016: Polish Journal of Radiology
Walid Mnari, Mohamed Kilani, Khaled Harrathi, Mezri Maatouk, Jamel Koubaa, Mondher Golli
Posttraumatic Unilateral paralysis of the last four cranial nerves (IX-XI), known as collet-Sicard syndrome, is rare following closed head injury. A 21-year-old man presented with slurred speech, hoarseness voice and difficulty swallowing his saliva following closed head trauma. The cranial nerve examination revealed left sided severe dysfunction of cranial nerves VII, IX, X, XI, and XII. A CT-Scan of the neck was performed demonstrating a fracture of the left styloid process at the base of the skull. The Magnetic Resonance Imaging showed unusually well seen lower cranial nerves due to nerve edema...
2016: Pan African Medical Journal
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