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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28546380/respiratory-implications-of-pediatric-neuromuscular-disease
#1
Howard B Panitch
Children with progressive neuromuscular weakness undergo a stereotypical progression of respiratory involvement, beginning with impaired airway clearance and progressing to nocturnal and then diurnal ventilatory failure. This review examines issues related to airway clearance and mucus mobilization, sleep problems, and use of assisted ventilation in children with neuromuscular diseases. Interventions for each of these problems have been created or adapted for the pediatric population. The use of airway clearance therapies and assisted ventilation have improved survival of children with neuromuscular weakness...
June 2017: Respiratory Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28541747/evidence-based-utilization-of-non-invasive-ventilation-and-patient-outcomes
#2
Anuj B Mehta, Ivor S Douglas, Allan J Walkey
RATIONALE: Strong evidence supports use of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) for patients with respiratory distress from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and heart failure (strong evidence conditions). Despite unclear benefits of NIV for other causes of acute respiratory failure, utilization for conditions with weaker evidence is increasing despite evidence demonstrating higher mortality for patients who suffer NIV failure (progression from NIV to invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV)) compared to being treated initially with IMV...
May 25, 2017: Annals of the American Thoracic Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28531336/loop-gain-predicts-the-response-to-upper-airway-surgery-in-patients-with-obstructive-sleep-apnoea-ventilatory-control-abnormalities-predict-surgical-responsiveness
#3
Simon A Joosten, Paul Leong, Shane A Landry, Scott A Sands, Philip I Terrill, Dwayne Mann, Anthony Turton, Jhanavi Rangaswamy, Christopher Andara, Glen Burgess, Darren Mansfield, Garun S Hamilton, Bradley A Edwards
Study Objectives: Upper airway surgery is often recommended to treat OSA patients who cannot tolerate continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP). However, the response to surgery is variable, potentially because it does not improve the non-anatomical factors (i.e. loop gain and arousal threshold) causing OSA. Measuring these traits clinically might predict responses to surgery. Our primary objective was to test the value of loop gain and arousal threshold to predict surgical success defined as 50% reduction in apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and AHI <10 events/hr post-surgery...
May 22, 2017: Sleep
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28515334/central-acting-therapeutics-alleviate-respiratory-weakness-caused-by-heart-failure-induced-ventilatory-overdrive
#4
Andrew J Foster, Mathew J Platt, Jason S Huber, Ashley L Eadie, Alicia M Arkell, Nadya Romanova, David C Wright, Todd E Gillis, Coral L Murrant, Keith R Brunt, Jeremy A Simpson
Diaphragmatic weakness is a feature of heart failure (HF) associated with dyspnea and exertional fatigue. Most studies have focused on advanced stages of HF, leaving the cause unresolved. The long-standing theory is that pulmonary edema imposes a mechanical stress, resulting in diaphragmatic remodeling, but stable HF patients rarely exhibit pulmonary edema. We investigated how diaphragmatic weakness develops in two mouse models of pressure overload-induced HF. As in HF patients, both models had increased eupneic respiratory pressures and ventilatory drive...
May 17, 2017: Science Translational Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28506729/-the-role-of-extracorporeal-removal-of-co2-ecco2r-in-the-management-of-respiratory-diseases
#5
J L Diehl, J Boisramé-Helms, A Chardon-Couteau, M Commereuc, J-L Augy, A Sokoloff, N Rivet, P Gaussem, D M Smadja, N Aissaoui
INTRODUCTION: The aim of extracorporeal removal of CO2 (ECCO2R) is to ensure the removal of CO2 without any significant effect on oxygenation. ECCO2R makes use of low to moderate extracorporeal blood flow rates, whereas extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) requires high blood flows. STATE OF THE ART: For each ECCO2R device it is important to consider not only performance in terms of CO2 removal, but also cost and safety, including the incidence of hemolysis and of hemorrhagic and thrombotic complications...
May 12, 2017: Revue des Maladies Respiratoires
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28502521/-extracorporeal-life-support-in-thoracic-surgery-what-are-the-indications-and-the-pertinence
#6
REVIEW
J Reeb, A Olland, S Renaud, O Collange, X Delabranche, N Santelmo, F Meziani, P-M Mertes, G Massard, P-E Falcoz
INTRODUCTION: In thoracic surgery, extracorporeal life support (ECLS) technologies are used in cases of severe and refractory respiratory failure or as intraoperative cardiorespiratory support. The objectives of this review are to describe the rationale of ECLS techniques, to review the pulmonary diseases potentially treated by ECLS, and finally to demonstrate the efficacy of ECLS, using recently published data from the literature, in order to practice evidence based medicine. STATE OF THE ART: ECLS technologies should only be undertaken in expert centers...
