Read by QxMD icon Read

Parasite-host interaction

Teresa C Assumpção, Daniella M Mizurini, Dongying Ma, Robson Q Monteiro, Sydney Ahlstedt, Morayma Reyes, Michail Kotsyfakis, Thomas N Mather, John F Andersen, Jan Lukszo, José M C Ribeiro, Ivo M B Francischetti
Tick saliva is a rich source of modulators of vascular biology. We have characterized Ixonnexin, a member of the "Basic-tail" family of salivary proteins from the tick Ixodes scapularis. Ixonnexin is a 104 residues (11.8 KDa), non-enzymatic basic protein which contains 3 disulfide bonds and a C-terminal rich in lysine. It is homologous to SALP14, a tick salivary FXa anticoagulant. Ixonnexin was produced by ligation of synthesized fragments (51-104) and (1-50) followed by folding. Ixonnexin, like SALP14, interacts with FXa...
March 19, 2018: Scientific Reports
Suzanne Scheele, Jennifer A Geiger, Amy E DeRocher, Ryan Choi, Tess R Smith, Matthew A Hulverson, Rama Subba Rao Vidadala, Lynn K Barrett, Dustin J Maly, Ethan A Merritt, Kayode K Ojo, Wesley C Van Voorhis, Marilyn Parsons
In Toxoplasma gondii , calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (CDPK1) is an essential protein kinase required for invasion of host cells. We have developed several hundred CDPK1 inhibitors, many of which block invasion. Inhibitors with similar IC50 s were tested in thermal shift assays for their ability to stabilize CDPK1 in cell lysates, in intact cells, or in purified form. Compounds that inhibited parasite growth stabilized CDPK1 in all assays. In contrast, two compounds that showed poor growth inhibition stabilized CDPK1 in lysates but not in cells...
March 19, 2018: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
Thomas Spallek, Pamela Gan, Yasuhiro Kadota, Ken Shirasu
Virulence factors are molecules that enable plant pathogens to infect and colonize host tissues successfully. These molecules co-evolve with host genes to ensure functionality and to avoid recognition by the host immune system. Some pathogens also produce the plant growth hormone cytokinin (CK) and other plant hormones that contribute to virulence without being subjected to the molecular arms race. Here, we summarize recent findings regarding the role of CKs during infection and the establishment of plant diseases...
March 16, 2018: Current Opinion in Plant Biology
Philip B Greenspoon, Sydney Banton, Nicole Mideo
Predators may be limited in their ability to kill prey (i.e., have type II or III functional responses), an insight that has had far-reaching consequences in the ecological literature. With few exceptions, however, this possibility has not been extended to the behaviour of immune cells, which kill pathogens much as predators kill their prey. Rather, models of the within-host environment have tended to tacitly assume that immune cells have an unlimited ability to target and kill pathogens (i.e., a type I functional response)...
March 16, 2018: Journal of Theoretical Biology
Elena Sanchez, Emma Artuso, Chiara Lombardi, Ivan Visentin, Beatrice Lace, Wajeeha Saeed, Marco L Lolli, Piermichele Kobauri, Zahid Ali, Francesca Spyrakis, Pilar Cubas, Francesca Cardinale, Cristina Prandi
Strigolactones (SLs) are plant hormones with various functions in development, responses to stress and interaction with (micro)organisms in the rhizosphere, including seeds of parasitic plants. Their perception for hormonal functions requires an α,β-hydrolase belonging to the D14 clade in higher plants; perception of host-produced SLs in parasitic seeds relies on similar but phylogenetically distinct proteins (D14-like). D14 and D14-like proteins are peculiar receptors, because they cleave SLs before undergoing a conformational change that elicits downstream events...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Experimental Botany
María Andrea Hernández-Castañeda, Smart Mbagwu, Kehinde Adebayo Babatunde, Michael Walch, Luis Filgueira, Pierre-Yves Mantel
Malaria is a life-threatening disease caused by Plasmodium parasites, with P. falciparum being the most prevalent on the African continent and responsible for most malaria-related deaths globally. Several factors including parasite sequestration in tissues, vascular dysfunction, and inflammatory responses influence the evolution of the disease in malaria-infected people. P. falciparum-infected red blood cells (iRBCs) release small extracellular vesicles (EVs) containing different kinds of cargo molecules that mediate pathogenesis and cellular communication between parasites and host...
