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Special Care Nursery

Charlene Eliza Thornton, Hannah Grace Dahlen
OBJECTIVES: To determine incidence, associated factors, outcomes and geographical occurrence of born before arrival (BBA) in New South Wales, Australia. DESIGN: A linked population data study involving population-based surveillance systems was undertaken for the years 2000-2011. SETTING: New South Wales, Australia. PARTICIPANTS: All women who underwent BBA compared with women who birthed in hospital/birth centre settings...
March 14, 2018: BMJ Open
Kassam Mahomed, Kellie Wild, Christopher R Weekes
BACKGROUND: Pre-labour rupture of membranes (PROM) at term is a common event with early induction of labour reducing infectious morbidity without increasing the caesarean rate. Syntocinon is commonly used for induction but prostaglandins are also routinely used. Large studies have shown no difference in the maternal and neonatal outcomes with either method. AIM: To assess the safety and efficacy of vaginal prostaglandin (PG) compared to syntocinon for induction of labour in term-PROM...
February 22, 2018: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology
Kate Cheney, Rachel Farber, Alexandra L Barratt, Kevin McGeechan, Bradley de Vries, Robert Ogle, Kirsten I Black
OBJECTIVE: To examine the prevalence across 25 years of overweight and obesity among nulliparous Australian women during early pregnancy; to estimate the proportions of adverse perinatal outcomes attributable to overweight and obesity in this population. DESIGN: Cohort study; retrospective analysis of electronic maternity data. Setting, participants: 42 582 nulliparous women with singleton pregnancies giving birth at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, an urban teaching hospital in Sydney, January 1990 - December 2014...
February 19, 2018: Medical Journal of Australia
Johanna Quist-Nelson, Annemijn A de Ruigh, Anna Lene Seidler, David P van der Ham, Christine Willekes, Vincenzo Berghella, Eva Pajkrt, Jillian Patterson, David Espinoza, Jonathan Morris, Ben Mol, Lisa Askie
OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of immediate delivery an expectant management among women whose pregnancies were complicated by preterm prelabor rupture of membranes (PROM) in the late preterm period (from 34 0/7 weeks until 36 6/7 weeks of gestation). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Scopus,, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched from inception until December 2016. METHODS OF STUDY SELECTION: We included all randomized controlled trials with individual participant data reporting on late preterm PROM with randomization to immediate delivery or expectant management...
February 2018: Obstetrics and Gynecology
Ha-Na Kang, Hyun Kyung Park, Hyun-Ju Lee, Jin-Hwa Moon, Jae Won Oh, Chang-Ryul Kim
BACKGROUND: Fever rather than diarrhea or vomiting was the most common symptom of neonatal rotavirus(RV) infection in our previous study. We investigated if RV infection is a major cause of neonatal fever and we compared the clinical characteristics of bacterial infections, viral infections and unknown causes of neonatal fever. METHOD: We reviewed the electronic medical records of 48 newborns of ≤ 28 days who were admitted to the Special Care Nursery of Hanyang University Guri Hospital for fever (≥ 38°C) from 2005 to 2009...
December 31, 2017: Pediatrics International: Official Journal of the Japan Pediatric Society
Eun-Hye Yoo, Dasom Chun, Mi Ju Kim, Hyun-Hwa Cha, Won Joon Seong
OBJECTIVE: To determine whether late preterm twin neonates have a more favorable perinatal outcome than singleton late preterm neonates. METHODS: We studied 401 late preterm births between 34+0 and 36+6 weeks of gestation, from January 2011 to December 2014 in our institution. We compared the maternal and neonatal characteristics and perinatal outcomes between singleton and twin pregnancies. Perinatal outcomes included Apgar score, admission to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) or special care nursery, duration of NICU stay, and the rate of composite morbidity (antibiotic use, hypoglycemia, hypocalcemia, hyperbilirubinemia requiring phototherapy, respiratory support, and respiratory distress syndrome)...
