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Huntington' disease

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28938121/huntingtin-fibrils-poke-membranes
#1
Pedro Guedes-Dias, Erika L F Holzbaur
A hallmark of Huntington's disease is the presence of intracellular aggregates of mutant huntingtin, the pathological significance of which has long been debated. Using cryo-electron tomography, Bauerlein et al. reveal the fibrillary structure of huntingtin aggregates in situ and show that huntingtin fibrils interact with the endoplasmic reticulum, distorting its morphology and dynamics.
September 21, 2017: Cell
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28937758/monomeric-huntingtin-exon-1-has-similar-overall-structural-features-for-wild-type-and-pathological-polyglutamine-lengths
#2
John B Warner, Kiersten Ruff, Piau Siong Tan, Edward A Lemke, Rohit V Pappu, Hilal A Lashuel
Huntington's disease is caused by expansion of a polyglutamine (polyQ) domain within exon 1 of the huntingtin gene (Httex1). A popular hypothesis is that the Httex1 protein undergoes sharp conformational changes as the polyQ length exceeds a threshold of 36 residues. We test this hypothesis by combining novel semi-synthesis strategies with state-of-the-art single molecule Förster resonance energy transfer measurements on biologically relevant Httex1 proteins of five different polyQ lengths. Our results, integrated with atomistic simulations, negate the hypothesis of a sharp, polyQ length-dependent change in the structure of monomeric Httex1...
September 22, 2017: Journal of the American Chemical Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28935191/circadian-rhythm-and-autonomic-dysfunction-in-presymptomatic-and-early-huntington-s-disease
#3
Elena Bellosta Diago, Jesús Pérez Pérez, Sonia Santos Lasaosa, Alejandro Viloria Alebesque, Saül Martínez Horta, Jaime Kulisevsky, Javier López Del Val
INTRODUCTION: Sleep and circadian rhythm disturbances are common in patients with neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease (HD). The aim of this study was to evaluate variability in circadian blood pressure (BP) to determine the association between abnormal circadian BP and sleep quality in patients with HD. METHODS: Cross-sectional, multicenter study of 38 HD mutation carriers (23 premanifest and 15 early stage patients) who were compared to 38 age- and sex-matched controls...
September 15, 2017: Parkinsonism & related Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28934397/a-modifier-of-huntington-s-disease-onset-at-the-mlh1-locus
#4
Jong-Min Lee, Michael J Chao, Denise Harold, Kawther Abu Elneel, Tammy Gillis, Peter Holmans, Lesley Jones, Michael Orth, Richard H Myers, Seung Kwak, Vanessa C Wheeler, Marcy E MacDonald, James F Gusella
Huntington's disease (HD) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by an expanded CAG repeat in HTT. Many clinical characteristics of HD such as age at motor onset are determined largely by the size of HTT CAG repeat. However, emerging evidence strongly supports a role for other genetic factors in modifying the disease pathogenesis driven by mutant huntingtin. A recent genome-wide association analysis to discover genetic modifiers of HD onset age provided initial evidence for modifier loci on chromosomes 8 and 15 and suggestive evidence for a locus on chromosome 3...
October 1, 2017: Human Molecular Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28934390/protein-phosphatase-1-regulates-huntingtin-exon-1-aggregation-and-toxicity
#5
Joana Branco-Santos, Federico Herrera, Gonçalo M Poças, Yolanda Pires-Afonso, Flaviano Giorgini, Pedro M Domingos, Tiago F Outeiro
Huntington's disease is neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the N-terminal region of the huntingtin protein (N17). Here, we analysed the relative contribution of each phosphorylatable residue in the N17 region (T3, S13 and S16) towards huntingtin exon 1 (HTTex1) oligomerization, aggregation and toxicity in human cells and Drosophila neurons. We used bimolecular fluorescence complementation to show that expression of single phosphomimic mutations completely abolished HTTex1 aggregation in human cells...
October 1, 2017: Human Molecular Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28934250/changes-in-striatal-activity-and-functional-connectivity-in-a-mouse-model-of-huntington-s-disease
#6
Magali Cabanas, Fares Bassil, Nicole Mons, Maurice Garret, Yoon H Cho
Hereditary Huntington's disease (HD) is associated with progressive motor, cognitive and psychiatric symptoms. A primary consequence of the HD mutation is the preferential loss of medium spiny projection cells with relative sparing of local interneurons in the striatum. In addition, among GABAergic striatal projection cells, indirect pathway cells expressing D2 dopamine receptors are lost earlier than direct pathway cells expressing D1 receptors. To test in vivo the functional integrity of direct and indirect pathways as well as interneurons in the striatum of male R6/1 transgenic mice, we assessed their c-Fos expression levels induced by a striatal-dependent cognitive task and compared them with age-matched wild-type littermates...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28932207/model-based-magnetization-transfer-imaging-markers-to-characterize-patients-and-asymptomatic-gene-carriers-in-huntington-s-disease
#7
Roland Wiest, Jean-Marc Burgunder, Claus Kiefer
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Huntington's disease (HD) is a chronic progressive neurodegenerative disorder with a long presymptomatic period that opens a window for potential therapies aimed at neuroprotection. Neuroimaging offers the potential to monitor disease-related progression of the disease burden (DB) using model-based magnetization transfer imaging. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We have conducted a cross-sectional study to stratify healthy age-matched controls, premanifest and symptomatic HD patients (n = 30) according to their macromolecular depositions in the caudate nucleus...