February 14, 2018: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
A Leoni Swart, Christopher F Harrison, Ludwig Eichinger, Michael Steinert, Hubert Hilbi
Environmental bacteria of the genus Legionella naturally parasitize free-living amoebae. Upon inhalation of bacteria-laden aerosols, the opportunistic pathogens grow intracellularly in alveolar macrophages and can cause a life-threatening pneumonia termed Legionnaires' disease. Intracellular replication in amoebae and macrophages takes place in a unique membrane-bound compartment, the Legionella -containing vacuole (LCV). LCV formation requires the bacterial Icm/Dot type IV secretion system, which translocates literally hundreds of "effector" proteins into host cells, where they modulate crucial cellular processes for the pathogen's benefit...
2018: Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology
Hadas Urca, Frida Ben-Ami
The microsporidian parasite Hamiltosporidium tvaerminnensis can infect Daphnia magna both horizontally (through environmental spores) and vertically (through parthenogenetic and sexually produced eggs). The spores of H. tvaerminnensis come in three distinguishable morphologies, which are thought to have different roles in the transmission of the parasite. In this study, we examined the role of the two most common spore morphologies (i.e. oval-shaped spores and pear-shaped spores) in horizontal transmission of H...
March 16, 2018: Parasitology
Valeria Messina, Mauro Valtieri, Mercedes Rubio, Mario Falchi, Francesca Mancini, Alfredo Mayor, Pietro Alano, Francesco Silvestrini
The gametocytes of Plasmodium falciparum , responsible for the transmission of this malaria parasite from humans to mosquitoes, accumulate and mature preferentially in the human bone marrow. In the 10 day long sexual development of P. falciparum , the immature gametocytes reach and localize in the extravascular compartment of this organ, in contact with several bone marrow stroma cell types, prior to traversing the endothelial lining and re-entering in circulation at maturity. To investigate the host parasite interplay underlying this still obscure process, we developed an in vitro tridimensional co-culture system in a Matrigel scaffold with P...
2018: Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology
Oneida Espinosa-Álvarez, Paola A Ortiz, Luciana Lima, André G Costa-Martins, Myrna G Serrano, Stephane Herder, Gregory A Buck, Erney P Camargo, Patrick B Hamilton, Jamie R Stevens, Marta M G Teixeira
Trypanosoma rangeli and Trypanosoma cruzi are generalist trypanosomes sharing a wide range of mammalian hosts; they are transmitted by triatomine bugs, and are the only trypanosomes infecting humans in the Neotropics. Their origins, phylogenetic relationships, and emergence as human parasites have long been subjects of interest. In the present study, taxon-rich analyses (20 trypanosome species from bats and terrestrial mammals) using ssrRNA, glycosomal glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gGAPDH), heat shock protein-70 (HSP70) and Spliced Leader (SL) RNA sequences, and multilocus phylogenetic analyses using 11 single copy genes from 15 selected trypanosomes, provide increased resolution of relationships between species and clades, strongly supporting two main sister lineages: lineage Schizotrypanum, comprising T...
March 12, 2018: International Journal for Parasitology
Eleuza Rodrigues Machado, Núbia Oliveira Matos, Sinione Morais Rezende, Daniela Carlos, Thauana Cristina Silva, Leônia Rodrigues, Maria Jarlene Rodrigues Almeida, Maria Regina Fernandes de Oliveira, Maria Imaculada Muniz-Junqueira, Rodrigo Gurgel-Gonçalves
Host-parasite interactions in diabetic patients might influence diabetes complications and intestinal parasitosis. The aim was to investigate the occurrence of enteroparasites in individuals with diabetes types 1 and 2. A descriptive study was designed to estimate frequencies of parasites and to compare them in individuals with diabetes types 1 and 2 from two Health Centers and one hospital in the Federal District of Brazil. Patients were allocated to the study by convenience. Three fecal samples of 156 diabetic individuals (120 type 1 and 36 type 2) were analyzed using two parasitological methods...
2018: Journal of Diabetes Research
Joanne Lello, Susan J McClure, Kerri Tyrrell, Mark E Viney
It is normal for hosts to be co-infected by parasites. Interactions among co-infecting species can have profound consequences, including changing parasite transmission dynamics, altering disease severity and confounding attempts at parasite control. Despite the importance of co-infection, there is currently no way to predict how different parasite species may interact with one another, nor the consequences of those interactions. Here, we demonstrate a method that enables such prediction by identifying two nematode parasite groups based on taxonomy and characteristics of the parasitological niche...
March 14, 2018: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
Qiang Wang, Akram A Da'dara, Patrick J Skelly
BACKGROUND: Schistosomes are blood dwelling parasitic worms that cause the debilitating disease schistosomiasis. Here we examined the influence of the parasites on their external environment by monitoring the impact of adult Schistosoma mansoni worms on the murine plasma proteome in vitro and, in particular, on how the worms affect the blood coagulation protein high molecular weight kininogen (HK). METHODS: Following the incubation of adult schistosomes in murine plasma, two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) was conducted to look for changes in the plasma proteome compared with control plasma...