September 2017: Obstetrics & Gynecology Science
Jessica A Marathe, Wei How Lim, Michael P Metz, Wendy Scheil, Gustaaf A Dekker, William M Hague
OBJECTIVE: To review the management and outcomes of Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy (ICP) in South Australia (SA) over the past decade. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort review. SETTING: Public clinics at two teaching hospitals in SA. POPULATION: All pregnancies associated with ICP (defined as pruritus with serum bile acids≥10μmol/L) managed 2001-2010. METHODS: Identification of subjects (laboratory database), detailed chart-review to ascertain demographics, maternal/perinatal outcomes and associated pregnancy comorbidities, analysis of mild/severe disease cohorts, comparison with normal population data, using Student's t-test or Mann-Whitney U test as appropriate for continuous variables, and Pearson's chi-square test or Fisher's exact test for categorical variables...
November 2017: European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology
Marilyn Morris, John W Bolnga, Ovoi Verave, Jimmy Aipit, Allanie Rero, Moses Laman
BACKGROUND: Oral misoprostol as an induction of labour (IOL) agent is rapidly gaining popularity in resource-limited settings because it is cheap, stable at ambient temperatures, and logistically easier to administer compared to dinoprostone and oxytocin. We aim to investigate the safety and effectiveness of a regimen of oral misoprostol in Papua New Guinean women undergoing IOL. METHODS: As part of a prospective dose escalation study conducted at Modilon Hospital in Papua New Guinea, women with a singleton pregnancy in cephalic presentation and an unfavourable cervix who gave written informed consent were administered oral misoprostol, commencing at 25mcg once every 2 h for 4 doses and increased to 50mcg once every 2 h for 8 doses within 24 h...
September 8, 2017: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
Hisae Tabata
The purpose of this study was to elucidate the involvement of kindergarten and nursery school teachers with young children with congenital heart disease. The study was designed as a qualitative descriptive study. Interviews of kindergarten and nursery school teachers with experience in the care and education of young children with congenital heart disease were conducted, during which they described their experience. Verbatim transcripts of the interviews were prepared, and the content was categorized. The study participants were 11 kindergarten and nursery school teachers...
September 2017: Comprehensive Child and Adolescent Nursing
Jason P Bentley, Natasha Nassar, Maree Porter, Michelle de Vroome, Elizabeth Yip, Amanda J Ampt
BACKGROUND: Among women who intend to exclusively breastfeed, it is important to identify mothers and their infants who have a greater risk of formula supplementation in hospital, and are unlikely to recover exclusive breastfeeding at discharge. We investigated factors associated with in-hospital formula feeding among healthy term infants born to women who intended to exclusively breastfeed, and among this group, predictors of infant feeding at discharge. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study utilizing routinely collected clinical data for women who intended to exclusively breastfeed and gave birth to healthy term infants in five hospitals in New South Wales, Australia, 2010-2013...
December 2017: Birth
Shelby T Rentmeester, Johanna Pringle, Carol R Hogue
Objectives Each year in the U.S., approximately 7200 infants are born with a critical congenital heart defect (CCHD). The Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) mandated routine screening for CCHD starting January 2015. The current study evaluated hospital performance of the mandated CCHD screenings in Georgia. Methods Utilizing the DPH newborn screening surveillance system, data from 6 months before and after the mandate were analyzed for reports submitted and positive CCHD screening results. Chi square tests of independence were performed to examine the association between reporting of results for CCHD screening after the mandate and hospital nursery level [level I (well-baby/newborn); level II (special care); level III (neonatal intensive care unit-NICU)] and NICU submissions...
November 2017: Maternal and Child Health Journal
Meghan A Bohren, G Justus Hofmeyr, Carol Sakala, Rieko K Fukuzawa, Anna Cuthbert
BACKGROUND: Historically, women have generally been attended and supported by other women during labour. However, in hospitals worldwide, continuous support during labour has often become the exception rather than the routine. OBJECTIVES: The primary objective was to assess the effects, on women and their babies, of continuous, one-to-one intrapartum support compared with usual care, in any setting. Secondary objectives were to determine whether the effects of continuous support are influenced by:1...
July 6, 2017: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Brett J Manley, Calum T Roberts, Gaston R B Arnolda, Ian M R Wright, Louise S Owen, Kim M Dalziel, Jann P Foster, Peter G Davis, Adam G Buckmaster
INTRODUCTION: Nasal high-flow (nHF) therapy is a popular mode of respiratory support for newborn infants. Evidence for nHF use is predominantly from neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). There are no randomised trials of nHF use in non-tertiary special care nurseries (SCNs). We hypothesise that nHF is non-inferior to nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) as primary support for newborn infants with respiratory distress, in the population cared for in non-tertiary SCNs. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The HUNTER trial is an unblinded Australian multicentre, randomised, non-inferiority trial...
