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Lateral ankle sprains

N Harrasser, K Eichelberg, F Pohlig, H Waizy, A Toepfer, R von Eisenhart-Rothe
Because of their frequency, ankle sprains are of major clinical and economic importance. The simple sprain with uneventful healing has to be distinguished from the potentially complicated sprain which is at risk of transition to chronic ankle instability. Conservative treatment is indicated for the acute, simple ankle sprain without accompanying injuries and also in cases of chronic instability. If conservative treatment fails, good results can be achieved by anatomic ligament reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments...
October 13, 2016: Der Orthopäde
A Rosen, J Ko, C Brown
Chronic ankle instability is a common pathological consequence of ankle sprains. However, screening tools which assess self-reported dysfunction offer little insight into clinical factors which may be useful to improve deficits. The purpose of this study was to identify factors that contribute most to self-reported dysfunction. 93 individuals completed the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT), active range of motion, dynamic postural stability assessments, and an arthrometer inversion stress test to assess lateral ankle laxity and stiffness...
October 5, 2016: International Journal of Sports Medicine
Jan Paul Briet, Roderick M Houwert, Michiel G J S Hageman, Falco Hietbrink, David C Ring, Egbert Jan J M Verleisdonk
BACKGROUND: Swelling, tenderness, and ecchymosis don't correlate with time to functional recovery in patients with a lateral ankle sprain. It is established that psychosocial factors such as symptoms of depression and low pain self-efficacy correlate with pain intensity and magnitude of limitations in patients with musculoskeletal disorders. OBJECTIVE: We studied the correlation between pain self-efficacy or symptoms of depression and (1) ankle specific limitations and (2) pain intensity in patients with a lateral ankle sprain...
September 9, 2016: Injury
James M Cottom, Joseph S Baker, Phillip E Richardson
Lateral ankle sprains are a common injury that typically respond well to nonoperative therapy. When nonoperative therapy fails and patients develop chronic lateral ankle instability, they become candidates for surgical repair. The present study examined 45 consecutive patients (45 ankles) with chronic lateral ankle instability who underwent arthroscopic Broström repair using a double-row suture anchor construct. The 45 patients (27 females and 18 males) were followed up for a mean of 14 (range 12 to 20) months...
September 21, 2016: Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery: Official Publication of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons
Ki-Sik Yang, Kyungyeon Park, Bo-Ram Choi
[Purpose] This study examined the effects of a medio-lateral unstable sole on invertor and evertor activation while descending stairs. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 30 university students with no history of ankle sprain. They descended stairs while wearing the medio-lateral unstable sole or with bare feet. Electromyography was used to record the activity of the tibialis anterior and peroneus longus and brevis muscles and paired t-tests were used to assess statistical significance. [Results] The medio-lateral unstable sole group showed increased tibialis anterior and peroneus longus and brevis muscle activation compared to the barefoot group...
August 2016: Journal of Physical Therapy Science
Marie-Lyne Nault, Laurence Gascon, Jonah Hébert-Davies, Stéphane Leduc, G Yves Laflamme, Dennis Kramer
BACKGROUND: The hypothesis of this study is that a sprain or tear of 1 or more of the 3 syndesmotic ligaments will result in a significant change in the osseous anatomy relationship when comparing injured to uninjured syndesmosis. Our secondary objective was to determine whether injuries to the syndesmosis as diagnosed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be found using static imaging. METHODS: This is a descriptive radiological study of ankle MRI reports over a 12-year period, from 2 different institutions, and divided in two groups: normal and injured syndesmotic ligaments...
September 13, 2016: Foot & Ankle Specialist
Ki-Won Young, Young-Uk Park, Jin-Su Kim, Hun-Ki Cho, Ho-Sik Choo, Jang-Ho Park
BACKGROUND: The talus has a very complex anatomical morphology and is mainly fractured by a major force caused by a fall or a traffic accident. Therefore, a talus fracture is not common. However, many recent reports have shown that minor injuries, such as sprains and slips during sports activities, can induce a talar fracture especially in the lateral or posterior process. Still, fractures to the main parts of the talus (neck and body) after ankle sprains have not been reported as occult fractures...
