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Drosophila epigenetics

Na Xu, Xingwu Lu, Harsh Kavi, Alexander V Emelyanov, Travis J Bernardo, Elena Vershilova, Arthur I Skoultchi, Dmitry V Fyodorov
Metazoan linker histones are essential for development and play crucial roles in organization of chromatin, modification of epigenetic states and regulation of genetic activity. Vertebrates express multiple linker histone H1 isoforms, which may function redundantly. In contrast, H1 isoforms are not present in Dipterans, including D. melanogaster, except for an embryo-specific, distantly related dBigH1. Here we show that Drosophila BEN domain protein Elba2, which is expressed in early embryos and was hypothesized to have insulator-specific functions, can compensate for the loss of H1 in vivo...
September 30, 2016: Scientific Reports
Krzysztof Jagla, Benoit Kalman, Thomas Boudou, Sylvie Hénon, Sabrina Batonnet-Pichon
The use of the adapted models to decipher patho-physiological mechanisms of human diseases is always a great challenge. This is of particular importance for early-onset myopathies, in which pathological mutations often impact not only on muscle structure and function but also on developmental processes. Mice are currently the main animal model used to study neuromuscular disorders including the early-onset myopathies. However strategies based on simple animal models and on transdisciplinary approaches exploring mechanical muscle cell properties emerge as attractive, non-exclusive alternatives...
September 23, 2016: Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology
Federica Marasca, Fabrizia Marullo, Chiara Lanzuolo
Epigenetic mechanisms modulate and maintain the transcriptional state of the genome acting at various levels on chromatin. Emerging findings suggest that the position in the nuclear space and the cross talk between components of the nuclear architecture play a role in the regulation of epigenetic signatures. We recently described a cross talk between the Polycomb group of proteins (PcG) epigenetic repressors and the nuclear lamina. This interplay is important for the maintenance of transcriptional repression at muscle-specific genes and for the correct timing of muscle differentiation...
2016: Methods in Molecular Biology
Lo Sardo Federica
In higher eucaryotes, not all the genome is replicated simultaneously: there are parts of the genome that replicate at the beginning of S-phase (early S-phase), others that are replicated later. In each cell, early replicating genomic regions are alternated to late-replicating regions. In general, eucaryotic genomes are organized into structural domains where genes showing the same epigenetic state replicate at the same time.Here, we will describe the protocol that we routinely used for the analysis of replication timing of specific loci in Drosophila embryonic cell lines (S2 and S3) based on BrdU labeling and FACS sorting of different S-phase fractions (early, mid, late) of asynchronous cycling cells...
2016: Methods in Molecular Biology
Sahil Sharma, Fabian Poetz, Marius Bruer, Thi Bach Nga Ly-Hartig, Johanna Schott, Bertrand Séraphin, Georg Stoecklin
Acetylation of histones and transcription-related factors is known to exert epigenetic and transcriptional control of gene expression. Here we report that histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) also regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level by controlling poly(A) RNA stability. Inhibition of HDAC1 and HDAC2 induces massive and widespread degradation of normally stable poly(A) RNA in mammalian and Drosophila cells. Acetylation-induced RNA decay depends on the HATs p300 and CBP, which acetylate the exoribonuclease CAF1a, a catalytic subunit of the CCR4-CAF1-NOT deadenlyase complex and thereby contribute to accelerating poly(A) RNA degradation...
September 15, 2016: Molecular Cell
Youqiong Ye, Liang Gu, Xiaolong Chen, Jiejun Shi, Xiaobai Zhang, Cizhong Jiang
Chromatin remodeling plays a critical role in gene regulation and impacts many biological processes. However, little is known about the relationship between chromatin remodeling dynamics and in vivo cell lineage commitment. Here, we reveal the patterns of histone modification change and nucleosome positioning dynamics and their epigenetic regulatory roles during the in vivo glial differentiation in early Drosophila embryos. The genome-wide average H3K9ac signals in promoter regions are decreased in the glial cells compared to the neural progenitor cells...
2016: Scientific Reports
S V Satya Prakash Avva, Craig M Hart
Data implicate the Drosophila 32 kDa Boundary Element-Associated Factors BEAF-32A and BEAF-32B in both chromatin domain insulator element function and promoter function. They might also function as an epigenetic memory by remaining bound to mitotic chromosomes. Both proteins are made from the same gene. They differ in their N-terminal 80 amino acids, which contain single DNA-binding BED fingers. The remaining 200 amino acids are identical in the two proteins. The structure and function of the middle region of 120 amino acids is unknown, while the C-terminal region of 80 amino acids has a putative leucine zipper and a BESS domain and mediates BEAF-BEAF interactions...
