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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29677102/implications-of-pi3k-akt-pten-signaling-on-superoxide-dismutases-expression-and-in-the-pathogenesis-of-alzheimer-s-disease
#1
REVIEW
Satoru Matsuda, Yukie Nakagawa, Ai Tsuji, Yasuko Kitagishi, Atsuko Nakanishi, Toshiyuki Murai
Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative sickness, where the speed of personal disease progression differs prominently due to genetic and environmental factors such as life style. Alzheimer’s disease is described by the construction of neuronal plaques and neurofibrillary tangles composed of phosphorylated tau protein. Mitochondrial dysfunction may be a noticeable feature of Alzheimer’s disease and increased production of reactive oxygen species has long been described. Superoxide dismutases (SODs) protect from excess reactive oxygen species to form less reactive hydrogen peroxide...
April 20, 2018: Diseases (Basel)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29676680/midline-central-fluid-percussion-model-of-traumatic-brain-injury-in-pediatric-and-adolescent-rats
#2
Rachel K Rowe, Jordan L Harrison, Timothy W Ellis, P David Adelson, Jonathan Lifshitz
OBJECTIVE Experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) models hold significant validity to the human condition, with each model replicating a subset of clinical features and symptoms. TBI is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in children and teenagers; thus, it is critical to develop preclinical models of these ages to test emerging treatments. Midline fluid percussion injury (FPI) might best represent mild and diffuse clinical brain injury because of the acute behavioral deficits, the late onset of behavioral morbidities, and the absence of gross histopathology...
April 20, 2018: Journal of Neurosurgery. Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29676484/structural-and-metabolic-brain-correlates-of-apathy-in-huntington-s-disease
#3
Saul Martínez-Horta, Jesús Perez-Perez, Frederic Sampedro, Javier Pagonabarraga, Andrea Horta-Barba, Mar Carceller-Sindreu, Beatriz Gomez-Anson, Gloria Andrea Lozano-Martinez, Diego Alfonso Lopez-Mora, Valle Camacho, Alejandro Fernández-León, Ignasi Carrió, Jaime Kulisevsky
BACKGROUND: Apathy is the most prevalent and characteristic neuropsychiatric feature of Huntington's disease. Congruent with the main early pathological changes, apathy is primarily associated with subcortical damage in frontal-striatal circuits. However, little is known about its precise subserving mechanisms and the contribution of regions other than the basal ganglia. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to define the neural correlates of apathy in Huntington's disease based on gray matter volume and PET/CT of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose metabolism...
April 20, 2018: Movement Disorders: Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29676228/glaucoma-pathogenesis-and-neurotrophins-focus-on-the-molecular-and-genetic-basis-for-therapeutic-prospects
#4
Nitin Chitranshi, Yogita Dheer, Mojdeh Abbasi, Yuyi You, Stuart L Graham, Vivek Gupta
BACKGROUND: Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration is a major feature of glaucoma pathology. Neuroprotective approaches that delay or halt the progression of RGC loss are needed to prevent vision loss which can occur even after conventional medical or surgical treatments to lower intraocular pressure. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this review was to examine the progress in genetics and cellular mechanisms associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, RGC dysfunction and cell death pathways in glaucoma...
April 19, 2018: Current Neuropharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29675980/longitudinal-assessment-of-hippocampus-structure-in-children-with-type-1-diabetes
#5
Lara C Foland-Ross, Allan L Reiss, Paul K Mazaika, Nelly Mauras, Stuart A Weinzimer, Tandy Aye, Michael J Tansey, Neil H White
The extant literature finds that children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) experience mild cognitive alterations compared to healthy age-matched controls. The neural basis of these cognitive differences is unclear but may relate in part to the effects of dysglycemia on the developing brain. We investigated longitudinal changes in hippocampus volume in young children with early-onset T1D. Structural magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired from 142 children with T1D and 65 age-matched control subjects (4-10 years of age at study entry) at two time points, 18 months apart...
April 19, 2018: Pediatric Diabetes
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29675962/dual-wavelength-hybrid-optoacoustic-ultrasound-biomicroscopy-for-functional-imaging-of-large-scale-cerebral-vascular-networks
#6
Johannes Rebling, Héctor Estrada, Sven Gottschalk, Gali Sela, Michael Zwack, Georg Wissmeyer, Vasilis Ntziachristos, Daniel Razansky
A critical link exists between pathological changes of cerebral vasculature and diseases affecting brain function. Microscopic techniques have played an indispensable role in the study of neurovascular anatomy and functions. Yet, investigations are often hindered by sub-optimal trade-offs between the spatiotemporal resolution, field-of-view and type of contrast offered by the existing optical microscopy techniques. We present a hybrid dual-wavelength optoacoustic biomicroscope capable of rapid transcranial visualization of large-scale cerebral vascular networks...