2017: Frontiers in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28931805/identifying-therapeutic-targets-by-combining-transcriptional-data-with-ordinal-clinical-measurements
#8
Leila Pirhaji, Pamela Milani, Simona Dalin, Brook T Wassie, Denise E Dunn, Robert J Fenster, Julian Avila-Pacheco, Paul Greengard, Clary B Clish, Myriam Heiman, Donald C Lo, Ernest Fraenkel
The immense and growing repositories of transcriptional data may contain critical insights for developing new therapies. Current approaches to mining these data largely rely on binary classifications of disease vs. control, and are not able to incorporate measures of disease severity. We report an analytical approach to integrate ordinal clinical information with transcriptomics. We apply this method to public data for a large cohort of Huntington's disease patients and controls, identifying and prioritizing phenotype-associated genes...
September 20, 2017: Nature Communications
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28930690/the-self-inactivating-kamicas9-system-for-the-editing-of-cns-disease-genes
#9
Nicolas Merienne, Gabriel Vachey, Lucie de Longprez, Cécile Meunier, Virginie Zimmer, Guillaume Perriard, Mathieu Canales, Amandine Mathias, Lucas Herrgott, Tim Beltraminelli, Axelle Maulet, Thomas Dequesne, Catherine Pythoud, Maria Rey, Luc Pellerin, Emmanuel Brouillet, Anselme L Perrier, Renaud du Pasquier, Nicole Déglon
Neurodegenerative disorders are a major public health problem because of the high frequency of these diseases. Genome editing with the CRISPR/Cas9 system is making it possible to modify the sequence of genes linked to these disorders. We designed the KamiCas9 self-inactivating editing system to achieve transient expression of the Cas9 protein and high editing efficiency. In the first application, the gene responsible for Huntington's disease (HD) was targeted in adult mouse neuronal and glial cells. Mutant huntingtin (HTT) was efficiently inactivated in mouse models of HD, leading to an improvement in key markers of the disease...
September 19, 2017: Cell Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28929129/an-automated-home-cage-system-to-assess-learning-and-performance-of-a-skilled-motor-task-in-a-mouse-model-of-huntington-s-disease
#10
Cameron L Woodard, Federico Bolaños, James D Boyd, Gergely Silasi, Timothy H Murphy, Lynn A Raymond
Behavioral testing is a critical step in assessing the validity of rodent models of neurodegenerative disease, as well as evaluating the efficacy of pharmacological interventions. In models of Huntington's disease (HD), a gradual progression of impairments is observed across ages, increasing the need for sensitive, high-throughput and longitudinal assessments. Recently, a number of automated systems have been developed to perform behavioral profiling of animals within their own home-cage, allowing for 24-h monitoring and minimizing experimenter interaction...
September 2017: ENeuro
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28927719/sex-dependent-behavioral-impairments-in-the-hdhq350-mouse-line
#11
Jessica K Cao, Peter J Detloff, Richard G Gardner, Nephi Stella
Huntington's Disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease characterized by gradual deterioration of motor and cognitive functions and development of psychiatric deficits. Animal models provide powerful means to study the pathological processes, molecular dysfunctions and symptoms associated with HD. We performed a longitudinal behavioral study of the newly developed HdhQ350/+ mouse line, a knock-in model that expresses a repeat of 350 glutamines. We found remarkable sex-dependent differences on symptom onset and severity...
September 16, 2017: Behavioural Brain Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28926091/functional-role-of-mesenchymal-stem-cells-in-the-treatment-of-chronic-neurodegenerative-diseases
#12
Debora Lo Furno, Giuliana Mannino, Rosario Giuffrida
Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can differentiate into not only cells of mesodermal lineages, but also into endodermal and ectodermal derived elements, including neurons and glial cells. For this reason, MSCs have been extensively investigated to develop cell-based therapeutic strategies, especially in pathologies whose pharmacological treatments give poor results, if any. As in the case of irreversible neurological disorders characterized by progressive neuronal death, in which behavioral and cognitive functions of patients inexorably decline as the disease progresses...
September 19, 2017: Journal of Cellular Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28923312/autophagy-its-mechanisms-and-regulation-implications-in-neurodegenerative-diseases
#13
REVIEW
Milad Moloudizargari, Mohammad Hossein Asghari, Emad Ghobadi, Marjan Fallah, Shima Rasouli, Mohammad Abdollahi
Autophagy is a major regulatory cellular mechanism which gives the cell an ability to cope with some of the destructive events that normally occur within a metabolically living cell. This is done by maintaining the cellular homeostasis, clearance of damaged organelles and proteins and recycling necessary molecules like amino acids and fatty acids. There is a wide array of factors that influence autophagy in the state of health and disease. Disruption of these mechanisms may not only give rise to several autophagy-related disease, but also it can occur as the result of intracellular changes induced during disease pathogenesis causing exacerbation of the disease...