2016: PloS One
Jason G Wood, Brian C Jones, Nan Jiang, Chengyi Chang, Suzanne Hosier, Priyan Wickremesinghe, Meyrolin Garcia, Davis A Hartnett, Lucas Burhenn, Nicola Neretti, Stephen L Helfand
Transposable elements (TEs) are mobile genetic elements, highly enriched in heterochromatin, that constitute a large percentage of the DNA content of eukaryotic genomes. Aging in Drosophila melanogaster is characterized by loss of repressive heterochromatin structure and loss of silencing of reporter genes in constitutive heterochromatin regions. Using next-generation sequencing, we found that transcripts of many genes native to heterochromatic regions and TEs increased with age in fly heads and fat bodies...
October 4, 2016: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Patrick Verrando, Maria Capovilla, Roger Rahmani
Epidemiological association studies have revealed a role for pesticides in cancer occurrence, while a growing number of reports have highlighted the deleterious epigenetic modifications that can be produced by environmental factors. However, epidemiological data currently lack molecular support to unravel the epigenetic impact of pesticides on carcinogenesis. Based on epidemiological studies of melanoma, our data show for the first time that trans-nonachlor (TNC), a component of the pesticide chlordane, modulates the microRNA miR-141-3p in human melanocytic cells in vitro, with effects on melanomagenesis parameters...
August 10, 2016: Toxicology
Elysse M Craddock
BACKGROUND: Species-rich adaptive radiations arising from rare plant and animal colonizers are common on remote volcanic archipelagoes. However, they present a paradox. The severe genetic bottleneck of founder events and effects of inbreeding depression, coupled with the inherently stressful volcanic environment, would seem to predict reduced evolutionary potential and increased risk of extinction, rather than rapid adaptive divergence and speciation. Significantly, eukaryotic genomes harbor many families of transposable elements (TEs) that are mobilized by genome shock; these elements may be the primary drivers of genetic reorganization and speciation on volcanic islands...
2016: Biology Direct
Kevin A Hope, Mark S LeDoux, Lawrence T Reiter
In mammals, expression of UBE3A is epigenetically regulated in neurons and expression is restricted to the maternal copy of UBE3A. A recent report claimed that Drosophila melanogaster UBE3A homolog (Dube3a) is preferentially expressed from the maternal allele in fly brain, inferring an imprinting mechanism. However, complex epigenetic regulatory features of the mammalian imprinting center are not present in Drosophila, and allele specific expression of Dube3a has not been documented. We used behavioral and electrophysiological analysis of the Dube3a loss-of-function allele (Dube3a(15b)) to investigate Dube3a imprinting in fly neurons...
August 11, 2016: Epigenetics: Official Journal of the DNA Methylation Society
Lin Ding, Mohamad El Zaatari, Juanita L Merchant
This review focuses on the various experimental models to study gastric cancer pathogenesis, with the role of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) used as the major examples. We review differences in human stomach anatomy compared to the stomachs of the experimental models, including the mouse and invertebrate models such as Drosophila and C. elegans. The contribution of major signaling pathways, e.g., Notch, Hedgehog, AKT/PI3K is discussed in the context of their potential contribution to foregut tumorigenesis...
2016: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Jennifer M I Daenzer, Patricia P Jumbo-Lucioni, Marquise L Hopson, Kerry R Garza, Emily L Ryan, Judith L Fridovich-Keil
Classic galactosemia (CG) is a potentially lethal inborn error of metabolism that results from profound loss of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT), the second enzyme in the Leloir pathway of galactose metabolism. Neonatal detection and dietary restriction of galactose minimize or resolve the acute sequelae of CG, but fail to prevent the long-term complications experienced by a majority of patients. One of the substrates of GALT, galactose-1-phosphate (Gal-1P), accumulates to high levels in affected infants, especially following milk exposure, and has been proposed as the key mediator of acute and long-term pathophysiology in CG...
August 24, 2016: Disease Models & Mechanisms
Eric P Ratliff, Ayeh Barekat, Marta M Lipinski, Kim D Finley
Drosophila models have been successfully used to identify many genetic components that affect neurodegenerative disorders. Recently, there has been a growing interest in identifying innate and environmental factors that influence the individual outcomes following traumatic brain injury (TBI). This includes both severe TBI and more subtle, mild TBI (mTBI), which is common in people playing contact sports. Autophagy, as a clearance pathway, exerts protective effects in multiple neurological disease models. In a recent publication, we highlighted the development of a novel repetitive mTBI system using Drosophila, which recapitulates several phenotypes associated with trauma in mammalian models...