April 19, 2018: Journal of Biophotonics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29675583/do-alcohol-related-ampa-type-glutamate-receptor-adaptations-promote-intake
#7
F Woodward Hopf, Regina A Mangieri
Ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPA, NMDA, and kainate receptors) play a central role in excitatory glutamatergic signaling throughout the brain. As a result, functional changes, especially long-lasting forms of plasticity, have the potential to profoundly alter neuronal function and the expression of adaptive and pathological behaviors. Thus, alcohol-related adaptations in ionotropic glutamate receptors are of great interest, since they could promote excessive alcohol consumption, even after long-term abstinence...
April 20, 2018: Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29675323/fiber-bundle-basis-sparse-reconstruction-for-high-resolution-wide-field-microendoscopy
#8
Simon Peter Mekhail, Nilupaer Abudukeyoumu, Jonathan Ward, Gordon Arbuthnott, Síle Nic Chormaic
In order to observe deep regions of the brain, we propose the use of a fiber bundle for microendoscopy. Fiber bundles allow for the excitation and collection of fluorescence as well as wide field imaging while remaining largely impervious to image distortions brought on by bending. Furthermore, their thin diameter, from 200-500 µ m, means their impact on living tissue, though not absent, is minimal. Although wide field imaging with a bundle allows for a high temporal resolution since no scanning is involved, the largest criticism of bundle imaging is the drastically lowered spatial resolution...
April 1, 2018: Biomedical Optics Express
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29674752/protecting-the-ischaemic-penumbra-as-an-adjunct-to-thrombectomy-for-acute-stroke
#9
REVIEW
Jean-Claude Baron
After ischaemic stroke, brain damage can be curtailed by rescuing the 'ischaemic penumbra' - that is, the severely hypoperfused, at-risk but not yet infarcted tissue. Current evidence-based treatments involve restoration of blood flow so as to salvage the penumbra before it evolves into irreversibly damaged tissue, termed the 'core'. Intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) can salvage the penumbra if given within 4.5 h after stroke onset; however, the early recanalization rate is only ~30%. Direct removal of the occluding clot by mechanical thrombectomy considerably improves outcomes over IVT alone, but despite early recanalization in > 80% of cases, ~50% of patients who receive this treatment do not enjoy functional independence, usually because the core is already too large at the time of recanalization...
April 19, 2018: Nature Reviews. Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29673867/structural-differences-in-hippocampal-and-entorhinal-gray-matter-volume-support-individual-differences-in-first-person-navigational-ability
#10
Katherine R Sherrill, Elizabeth R Chrastil, Irem Aselcioglu, Michael E Hasselmo, Chantal E Stern
The ability to update position and orientation to reach a goal is crucial to spatial navigation and individuals vary considerably in this ability. The current structural MRI study used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis to relate individual differences in human brain morphology to performance in an active navigation task that relied on updating position and orientation in a landmark-free environment. Goal-directed navigation took place from either a first person perspective, similar to a person walking through the landmark-free environment, or Survey perspective, a bird's eye view...
April 16, 2018: Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29673580/the-long-term-effects-of-cocaine-use-on-cognitive-functioning-a-systematic-critical-review
#11
REVIEW
Kirsten M Frazer, Qwynten Richards, Diana R Keith
BACKGROUND: The predominant view of chronic cocaine use maintains that it causes a broad range of cognitive deficits. However, concerns about the possibly deleterious impact of cocaine on cognitive functioning have yet to be thoroughly vetted. This review addresses the impact of cocaine use on such cognitive domains as executive function, memory, language, and psychomotor speed. Additionally, relevant neuroimaging data is considered to understand the neural basis underlying cocaine-related effects on cognitive functioning...
April 16, 2018: Behavioural Brain Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29673485/functional-brain-networks-are-dominated-by-stable-group-and-individual-factors-not-cognitive-or-daily-variation
#12
Caterina Gratton, Timothy O Laumann, Ashley N Nielsen, Deanna J Greene, Evan M Gordon, Adrian W Gilmore, Steven M Nelson, Rebecca S Coalson, Abraham Z Snyder, Bradley L Schlaggar, Nico U F Dosenbach, Steven E Petersen
The organization of human brain networks can be measured by capturing correlated brain activity with fMRI. There is considerable interest in understanding how brain networks vary across individuals or neuropsychiatric populations or are altered during the performance of specific behaviors. However, the plausibility and validity of such measurements is dependent on the extent to which functional networks are stable over time or are state dependent. We analyzed data from nine high-quality, highly sampled individuals to parse the magnitude and anatomical distribution of network variability across subjects, sessions, and tasks...
April 18, 2018: Neuron
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29673476/personalized-neuroscience-common-and-individual-specific-features-in-functional-brain-networks
#13
Theodore D Satterthwaite, Cedric H Xia, Danielle S Bassett
Despite the translational promise of non-invasive neuroimaging, its practical application to individuals has remained largely elusive. In this issue of Neuron, Gratton et al. (2018) present data from nine highly sampled adult humans and demonstrate that functional brain networks are in large part composed of individual-specific features that are stable over time. Such data represent a critical prerequisite for the development of new diagnostics and personalized interventions for neuropsychiatric illnesses.