June 23, 2017: BMJ Open
Sarah T Mitchell, Tracy J Costello, Kara M Nedderman
OBJECTIVE: To compare time to first dose of oral morphine used in the treatment of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) versus a special care nursery (SCN) setting. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was completed of patient data from two community hospitals in a single health network. Infants born at either facility between January 2013 and August 2015 were eligible for inclusion in the study if treated for NAS with a course of oral morphine...
May 13, 2017: Pharmacotherapy
Gregory E Miller, Jennifer Culhane, William Grobman, Hyagriv Simhan, Douglas E Williamson, Emma K Adam, Claudia Buss, Sonja Entringer, Kwang-Youn Kim, J Felipe Garcia-Espana, Lauren Keenan-Devlin, Thomas W McDade, Pathik D Wadhwa, Ann Borders
Research suggests the health consequences of economic hardship can be transmitted across generations. Some of these disparities are thought to be passed to offspring during gestation. But this hypothesis has not been tested in contemporary American samples, and the mechanisms of transmission have not been characterized. Accordingly, this study had two goals: first, to determine if women exposed to economic hardship during childhood showed higher rates of adverse birth outcomes; and second, to evaluate the contribution of inflammation, psychosocial, lifestyle, and obstetric characteristics to this phenomenon...
October 2017: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
Shannon E Perry
A premature newborn was first transported via helicopter from place of birth to a specialty nursery 50 years ago. Since that time, the care of high-risk and premature newborns has evolved, but specialized services are not always available at the birth site. As a result, the demand for newborn transfer continues to grow. Today, neonates are transported to tertiary centers via ground ambulances, helicopters, and airplanes by highly trained personnel using sophisticated incubators and equipment.
April 23, 2017: Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, and Neonatal Nursing: JOGNN
Jacqueline Frayne, Thinh Nguyen, Kellie Bennett, Suzanna Allen, Yvonne Hauck, Helena Liira
BACKGROUND: Psychotropic medication use occurs in 8% of pregnancies, with rates increasing, and often multiple medications prescribed. AIMS: This study aims to determine if the use of psychotropic medication, in a cohort of women with severe mental illness, increases rates of special care nursery admission and reports differences between antidepressant and antipsychotic medication use either alone or in combination. METHODS: A retrospective database analysis from a cohort with severe mental illness in pregnancy identified 268 pregnant women who were grouped according to medication type...
October 2017: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology
E B Carter, K Barbier, R Sarabia, G A Macones, A G Cahill, M G Tuuli
OBJECTIVE: Group prenatal care (GC) models are receiving increasing attention as a means of preventing preterm birth; yet, there are limited data on whether group care improves perinatal outcomes in women who deliver at term. The purpose of this study was to evaluate our institutional experience with GC over the past decade and test the hypothesis that GC, compared with traditional individual care (TC), improves perinatal outcomes in women who deliver at term. STUDY DESIGN: We performed a retrospective cohort study of women delivering at term who participated in GC compared with TC...
July 2017: Journal of Perinatology: Official Journal of the California Perinatal Association
Leesa G Allinson, Lex W Doyle, Linda Denehy, Alicia J Spittle
AIMS: The primary aim of this study was to establish how many neonatal nurseries in Australia and New Zealand had a neurodevelopmental allied health team, to ascertain the disciplines involved, their qualifications and experience. The secondary aim was to evaluate which standardised neurobehavioural/neurological assessments were currently being implemented, and the existing practice in relation to their use. METHODS: A descriptive cross-sectional survey, sampling 179 eligible public and private hospital neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and special care nurseries (SCNs) throughout Australia and New Zealand, was purpose-developed and administered electronically from the 5th April to 23rd July 2013...
March 23, 2017: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health
Amy R Monk, Celia P Grigg, Maralyn Foureur, Mark Tracy, Sally K Tracy
BACKGROUND: the viability of freestanding midwifery units in Australia is restricted, due to concerns over their safety, particularly for women and babies who, require transfer. AIM: to compare the maternal and neonatal birth outcomes of women who planned, to give birth at freestanding midwifery units and subsequently, transferred to a tertiary maternity unit to the maternal and neonatal, outcomes of a low-risk cohort of women who planned to give birth in, tertiary maternity unit...
March 2017: Midwifery
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