August 25, 2016: Autophagy
Tatyana G Kahn, Eshagh Dorafshan, Dorothea Schultheis, Aman Zare, Per Stenberg, Ingolf Reim, Vincenzo Pirrotta, Yuri B Schwartz
Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins are epigenetic repressors essential for control of development and cell differentiation. They form multiple complexes of which PRC1 and PRC2 are evolutionary conserved and obligatory for repression. The targeting of PRC1 and PRC2 is poorly understood and was proposed to be hierarchical and involve tri-methylation of histone H3 (H3K27me3) and/or monoubiquitylation of histone H2A (H2AK118ub). Here, we present a strict test of this hypothesis using the Drosophila model. We discover that neither H3K27me3 nor H2AK118ub is required for targeting PRC complexes to Polycomb Response Elements (PREs)...
August 23, 2016: Nucleic Acids Research
Maria Derkacheva, Shujing Liu, Duarte D Figueiredo, Matthew Gentry, Iva Mozgova, Paolo Nanni, Min Tang, Mattias Mannervik, Claudia Köhler, Lars Hennig
Polycomb group (PcG) proteins form an epigenetic memory system in plants and animals, but interacting proteins are poorly known in plants. Here, we have identified Arabidopsis UBIQUITIN SPECIFIC PROTEASES (USP; UBP in plant and yeasts) 12 and 13 as partners of the plant-specific PcG protein LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN 1 (LHP1). UBP12 binds to chromatin of PcG target genes and is required for histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation and repression of a subset of PcG target genes. Plants lacking UBP12 and UBP13 developed autonomous endosperm in the absence of fertilization...
2016: Nature Plants
Joel M Swenson, Serafin U Colmenares, Amy R Strom, Sylvain V Costes, Gary H Karpen
Heterochromatin is enriched for specific epigenetic factors including Heterochromatin Protein 1a (HP1a), and is essential for many organismal functions. To elucidate heterochromatin organization and regulation, we purified Drosophila melanogaster HP1a interactors, and performed a genome-wide RNAi screen to identify genes that impact HP1a levels or localization. The majority of the over four hundred putative HP1a interactors and regulators identified were previously unknown. We found that 13 of 16 tested candidates (83%) are required for gene silencing, providing a substantial increase in the number of identified components that impact heterochromatin properties...
2016: ELife
Ruggiero Caizzi, Roberta Moschetti, Lucia Piacentini, Laura Fanti, Renè Massimiliano Marsano, Patrizio Dimitri
The term heterochromatin has been long considered synonymous with gene silencing, but it is now clear that the presence of transcribed genes embedded in pericentromeric heterochromatin is a conserved feature in the evolution of eukaryotic genomes. Several studies have addressed the epigenetic changes that enable the expression of genes in pericentric heterochromatin, yet little is known about the evolutionary processes through which this has occurred. By combining genome annotation analysis and high-resolution cytology, we have identified and mapped 53 orthologs of D...
August 2016: PLoS Genetics
Paulo Navarro-Costa, Alicia McCarthy, Pedro Prudêncio, Christina Greer, Leonardo G Guilgur, Jörg D Becker, Julie Secombe, Prashanth Rangan, Rui G Martinho
Oocytes are arrested for long periods of time in the prophase of the first meiotic division (prophase I). As chromosome condensation poses significant constraints to gene expression, the mechanisms regulating transcriptional activity in the prophase I-arrested oocyte are still not entirely understood. We hypothesized that gene expression during the prophase I arrest is primarily epigenetically regulated. Here we comprehensively define the Drosophila female germ line epigenome throughout oogenesis and show that the oocyte has a unique, dynamic and remarkably diversified epigenome characterized by the presence of both euchromatic and heterochromatic marks...
2016: Nature Communications
Andrew B Adrian, Johnny Cruz Corchado, Josep M Comeron
In all eukaryotic species examined, meiotic recombination, and crossovers in particular, occur non-randomly along chromosomes. The cause for this non-random distribution remains poorly understood but some specific DNA sequence motifs have been shown to be enriched near crossover hotspots in a number of species. We present analyses using machine learning algorithms to investigate whether DNA motif distribution across the genome can be used to predict crossover variation in Drosophila melanogaster, a species without hotspots...
2016: Genome Biology and Evolution
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