May 12, 2017: Revue des Maladies Respiratoires
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28494170/why-high-intensity-nppv-is-favourable-to-low-intensity-nppv-clinical-and-physiological-reasons
#7
S B Schwarz, F S Magnet, W Windisch
High-intensity non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) was originally described for chronic hypercapnic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients in 2009, and refers to a specific ventilatory approach whereby NPPV settings are aimed at achieving the lowest arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) values possible. Thus, high-intensity NPPV requires ventilator settings to be increased in a stepwise approach to either an individually tolerated maximum, or to the levels necessary to achieve normocapnia...
May 11, 2017: COPD
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28492404/trend-and-outcomes-of-video-laryngoscope-use-across-picus
#8
Jocelyn R Grunwell, Pradip P Kamat, Michael Miksa, Ashwin Krishna, Karen Walson, Dennis Simon, Conrad Krawiec, Ryan Breuer, Jan Hau Lee, Eleanor Gradidge, Keiko Tarquinio, Asha Shenoi, Justine Shults, Vinay Nadkarni, Akira Nishisaki
OBJECTIVE: Video (indirect) laryngoscopy is used as a primary tracheal intubation device for difficult airways in emergency departments and in adult ICUs. The use and outcomes of video laryngoscopy compared with direct laryngoscopy has not been quantified in PICUs or cardiac ICUs. DESIGN: Retrospective review of prospectively collected observational data from a multicenter tracheal intubation database (National Emergency Airway Registry for Children) from July 2010 to June 2015...
May 10, 2017: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28492122/critical-care-admission-of-south-african-sa-surgical-patients-results-of-the-sa-surgical-outcomes-study
#9
David Lee Skinner, Kim De Vasconcellos, Robert Wise, Tonya Marianne Esterhuizen, Cate Fourie, Akhter Goolam Mahomed, P Dean Gopalan, Ivan Joubert, Hyla-Louise Kluyts, L Rudo Mathivha, Busisiwe Mrara, Jan P Pretorius, Guy Richards, Ollie Smith, Maryke Geertruida Louise Spruyt, Rupert M Pearse, Thandinkosi E Madiba, Bruce M Biccard, On Behalf Of The South African Surgical Outcomes Study Sasos Investigators
BACKGROUND: Appropriate critical care admissions are an important component of surgical care. However, there are few data describing postoperative critical care admission in resource-limited low- and middle-income countries. OBJECTIVE: To describe the demographics, organ failures, organ support and outcomes of non-cardiac surgical patients admitted to critical care units in South Africa (SA). METHODS: The SA Surgical Outcomes Study (SASOS) was a 7-day national, multicentre, prospective, observational cohort study of all patients ≥16 years of age undergoing inpatient non-cardiac surgery between 19 and 26 May 2014 at 50 government-funded hospitals...
April 25, 2017: South African Medical Journal, Suid-Afrikaanse Tydskrif Vir Geneeskunde
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28492119/paraquat-poisoning-acute-lung-injury-a-missed-diagnosis
#10
Sipho D Ntshalintshali, Thandekile C Manzini
Paraquat is a herbicide of great toxicological importance because it is associated with high mortality rates, mainly due to respiratory failure. We report the case of a 28-year-old man admitted to the casualty department at Ngwelezana Hospital, Empangeni, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, with a history of vomiting and abdominal pain after ingestion of ~100 mL of an unknown substance, later identified as paraquat, together with an unknown amount of alcohol, in a suicide attempt. He developed respiratory distress associated with lung parenchymal infiltrates that required ventilatory support and later a spontaneous pneumothorax, and died in the intensive care unit...
April 25, 2017: South African Medical Journal, Suid-Afrikaanse Tydskrif Vir Geneeskunde
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28487387/different-determinants-of-ventilatory-inefficiency-at-different-stages-of-reduced-ejection-fraction-chronic-heart-failure-natural-history
#11
Alessandro Mezzani, Andrea Giordano, Klara Komici, Ugo Corrà
BACKGROUND: It is not known whether determinants of ventilation (VE)/volume of exhaled carbon dioxide (VCO2) slope during incremental exercise may differ at different stages of reduced ejection fraction chronic heart failure natural history. METHODS AND RESULTS: VE/VCO2 slope was fitted up to lowest VE/VCO2 ratio, that is, a proxy of the VE/perfusion ratio devoid of nonmetabolic stimuli to ventilatory drive. VE/VCO2 slope tertiles were generated from our database (<27...