September 2016: Clinics in Orthopedic Surgery
Karen G Roos, Zachary Y Kerr, Timothy C Mauntel, Aristarque Djoko, Thomas P Dompier, Erik A Wickstrom
BACKGROUND: Ankle sprains are a common injury in collegiate sports. Few studies have examined the epidemiology of individual ligament injuries, specifically the lateral ligament complex (LLC) of the ankle. PURPOSE: To describe the epidemiology, including the estimated yearly national incidence, of LLC sprains among National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) athletes. STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive epidemiology study. METHODS: Injury surveillance data for 25 sports from the NCAA Injury Surveillance Program (NCAA-ISP) for the academic years 2009-2010 to 2014-2015 were used for analysis...
August 29, 2016: American Journal of Sports Medicine
Scott B Shawen, Theodora Dworak, Robert B Anderson
Ankle sprains are the most common musculoskeletal injury occurring during athletics. Proper initial treatment with supportive pain control, limited immobilization, early return to weight bearing and range of motion, and directed physical therapy are essential for preventing recurrent injury. Reconstruction of the lateral ligaments is indicated for patients with continued instability and dysfunction despite physical therapy. Return to athletic activity should be reserved for athletes who have regained strength, proprioception, and range of motion of the injured ankle...
October 2016: Clinics in Sports Medicine
Juliette Ding, Antoine Moraux, Éric Nectoux, Xavier Demondion, Élisa Amzallag-Bellenger, Nathalie Boutry
OBJECTIVE: To describe a new sonographic feature for a traumatic lesion of the ankle in children. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We present a retrospective review of superior extensor retinaculum (SER) avulsions diagnosed by ultrasound (US) as a cause of subperiosteal haematoma (SPH) and periosteal apposition of the distal fibula in seven children (3 girls and 4 boys, mean age 13.4 years; age range 10-15 years) after an inversion trauma of the ankle. Two children were subsequently examined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)...
November 2016: Skeletal Radiology
Ellen Kemler, Karin M Thijs, Ilse Badenbroek, Ingrid G L van de Port, Arno W Hoes, Frank J G Backx
BACKGROUND: Acute lateral ankle ligamentous sprains (ALALS) are common injuries. This injury does not always have a favourable long-term outcome. Studies reporting the prognosis of ALALS after functional treatment are scarce. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prognosis of functionally treated ALALS, in terms of recurrent ALALS and residual symptoms. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: Patients were recruited from 20 family practices, nine physical therapy practices, the emergency departments of a regional hospital and a university hospital...
August 17, 2016: Family Practice
Frederick Michels, Guillaume Cordier, Stéphane Guillo, Filip Stockmans
Chronic instability is a common complication of lateral ankle sprains. If nonoperative treatment fails, a surgical repair or reconstruction may be indicated. Today, endoscopic techniques to treat ankle instability are becoming more popular. This article describes an endoscopic technique, using a step-by-step approach, to reconstruct the ATFL and CFL with a gracilis graft. The endoscopic technique is reproducible and safe with regard to the surrounding anatomic structures. Short and midterm results confirm the benefits of this technique...
September 2016: Foot and Ankle Clinics
Sanam Tavakoli, Saeed Forghany, Christopher Nester
BACKGROUND: Some cases of repeated inversion ankle sprains are thought to have a neurological basis and are termed functional ankle instability (FAI). In addition to factors local to the ankle, such as loss of proprioception, cognitive demands have the ability to influence motor control and may increase the risk of repetitive lateral sprains. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of cognitive demand on foot kinematics in physically active people with functional ankle instability...