March 14, 2018: Parasites & Vectors
Sara Silva Pereira, Andrew P Jackson
BACKGROUND: Trypanosomatid parasites such as Trypanosoma spp. and Leishmania spp. are a major source of infectious disease in humans and domestic animals worldwide. Fundamental to the host-parasite interactions of these potent pathogens are their cell surfaces, which are highly decorated with glycosylated proteins and other macromolecules. Trypanosomatid genomes contain large multi-copy gene families encoding UDP-dependent glycosyltransferases (UGTs), the primary role of which is cell-surface decoration...
March 14, 2018: BMC Evolutionary Biology
Li Li, Bing Chen, Hongbin Yan, Yannan Zhao, Zhongzi Lou, Jianqiu Li, Baoquan Fu, Xingquan Zhu, Donald P McManus, Jianwu Dai, Wanzhong Jia
BACKGROUND: Hepatocyte-based metacestode culture is an attractive method to study alveolar echinococcosis (AE), but it is limited by the relatively short lifespan of cultured hepatocytes in maintaining their normal function. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe a three-dimensional (3D) hepatic culture system developed from co-cultured hepatocytes and mesenchymal stem cells using a collagen scaffold to study the development of Echinococcus multilocularis larvae...
March 14, 2018: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
O Alejadro Aleuy, Kathreen Ruckstuhl, Eric P Hoberg, Alasdair Veitch, Norman Simmons, Susan J Kutz
Gastrointestinal helminths can have a detrimental effect on the fitness of wild ungulates. Arctic and Subarctic ecosystems are ideal for the study of host-parasite interactions due to the comparatively simple ecological interactions and limited confounding factors. We used a unique dataset assembled in the early seventies to study the diversity of gastrointestinal helminths and their effect on fitness indicators of Dall's sheep, Ovis dalli dalli, in the Mackenzie Mountains, Northwest Territories, Canada. Parasite diversity included nine species, among which the abomasal nematode Marshallagia marshalli occurred with the highest prevalence and infection intensity...
2018: PloS One
M Anouk Goedknegt, David W Thieltges, Jaap van der Meer, K Mathias Wegner, Pieternella C Luttikhuizen
Despite their frequent occurrence and strong impacts on native biota, biological invasions can long remain undetected. One reason for this is that an invasive species can be morphologically similar to either native species or introduced species previously established in the same region, and thus be subject to mistaken identification. One recent case involves congeneric invasive parasites, copepods that now infect bivalve hosts along European Atlantic coasts, after having been introduced independently first from the Mediterranean Sea (Mytilicola intestinalis Steuer, 1902) and later from Japan (Mytilicola orientalis Mori, 1935)...
2018: PloS One
Sonia Altizer, Daniel J Becker, Jonathan H Epstein, Kristian M Forbes, Thomas R Gillespie, Richard J Hall, Dana M Hawley, Sonia M Hernandez, Lynn B Martin, Raina K Plowright, Dara A Satterfield, Daniel G Streicker
Human-provided resource subsidies for wildlife are diverse, common and have profound consequences for wildlife-pathogen interactions, as demonstrated by papers in this themed issue spanning empirical, theoretical and management perspectives from a range of study systems. Contributions cut across scales of organization, from the within-host dynamics of immune function, to population-level impacts on parasite transmission, to landscape- and regional-scale patterns of infection. In this concluding paper, we identify common threads and key findings from author contributions, including the consequences of resource subsidies for (i) host immunity; (ii) animal aggregation and contact rates; (iii) host movement and landscape-level infection patterns; and (iv) interspecific contacts and cross-species transmission...
May 5, 2018: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
David J Civitello, Brent E Allman, Connor Morozumi, Jason R Rohr
Anthropogenic resource supplementation can shape wildlife disease directly by altering the traits and densities of hosts and parasites or indirectly by stimulating prey, competitor or predator species. We first assess the direct epidemiological consequences of supplementation, highlighting the similarities and differences between food provisioning and two widespread forms of nutrient input: agricultural fertilization and aquatic nutrient enrichment. We then review an aquatic disease system and a general model to assess whether predator and competitor species can enhance or overturn the direct effects of enrichment...
May 5, 2018: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
Daniel T C Cox, Kevin J Gaston
Many human populations are undergoing an extinction of experience, with a progressive decline in interactions with nature. This is a consequence both of a loss of opportunity for, and orientation towards, such experiences. The trend is of concern in part because interactions with nature can be good for human health and wellbeing. One potential means of redressing these losses is through the intentional provision of resources to increase wildlife populations in close proximity to people, thereby increasing the potential for positive human-nature experiences, and thence the array of benefits that can result...
May 5, 2018: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"