May 9, 2017: Journal of the American Heart Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28485989/non-invasive-positive-airway-pressure-in-obesity-hypoventilation-syndrome-and-chronic-obstructive-pulmonary-disease-present-and-future-perspectives
#12
Victor R Ramírez-Molina, Francisco J Gómez-de-Terreros, Javier Barca-Durán, Juan F Masa
Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) is a sleep disorder that has acquired great importance worldwide because of its prevalence and association with obesity leading to increased morbidity and mortality with reduced quality of life. The primary feature is insufficient sleep-related ventilation, resulting in abnormally elevated arterial carbon dioxide pressure (PaCO2) during sleep and demonstration of daytime hypoventilation. There are three main mechanisms that can generate diurnal hypoventilation in obese patients: alteration of the respiratory mechanics secondary to obesity; central hypoventilation secondary to leptin resistance and sleep disorder with sleep hypoventilation and obstructive apnoeas, which can be potentially solved with the use of positive airway pressure: non-invasive ventilation (NIV) and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)...
May 9, 2017: COPD
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28485522/effects-of-1-month-withdrawal-of-ventilatory-support-in-hypercapnic-myotonic-dystrophy-type-1
#13
Fergal J O'Donoghue, Jean-Christian Borel, Yves Dauvilliers, Patrick Levy, Renaud Tamisier, Jean-Louis Pépin
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The benefits of domiciliary non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) are unclear. We sought to determine the effects of elective discontinuation of ventilatory support for 1 month in DM1 patients receiving NIV for chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure. METHODS: At baseline, 12 patients underwent polysomnography, and assessment of subjective (Epworth Sleepiness Scale) and objective (Oxford Sleep Resistance Test) sleepiness, fatigue (Fatigue Severity Scale), respiratory function including muscle strength, arterial blood gas (ABG), hypercapnic ventilatory response (HCVR), Blood Pressure, peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT) and pulse wave velocity (PWV)...
May 9, 2017: Respirology: Official Journal of the Asian Pacific Society of Respirology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28476919/v%C3%AC-o2-kinetics-associated-with-moderate-intensity-exercise-in-heart-failure-impact-of-intrathecal-fentanyl-inhibition-of-group-iii-iv-locomotor-muscle-afferents
#14
Erik H Van Iterson, Bruce D Johnson, Michael J Joyner, Timothy B Curry, Thomas P Olson
Heart failure (HF) patients demonstrate impaired pulmonary, circulatory, and nervous system responses to exercise. While HF demonstrate prolonged (time-constant, τ) pulmonary oxygen uptake (V̇O2) on-kinetics contributing to exercise intolerance, it is unknown if abnormal V̇O2 kinetics couple with ventilatory and circulatory dysfunction secondary to impaired group III/IV afferents in HF. Because lower-lumbar intrathecal fentanyl inhibits locomotor muscle afferents resulting in improved exercise ventilation and hemodynamics, we tested the hypotheses, HF will demonstrate: 1) rapid V̇O2 on-kinetics, and 2) attenuated steady-state V̇O2 amplitude and oxygen deficit (O2def) during exercise with fentanyl versus placebo...
May 5, 2017: American Journal of Physiology. Heart and Circulatory Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28475816/interleukin-1-blockade-in-heart-failure-with-preserved-ejection-fraction-rationale-and-design-of-the-diastolic-heart-failure-anakinra-response-trial-2-d-hart2
#15
Benjamin W Van Tassell, Leo F Buckley, Salvatore Carbone, Cory R Trankle, Justin M Canada, Dave L Dixon, Nayef Abouzaki, Claudia Oddi-Erdle, Giuseppe Biondi-Zoccai, Ross Arena, Antonio Abbate
Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) now accounts for the majority of confirmed HF cases in the United States. However, there are no highly effective evidence-based treatments currently available for these patients. Inflammation correlates positively with adverse outcomes in HF patients. Interleukin (IL)-1, a prototypical inflammatory cytokine, has been implicated as a driver of diastolic dysfunction in preclinical animal models and a pilot clinical trial. The Diastolic Heart Failure Anakinra Response Trial 2 (D-HART2) is a phase 2, 2:1 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial that will test the hypothesis that IL-1 blockade with anakinra (recombinant human IL-1 receptor antagonist) improves (1) cardiorespiratory fitness, (2) objective evidence of diastolic dysfunction, and (3) elevated inflammation in patients with HFpEF (http://www...