September 2016: Gait & Posture
Wouter Kros, Noël L W Keijsers, John M van Ochten, Sita M A Bierma-Zeinstra, Marienke van Middelkoop
STUDY AIM: To investigate differences in the center of pressure (COP) during gait and single leg stance between subjects with persistent complaints (PC) and without persistent complaints (NPC) after a lateral ankle sprain. METHODS: 44 patients who consulted the general practitioner, 6-12 months prior to inclusion, with a lateral ankle sprain were included for the current study purpose. Using a 7-point Likert scale patients were divided into the PC or NPC group. All subjects filled out an online questionnaire, walked along a walkway and performed a single leg stance, both on the RSscan...
July 2016: Gait & Posture
Shweta Shah, Abbey C Thomas, Joshua M Noone, Christopher M Blanchette, Erik A Wikstrom
BACKGROUND: Ankle sprains represent a common injury in emergency departments, but little is known about common complications, procedures, and charges associated with ankle sprains in emergency departments. HYPOTHESIS: There will be a higher incidence of ankle sprains among younger populations (≤25 years old) and in female patients. Complications and procedures will differ between ankle sprain types. Lateral ankle sprains will have lower health care charges relative to medial and high ankle sprains...
July 29, 2016: Sports Health
Peter Kevin Thain, Gerwyn Trefor Gareth Hughes, Andrew Charles Stephen Mitchell
The use of a tilt platform to simulate a lateral ankle sprain and record muscle reaction time is a well-established procedure. However, a potential caveat is that repetitive ankle perturbation may cause a natural attenuation of the reflex latency and amplitude. This is an important area to investigate as many researchers examine the effect of an intervention on muscle reaction time. Muscle reaction time, peak and average amplitude of the peroneus longus and tibialis anterior in response to a simulated lateral ankle sprain (combined inversion and plantar flexion movement) were calculated in twenty-two physically active participants...
October 2016: Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology
R C Meisterling, R J Johnson
In brief Active patients who have recurrent ankle sprains usually have a treatable underlying neuromuscular, structural, or rehabilitation-related condition. A thorough history, neurologic exam, and physical exam involving a visual survey, foot and ankle palpation, and manual stress tests will help reveal the specific diagnosis. Most patients need only conservative treatment, which usually involves strengthening and bracing. Resistant injuries may require surgery.
March 1993: Physician and Sportsmedicine
(no author information available yet)
In brief: Ankle sprain is a risk for many athletes, especially those in the jumping sports (eg, volleyball and basketball) as well as football and soccer, where players tend to roll over on the ankle. Lateral sprains occur much more frequently than medial eversion sprains, but the latter are more devastating. In addition to types of sprains, this panel of specialists discussed surgical vs nonsurgical treatment, tape vs brace for support, rehabilitation and exercise, and ways to prevent ankle sprains.
February 1986: Physician and Sportsmedicine
S E Lane
In brief Severe (grade 3) ankle sprains with lateral ligament disruption are common in both athletes and nonathletes. Inadequate treatment leads to chronic ankle instability. Twenty-six patients underwent a 3-week treatment program using an ankle-foot orthosis (AFO), followed by a 4-week rehabilitation program. Of these patients, 96% returned to activity without restriction in about 2 1/2 months. Advantages of the AFO include ease of application, patient comfort and convenience, early ambulation, access for therapy, and rapid return to sports with a stable, asymptomatic ankle...
November 1990: Physician and Sportsmedicine
W W Briner, D E Carr, K M Lavery
In brief: Ankle sprains that primarily involve the anteroinferior tibiofibular ligament are reportedly uncommon, but the authors have recently seen several such injuries in their clinic. These high ankle sprains usually are caused by forced lateral rotation with the foot in dorsiflexion. Edema and ecchymosis are generally minimal, with pain and tenderness over the distal anterior tibiofibular syndesmosis. Pain and disability can persist for weeks. Rehabilitation consists of range-of-motion exercises leading up to weight-bearing and often takes much longer than the initial symptoms might suggest...
November 1989: Physician and Sportsmedicine
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