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Huntington' disease

Shivaji Thadke, J Dinithi R Perera, V M Hridya, Kirti Bhatt, Ashif Yasin Shaikh, Wei-Che Hsieh, Mengshen David Chen, Chakicherla Gayathri, Roberto R Gil, Gordon S Rule, Arnab Mukherjee, Charles A Thornton, Danith H Ly
We report the development of a new class of nucleic acid ligands that is comprised of Janus bases and MPPNA backbone and is capable of binding rCAG-repeats in a sequence-specific and selective manner via, inference, bivalent H-bonding interactions. Individually, the interactions between ligands and RNA are weak and transient. However, upon the installation of C-terminal thioester and N-terminal cystine and the reduction of disulfide bond, they undergo template-directed native chemical ligation to form concatenated oligomeric products that bind tightly to the RNA template...
March 21, 2018: Biochemistry
Jason Brandt
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2018: Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology: Official Journal of the Society for Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology
Daniel R Scoles, Stefan M Pulst
Therapeutics that directly target RNAs are promising for a broad spectrum of disorders, including the neurodegenerative diseases. This is exemplified by the FDA approval of Nusinersen, an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) therapeutic for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). RNA targeting therapeutics are currently under development for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Huntington's disease (HD), and spinocerebellar ataxias. We have used an ASO approach toward developing a treatment for spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2), for targeting the causative gene ATXN2...
March 21, 2018: RNA Biology
Kathleen Griffioen, Mark P Mattson, Eitan Okun
Huntington's disease (HD), an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive striatal and cortical atrophy, has been strongly linked with neuroinflammation. Toll-like receptors, a family of innate immune receptors, are a major pathway for neuroinflammation with pleiotropic effects on neuronal plasticity and neurodevelopment. We assessed whether deficiency for TLRs 2, 3 or 4 affects life expectancy in the N171-82Q mouse model of HD. Our data indicate that homozygous TLRs 2 and 3 as well as heterozygous TLR4 deficiency significantly extends the life expectancy of HD mice...
January 2018: Heliyon
Ghulam Hussain, Azhar Rasul, Haseeb Anwar, Nimra Aziz, Aroona Razzaq, Wei Wei, Muhammad Ali, Jiang Li, Xiaomeng Li
Neurodegenerative diseases are conventionally demarcated as disorders with selective loss of neurons. Conventional as well as newer molecules have been tested but they offer just symptomatic advantages along with abundant side effects. The discovery of more compelling molecules that can halt the pathology of these diseases will be considered as a miracle of present time. Several synthetic compounds are available but they may cause several other health issues. Therefore, natural molecules from the plants and other sources are being discovered to replace available medicines...
2018: International Journal of Biological Sciences
Alba Di Pardo, Vittorio Maglione
Huntington's disease (HD) is a single-gene inheritable neurodegenerative disorder with an associated complex molecular pathogenic profile that renders it the most 'curable incurable' brain disorder. Continuous effort in the field has contributed to the recent discovery of novel potential pathogenic mechanisms. Findings in preclinical models of the disease as well as in human post-mortem brains from affected patients demonstrate that alteration of the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) axis may represent a possible key player in the pathogenesis of the disease and may act as a potential actionable drug target for the development of more targeted and effective therapeutic approaches...
March 17, 2018: Trends in Pharmacological Sciences
Nora E Fritz, Nicholas R Boileau, Julie C Stout, Rebecca Ready, Joel S Perlmutter, Jane S Paulsen, Kimberly Quaid, Stacey Barton, Michael K McCormack, Susan L Perlman, Noelle E Carlozzi
Up to 90% of individuals with Huntington's disease (HD)-a progressive, inherited neurodegenerative disorder-experience apathy. Apathy is particularly debilitating because it is marked by a reduction in goal-directed behaviors, including self-care, social interactions, and mobility. The objective of this study was to examine relationships between variables of apathy, functional status, physical function, cognitive function, behavioral status/emotional function, and health-related quality of life. Clinician-rated measures of physical, cognitive, and behavioral function, including one clinician-rated item on apathy, and self-reported measures of physical function, health-related quality of life, and emotional, cognitive, and social function were collected in a single session from 487 persons with the HD mutation (prodromal, N=193; early-stage manifest, N=186; late-stage manifest, N=108)...