September 15, 2017: Ageing Research Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28923065/the-heat-shock-response-in-neurons-and-astroglia-and-its-role-in-neurodegenerative-diseases
#14
REVIEW
Rebecca San Gil, Lezanne Ooi, Justin J Yerbury, Heath Ecroyd
Protein inclusions are a predominant molecular pathology found in numerous neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Huntington's disease. Protein inclusions form in discrete areas of the brain characteristic to the type of neurodegenerative disease, and coincide with the death of neurons in that region (e.g. spinal cord motor neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis). This suggests that the process of protein misfolding leading to inclusion formation is neurotoxic, and that cell-autonomous and non-cell autonomous mechanisms that maintain protein homeostasis (proteostasis) can, at times, be insufficient to prevent protein inclusion formation in the central nervous system...
September 18, 2017: Molecular Neurodegeneration
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28922164/analysis-of-participant-withdrawal-in-huntington-disease-clinical-trials
#15
Haruhiko Banno, Kelly L Andrzejewski, Michael P McDermott, Alyssa Murphy, Madhurima Majumder, Elisabeth A de Blieck, Peggy Auinger, Merit E Cudkowicz, Nazem Atassi
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 14, 2017: Journal of Huntington's Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28920889/therapies-targeting-dna-and-rna-in-huntington-s-disease
#16
REVIEW
Edward J Wild, Sarah J Tabrizi
No disease-slowing treatment exists for Huntington's disease, but its monogenic inheritance makes it an appealing candidate for the development of therapies targeting processes close to its genetic cause. Huntington's disease is caused by CAG repeat expansions in the HTT gene, which encodes the huntingtin protein; development of therapies to target HTT transcription and the translation of its mRNA is therefore an area of intense investigation. Huntingtin-lowering strategies include antisense oligonucleotides and RNA interference targeting mRNA, and zinc finger transcriptional repressors and CRISPR-Cas9 methods aiming to reduce transcription by targeting DNA...
October 2017: Lancet Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28920551/a-comprehensive-in-silico-analysis-of-huntingtin-and-its-interactome
#17
Valentina Brandi, Valentina Di Lella, Maria Marino, Paolo Ascenzi, Fabio Polticelli
A polyglutamine expansion of the N-terminal region of huntingtin (Htt) causes Huntington's disease (HD), a severe neurodegenerative disorder. Htt huge multidomain structure, the presence of disordered regions, and the lack of sequence homologs of known structure, so far prevented structural studies of Htt, making the study of its structure-function relationships very difficult. In this work, the presence and location of five Htt ordered domains (named from Hunt1 to Hunt5) has been detected and the structure of these domains has been predicted for the first time using a combined threading/ab initio modelling approach...
September 18, 2017: Journal of Biomolecular Structure & Dynamics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28920088/metabolic-and-transcriptomic-analysis-of-huntington-s-disease-model-reveal-changes-in-intracellular-glucose-levels-and-related-genes
#18
Gepoliano Chaves, Rıfat Emrah Özel, Namrata V Rao, Hana Hadiprodjo, Yvonne Da Costa, Zachary Tokuno, Nader Pourmand
Huntington's Disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expansion in a CAG-tri-nucleotide repeat that introduces a poly-glutamine stretch into the huntingtin protein (mHTT). Mutant huntingtin (mHTT) has been associated with several phenotypes including mood disorders and depression. Additionally, HD patients are known to be more susceptible to type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and HD mice model develops diabetes. However, the mechanism and pathways that link Huntington's disease and diabetes have not been well established...
August 2017: Heliyon
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28920068/tetrabenazine-versus-deutetrabenazine-for-huntington-s-disease-twins-or-distant-cousins
#19
Filipe B Rodrigues, Gonçalo S Duarte, João Costa, Joaquim J Ferreira, Edward J Wild
BACKGROUND: Tetrabenazine is the only US Food and Drug Administration-approved drug for Huntington's disease, and deutetrabenazine was recently tested against placebo. A switching-trial from tetrabenazine to deutetrabenazine is underway, but no head-to-head, blinded, randomized controlled trial is planned. Using meta-analytical methodology, the authors compared these molecules. METHODS: RCTs comparing tetrabenazine or deutetrabenazine with placebo in Huntington's disease were searched...
July 2017: Movement Disorders Clinical Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28917260/roles-of-sigma-1-receptors-on-mitochondrial-functions-relevant-to-neurodegenerative-diseases
#20
REVIEW
Tzu-Yu Weng, Shang-Yi Anne Tsai, Tsung-Ping Su
The sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) is a chaperone that resides mainly at the mitochondrion-associated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane (called the MAMs) and acts as a dynamic pluripotent modulator in living systems. At the MAM, the Sig-1R is known to play a role in regulating the Ca(2+) signaling between ER and mitochondria and in maintaining the structural integrity of the MAM. The MAM serves as bridges between ER and mitochondria regulating multiple functions such as Ca(2+) transfer, energy exchange, lipid synthesis and transports, and protein folding that are pivotal to cell survival and defense...
September 16, 2017: Journal of Biomedical Science
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