April 18, 2018: Neuron
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29673295/gut-microbiota-metabolism-and-psychopathology-a-critical-review-and-novel-perspectives
#14
Robin N Groen, Nicolien C de Clercq, Max Nieuwdorp, H J Rogier Hoenders, Albert K Groen
Psychiatric disorders are often associated with metabolic comorbidities. However, the mechanisms through which metabolic and psychiatric disorders are connected remain unclear. Pre-clinical studies in rodents indicate that the bidirectional signaling between the intestine and the brain, the so-called microbiome-gut-brain axis, plays an important role in the regulation of both metabolism and behavior. The gut microbiome produces a vast number of metabolites that may be transported into the host and play a part in homeostatic control of metabolism as well as brain function...
April 20, 2018: Critical Reviews in Clinical Laboratory Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29672906/do-brain-structural-abnormalities-differentiate-separate-forms-of-urgency-urinary-incontinence
#15
Becky D Clarkson, Derek Griffiths, Neil M Resnick
AIMS: Urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) is a major problem for seniors. The underlying mechanisms of disease and therapy are unknown. We sought structural brain abnormalities that might underlie the functional differences previously observed by functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in UUI patients versus controls, or among UUI responders versus non-responders to therapy-and thereby reveal potential disease mechanisms and therapeutic targets. METHODS: Secondary study of a trial of biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training (BFB) in 60 women (>60 yrs) with UUI, plus 11 age-matched continent controls...
April 19, 2018: Neurourology and Urodynamics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29671739/cellular-diversity-in-the-drosophila-midbrain-revealed-by-single-cell-transcriptomics
#16
Vincent Croset, Christoph Daniel Treiber, Scott Waddell
To understand the brain, molecular details need to be overlaid onto neural wiring diagrams so that synaptic mode, neuromodulation and critical signaling operations can be considered. Single-cell transcriptomics provide a unique opportunity to collect this information. Here we present an initial analysis of thousands of individual cells from Drosophila midbrain, that were acquired using Drop-Seq. A number of approaches permitted the assignment of transcriptional profiles to several major brain regions and cell-types...
April 19, 2018: ELife
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29671647/deep-brain-stimulation-for-trigeminal-autonomic-cephalalgias
#17
Giuseppe Messina, Giovanni Broggi, Vincenzo Levi, Angelo Franzini
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the posterior hypothalamic region (pHyr) has been shown to be efficacious for more than a half of patients suffering from trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs); nonetheless, controversies about the mechanisms of action and the actual site of stimulation have arisen in recent years. Areas covered: Firstly, a review of the most recent literature on the subject is presented, stressing the critical points that could, in the future, make a difference for optimal management of patients afflicted by these life-threating diseases...
April 19, 2018: Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29671356/extracellular-vesicles-pathogenetic-diagnostic-and-therapeutic-value-in-traumatic-brain-injury
#18
Stefania Mondello, Eric P Thelin, Gerry Shaw, Michelle Salzet, Carmela Visalli, Dasa Cizkova, Firas Kobeissy, Andras Buki
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Accurate classification according to injury-specific and patient-specific characteristics is critical to help informed clinical decision-making and to the pursuit of precision medicine in TBI. Reliable biomarker signatures for improved TBI diagnostics are required but still an unmet need. Areas covered: Extracellular vesicles (EVs) represent a new class of biomarker candidates in TBI. These nano-sized vesicles have key roles in cell signaling profoundly impacting pathogenic pathways, progression and long-term sequelae of TBI...
April 19, 2018: Expert Review of Proteomics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29671295/monitoring-the-injured-brain
#19
Anna T Mazzeo, Deepak K Gupta
Traumatic brain injury can be defined as the most complex disease in the most complex organ. When an acute brain injury occurs, several pathophysiological cascades are triggered, leading to further exacerbation of the primary damage. A number of events potentially occurring after TBI can compromise the availability or utilization of energy substrates in the brain, ultimately leading to brain energy crisis. The frequent occurrence of secondary insults in the acute phase after TBI, such as intracranial hypertension, hypotension, hypoxia, hypercapnia, hyperthermia, seizures, can then increase cerebral damage, and adversely affect outcome...
April 18, 2018: Journal of Neurosurgical Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29671055/a-new-perspective-of-the-hippocampus-in-the-origin-of-exercise-brain-interactions
#20
REVIEW
Catarina Rendeiro, Justin S Rhodes
Exercising regularly is a highly effective strategy for maintaining cognitive health throughout the lifespan. Over the last 20 years, many molecular, physiological and structural changes have been documented in response to aerobic exercise training in humans and animals, particularly in the hippocampus. However, how exercise produces such neurological changes remains elusive. A recent line of investigation has suggested that muscle-derived circulating factors cross into the brain and may be the key agents driving enhancement in synaptic plasticity and hippocampal neurogenesis from aerobic exercise...
April 18, 2018: Brain Structure & Function
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