March 21, 2018: Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
Natascia De Lucia, Silvio Peluso, Alessandro Roca, Cinzia Valeria Russo, Marco Massarelli, Giovanna De Michele, Luigi Di Maio, Elena Salvatore, Giuseppe De Michele
Objective: In visuo-constructional tasks, patients may reproduce drawings near-to or superimposed on a model, showing the so-called "Closing-in" (CI), often ascribed to a defect in inhibitory control. CI has been described in neurological conditions, but no studies have explored CI in Huntington's disease (HD), a neurodegenerative disorder often involving the frontal cortical-subcortical circuits. We searched for the occurrence of CI in HD patients and systematically investigated its correlates to find a clinical marker of the frontal/executive dysfunctions in the early examination of HD patients...
March 15, 2018: Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology: the Official Journal of the National Academy of Neuropsychologists
Joseph Ochaba, Eva L Morozko, Jacqueline G O'Rourke, Leslie M Thompson
The accumulation of misfolded proteins is central to pathology in Huntington's disease (HD) and many other neurodegenerative disorders. Specifically, a key pathological feature of HD is the aberrant accumulation of mutant HTT (mHTT) protein into high molecular weight complexes and intracellular inclusion bodies composed of fragments and other proteins. Conventional methods to measure and understand the contributions of various forms of mHTT-containing aggregates include fluorescence microscopy, western blot analysis, and filter trap assays...
February 27, 2018: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
Andrea K H Stavoe, Erika L F Holzbaur
Neurons are long-lived and highly polarized cells that depend on autophagy to maintain cellular homeostasis. The robust, constitutive biogenesis of autophagosomes in the distal axon occurs via a conserved pathway that is required to maintain functional synapses and prevent axon degeneration. Autophagosomes are formed de novo at the axon terminal in a stepwise assembly process, engulfing mitochondrial fragments, aggregated proteins, and bulk cytosol in what appears to be a nonselective uptake mechanism. Following formation, autophagosomes fuse with late endosomes/lysosomes and then are rapidly and efficiently transported along the axon toward the soma, driven by the microtubule motor cytoplasmic dynein...
March 13, 2018: Neuroscience Letters
Audrey M Bernstein, Robert Ritch, J Mario Wolosin
Exfoliation syndrome (XFS) is an age-related disease involving the deposition of aggregated fibrillar material (XFM) at extracellular matrices in tissues that synthesize elastic fibers. Its main morbidity is in the eye, where XFM accumulations form on the surface of the ciliary body, iris and lens. Exfoliation glaucoma (XFG) occurs in a high proportion of persons with XFS and can be a rapidly progressing disease. Worldwide, XFG accounts for about 25% of open-angle glaucoma cases. XFS and XFG show a sharp age-dependence, similarly to the many age-related diseases classified as aggregopathies...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Glaucoma
Chye Soi Moi, Chia Kin Yen, Khuen Yen Ng, Koh Rhun Yian
Protein misfolding and aggregation have been considered the common pathological hallmarks for a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD). These abnormal proteins aggregation damage mitochondria and induce oxidative stress and resulting neuronal cell death. Prolong neuronal damage activates microglia and astrocytes, development of inflammation reaction and further promotes neurodegeneration. Thus, elimination of abnormal proteins aggregation without eliciting any adverse effects are the main treatment strategies...
March 15, 2018: CNS & Neurological Disorders Drug Targets
Tiffany A Thibaudeau, Raymond T Anderson, David M Smith
Protein accumulation and aggregation with a concomitant loss of proteostasis often contribute to neurodegenerative diseases, and the ubiquitin-proteasome system plays a major role in protein degradation and proteostasis. Here, we show that three different proteins from Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's disease that misfold and oligomerize into a shared three-dimensional structure potently impair the proteasome. This study indicates that the shared conformation allows these oligomers to bind and inhibit the proteasome with low nanomolar affinity, impairing ubiquitin-dependent and ubiquitin-independent proteasome function in brain lysates...
March 15, 2018: Nature Communications
Sheikh Arslan Sehgal, Mirza A Hammad, Rana Adnan Tahir, Hafiza Nisha Akram, Faheem Ahmad
BACKGROUND: As the number of elderly persons increases, neurodegenerative diseases are becoming ubiquitous. There is currently a great need for knowledge concerning management of old-age neurodegenerative diseases; the most important of which are: Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, and Huntington's disease. OBJECTIVE: To summarize the potential of computationally predicted molecules and targets against neurodegenerative diseases...
