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Arthropod evolution

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27905469/selection-for-predation-not-female-fecundity-explains-sexual-size-dimorphism-in-the-orchid-mantises
#1
Gavin J Svenson, Sydney K Brannoch, Henrique M Rodrigues, James C O'Hanlon, Frank Wieland
Here we reconstruct the evolutionary shift towards floral simulation in orchid mantises and suggest female predatory selection as the likely driving force behind the development of extreme sexual size dimorphism. Through analysis of body size data and phylogenetic modelling of trait evolution, we recovered an ancestral shift towards sexual dimorphisms in both size and appearance in a lineage of flower-associated praying mantises. Sedentary female flower mantises dramatically increased in size prior to a transition from camouflaged, ambush predation to a floral simulation strategy, gaining access to, and visually attracting, a novel resource: large pollinating insects...
December 1, 2016: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27881649/the-many-faces-of-the-flavivirus-ns5-protein-in-antagonism-of-type-i-interferon-signaling
#2
Sonja M Best
The vector-borne flaviviruses cause severe disease in humans on every inhabited continent on earth. Their transmission by arthropods, particularly mosquitoes, facilitates large emergence events such as witnessed with Zika virus (ZIKV) or West Nile virus in the Americas. Every vector-borne flavivirus examined thus far that causes disease in humans, from dengue virus to ZIKV, antagonizes the host type I interferon (IFN-I) response by preventing JAK-STAT signaling, suggesting that suppression of this pathway is an important determinant of infection...
November 23, 2016: Journal of Virology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27826498/functional-diversity-of-resilin-in-arthropoda
#3
REVIEW
Jan Michels, Esther Appel, Stanislav N Gorb
Resilin is an elastomeric protein typically occurring in exoskeletons of arthropods. It is composed of randomly orientated coiled polypeptide chains that are covalently cross-linked together at regular intervals by the two unusual amino acids dityrosine and trityrosine forming a stable network with a high degree of flexibility and mobility. As a result of its molecular prerequisites, resilin features exceptional rubber-like properties including a relatively low stiffness, a rather pronounced long-range deformability and a nearly perfect elastic recovery...
2016: Beilstein Journal of Nanotechnology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27809783/transcriptomic-data-from-panarthropods-shed-new-light-on-the-evolution-of-insulator-binding-proteins-in-insects-insect-insulator-proteins
#4
Thomas Pauli, Lucia Vedder, Daniel Dowling, Malte Petersen, Karen Meusemann, Alexander Donath, Ralph S Peters, Lars Podsiadlowski, Christoph Mayer, Shanlin Liu, Xin Zhou, Peter Heger, Thomas Wiehe, Lars Hering, Georg Mayer, Bernhard Misof, Oliver Niehuis
BACKGROUND: Body plan development in multi-cellular organisms is largely determined by homeotic genes. Expression of homeotic genes, in turn, is partially regulated by insulator binding proteins (IBPs). While only a few enhancer blocking IBPs have been identified in vertebrates, the common fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster harbors at least twelve different enhancer blocking IBPs. We screened recently compiled insect transcriptomes from the 1KITE project and genomic and transcriptomic data from public databases, aiming to trace the origin of IBPs in insects and other arthropods...
November 3, 2016: BMC Genomics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27783385/from-success-to-persistence-identifying-an-evolutionary-regime-shift-in-the-diverse-paleozoic-aquatic-arthropod-group-eurypterida-driven-by-the-devonian-biotic-crisis
#5
James C Lamsdell, Paul A Selden
Mass extinctions have altered the trajectory of evolution a number of times over the Phanerozoic. During these periods of biotic upheaval a different selective regime appears to operate, although it is still unclear whether consistent survivorship rules apply across different extinction events. We compare variations in diversity and disparity across the evolutionary history of a major Paleozoic arthropod group, the Eurypterida. Using these data, we explore the group's transition from a successful, dynamic clade to a stagnant persistent lineage, pinpointing the Devonian as the period during which this evolutionary regime shift occurred...
October 26, 2016: Evolution; International Journal of Organic Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27780588/the-non-mammalian-mif-superfamily
#6
REVIEW
Amanda Sparkes, Patrick De Baetselier, Kim Roelants, Carl De Trez, Stefan Magez, Jo A Van Ginderachter, Geert Raes, Richard Bucala, Benoît Stijlemans
Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was first described as a cytokine 50 years ago, and emerged in mammals as a pleiotropic protein with pro-inflammatory, chemotactic, and growth-promoting activities. In addition, MIF has gained substantial attention as a pivotal upstream mediator of innate and adaptive immune responses and with pathologic roles in several diseases. Of less importance in mammals is an intrinsic but non-physiologic enzymatic activity that points to MIF's evolution from an ancient defense molecule...