May 5, 2017: Clinical Cardiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28472876/effect-of-inhaled-nitric-oxide-on-oxygen-therapy-mechanical-ventilation-and-hypoxic-respiratory-failure
#16
Dan L Stewart, Paul A Vogel, Brant Jarrett, Jim Potenziano
To assess the role of inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) in reducing the need for oxygen therapy, decreasing time on mechanical ventilatory support, and attenuating probability of hypoxic respiratory failure severity progression, we reviewed published reports of phase III iNO studies in neonates with hypoxic respiratory failure and pulmonary hypertension, as well as a novel post hoc analysis of data from the Clinical Inhaled Nitric Oxide Research Group Initiative (CINRGI) study population not been previously reported...
May 4, 2017: Minerva Pediatrica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28459325/ajrccm-100-year-anniversary-homeward-bound-a-centenary-of-home-mechanical-ventilation
#17
Matthew Hind, Michael I Polkey, Anita K Simonds
The evolution of home mechanical ventilation is an intertwined chronicle of negative and positive pressure modes and their role in managing ventilatory failure in neuromuscular diseases and other chronic disorders. The uptake of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation has resulted in widespread growth in home ventilation internationally and fewer patients being ventilated invasively. As with many applications of domiciliary medical technology, home ventilatory support has either led or run in parallel with acute hospital applications and has been influenced by medical and societal shifts in the approach to chronic care, the creation of community support teams, a preference of recipients to be treated at home, and economic imperatives...
May 1, 2017: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28452241/respiratory-monitoring-in-adult-intensive-care-unit
#18
Pongdhep Theerawit, Yuda Sutherasan, Lorenzo Ball, Paolo Pelosi
The mortality of patients with respiratory failure has steadily decreased with the advancements in protective ventilation and treatment options. Although respiratory monitoring per se has not been proven to affect the mortality of critically ill patients, it plays a crucial role in patients' care, as it helps to titrate the ventilatory support. Several new monitoring techniques have recently been made available at the bedside. The goals of monitoring comprise alerting physicians to detect the change in the patients' conditions, to improve the understanding of pathophysiology to guide the diagnosis and provide cost-effective clinical management...
May 10, 2017: Expert Review of Respiratory Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28443680/periodic-breathing-during-incremental-exercise
#19
Piergiuseppe Agostoni, Ugo Corrà, Michele Emdin
Periodic breathing during incremental cardiopulmonary exercise testing is a regularly recurring waxing and waning of tidal volume due to oscillations in central respiratory drive. Periodic breathing is a sign of respiratory control system instability, which may occur at rest or during exercise. The possible mechanisms responsible of exertional periodic breathing might be related to any instability of the ventilatory regulation caused by: 1) increased circulatory delay (i.e., circulation time from the lung to the brain and chemoreceptors, due to reduced cardiac index leading to delay in information transfer), 2) increase in controller gain (i...
April 26, 2017: Annals of the American Thoracic Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28428488/improvement-in-exercise-capacity-by-exercise-training-associated-with-favorable-clinical-outcomes-in-advanced-heart-failure-with-high-b-type-natriuretic-peptide-level
#20
Michio Nakanishi, Kazuhiro Nakao, Leon Kumasaka, Tetsuo Arakawa, Shigefumi Fukui, Takahiro Ohara, Masanobu Yanase, Teruo Noguchi, Satoshi Yasuda, Yoichi Goto
BACKGROUND: The efficacy of exercise training (ET) programs and its relationship with long-term clinical outcomes in advanced heart failure (HF) patients with high levels of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) remain uncertain.Methods and Results:We studied 340 consecutive HF patients with ejection fraction (EF) <45% who completed a 3-month ET program. Patients with BNP ≥200 pg/mL (High-BNP, n=170) had more advanced HF characteristics, including lower EF (25.0±8.6% vs. 28.1±8...
April 20, 2017: Circulation Journal: Official Journal of the Japanese Circulation Society
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