March 15, 2018: Current Neuropharmacology
Julie A Reisz, Alexander S Barrett, Travis Nemkov, Kirk C Hansen, Angelo D'Alessandro
Proteins have been historically regarded as "nature's robots": Molecular machines that are essential to cellular/extracellular physical mechanical properties and catalyze key reactions for cell/system viability. However, these robots are kept in check by other protein-based machinery to preserve proteome integrity and stability. During aging, protein homeostasis is challenged by oxidation, decreased synthesis, and increasingly inefficient mechanisms responsible for repairing or degrading damaged proteins...
March 14, 2018: Expert Review of Proteomics
Elena Bellosta Diago, Jesús Pérez-Pérez, Sonia Santos Lasaosa, Alejandro Viloria Alebesque, Saül Martínez-Horta, Jaime Kulisevsky, Javier López Del Val
Cardiovascular events are a major cause of early death in the Huntington's disease (HD) population. Dysautonomia as well as deterioration of circadian rhythms can be detected early in the disease progression and can have profound effects on cardiac health. The aim of the present study was to determine if HD patients and premanifest mutation carriers present a higher risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) than non-mutation carrying controls METHODS: Prospective, cross-sectional, multicentre study of 38 HD mutation carriers (23 premanifest and 15 early-stage patients) compared to 38 age- and gender-matched healthy controls...
March 14, 2018: European Journal of Neurology: the Official Journal of the European Federation of Neurological Societies
Daphne Stam, Yun-An Huang, Jan Van den Stock
Personality reflects the set of psychological traits and mechanisms characteristic for an individual. Geno-neuro-biologically inspired personality accounts have proposed a set of temperaments and characters that jointly compose personality profiles. The present study addresses the link between neurobiology and personality and investigates the association between temperament traits and regional gray matter volume. Furthermore, the specificity of these associations as well as the underlying components that drive the association are addressed...
2018: Frontiers in Psychology
Magdalena Dabrowska, Wojciech Juzwa, Wlodzimierz J Krzyzosiak, Marta Olejniczak
Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of CAG repeats in the first exon of the huntingtin gene ( HTT ). The accumulation of polyglutamine-rich huntingtin proteins affects various cellular functions and causes selective degeneration of neurons in the striatum. Therapeutic strategies used to date to silence the expression of mutant HTT include antisense oligonucleotides, RNA interference-based approaches and, recently, genome editing with the CRISPR/Cas9 system...
2018: Frontiers in Neuroscience
Maria V Soloveva, Sharna D Jamadar, Govinda Poudel, Nellie Georgiou-Karistianis
The 'reserve' hypothesis posits that the brain undergoes structural and functional reorganisation to actively cope with brain damage or disease. Consistent with passive and active components of 'reserve', the brain moderates its biological substrates (brain reserve) and differentially changes the level of neural activity in tasks-specific networks and/or by recruiting additional non-task related brain regions (cognitive reserve) to optimise behavioural performance. How the 'reserve' hypothesis applies in neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease (HD) remains unknown...
March 10, 2018: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Laurie Galvan, Laetitia Francelle, Marie-Claude Gaillard, Lucie de Longprez, Maria-Angeles Carrillo-de Sauvage, Géraldine Liot, Karine Cambon, Lev Stimmer, Sophie Luccantoni, Julien Flament, Julien Valette, Michel de Chaldée, Gwenaelle Auregan, Martine Guillermier, Charlène Joséphine, Fanny Petit, Caroline Jan, Margot Jarrige, Noëlle Dufour, Gilles Bonvento, Sandrine Humbert, Frédéric Saudou, Philippe Hantraye, Karine Merienne, Alexis-Pierre Bemelmans, Anselme L Perrier, Nicole Déglon, Emmanuel Brouillet
The neurobiological functions of a number of kinases expressed in the brain are unknown. Here, we report new findings on DCLK3 (doublecortin like kinase 3), which is preferentially expressed in neurons in the striatum and dentate gyrus. Its function has never been investigated. DCLK3 expression is markedly reduced in Huntington's disease. Recent data obtained in studies related to cancer suggest DCLK3 could have an anti-apoptotic effect. Thus, we hypothesized that early loss of DCLK3 in Huntington's disease may render striatal neurons more susceptible to mutant huntingtin (mHtt)...
March 9, 2018: Brain: a Journal of Neurology
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