October 12, 2016: Immunobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27780074/fossils-and-the-evolution-of-the-arthropod-brain
#7
REVIEW
Nicholas J Strausfeld, Xiaoya Ma, Gregory D Edgecombe
The discovery of fossilized brains and ventral nerve cords in lower and mid-Cambrian arthropods has led to crucial insights about the evolution of their central nervous system, the segmental identity of head appendages and the early evolution of eyes and their underlying visual systems. Fundamental ground patterns of lower Cambrian arthropod brains and nervous systems correspond to the ground patterns of brains and nervous systems belonging to three of four major extant panarthropod lineages. These findings demonstrate the evolutionary stability of early neural arrangements over an immense time span...
October 24, 2016: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27777729/metabolic-adaptations-in-a-range-expanding-arthropod
#8
Katrien H P Van Petegem, David Renault, Robby Stoks, Dries Bonte
Despite an increasing number of studies documenting life-history evolution during range expansions or shifts, we lack a mechanistic understanding of the underlying physiological processes. In this explorative study, we used a metabolomics approach to study physiological changes associated with the recent range expansion of the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae). Mite populations were sampled along a latitudinal gradient from range core to edge and reared under benign common garden conditions for two generations...
September 2016: Ecology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27759078/genotype-specific-interactions-between-parasitic-arthropods
#9
M Orsucci, M Navajas, S Fellous
Despite the ubiquity of coinfection, we know little of the effects of intra-specific genetic variability on coinfection by distinct parasite species. Here we test the hypothesis that parasite multiplication depends on the combination of parasite genotypes that coinfect the host (that is Genotype.parasite × Genotype.parasite interaction). To that aim, we infected tomato leaves with the ecto-parasitic mites Tetranychus urticae and Tetranychus evansi. We tested all possible combinations between four T. urticae and two T...
October 19, 2016: Heredity
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27748992/host-nuclear-genotype-influences-phenotype-of-a-conditional-mutualist-symbiont
#10
M S Hunter, P Asiimwe, A G Himler, S E Kelly
Arthropods commonly carry maternally inherited intracellular bacterial symbionts that may profoundly influence host biology and evolution. The intracellular symbiont Rickettsia sp. nr. bellii swept rapidly into populations of the sweetpotato whitefly Bemisia tabaci in the south-western USA. Previous laboratory experiments showed female-bias and fitness benefits were associated with Rickettsia infection, potentially explaining the high frequencies of infection observed in field populations, but the effects varied with whitefly genetic line...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Evolutionary Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27739374/antifreeze-proteins-from-diverse-organisms-and-their-applications-an-overview
#11
Randy Chi Fai Cheung, Tzi Bun Ng, Jack Ho Wong
Antifreeze proteins are ice-binding or ice-structuring proteins that prevent water from freezing by adsorbing to the ice surface and stopping the growth of minute ice crystals to large crystals in a non-colligative manner. The antifreeze proteins are found in species like fish, arthropods, plants, algae, fungi, yeasts and bacteria. The diversity, distribution and classification of antifreeze proteins were highlighted in this review. Antifreeze proteins help the organisms adapt to and survive in subzero temperature environments...
October 12, 2016: Current Protein & Peptide Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27731321/early-miocene-amber-inclusions-from-mexico-reveal-antiquity-of-mangrove-associated-copepods
#12
Rony Huys, Eduardo Suárez-Morales, María de Lourdes Serrano-Sánchez, Elena Centeno-García, Francisco J Vega
Copepods are aquatic microcrustaceans and represent the most abundant metazoans on Earth, outnumbering insects and nematode worms. Their position of numerical world predominance can be attributed to three principal radiation events, i.e. their major habitat shift into the marine plankton, the colonization of freshwater and semiterrestrial environments, and the evolution of parasitism. Their variety of life strategies has generated an incredible morphological plasticity and disparity in body form and shape that are arguably unrivalled among the Crustacea...
October 12, 2016: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27721806/the-terrestrial-isopod-microbiome-an-all-in-one-toolbox-for-animal-microbe-interactions-of-ecological-relevance
#13
Didier Bouchon, Martin Zimmer, Jessica Dittmer
Bacterial symbionts represent essential drivers of arthropod ecology and evolution, influencing host traits such as nutrition, reproduction, immunity, and speciation. However, the majority of work on arthropod microbiota has been conducted in insects and more studies in non-model species across different ecological niches will be needed to complete our understanding of host-microbiota interactions. In this review, we present terrestrial isopod crustaceans as an emerging model organism to investigate symbiotic associations with potential relevance to ecosystem functioning...
2016: Frontiers in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27718537/adaptive-dynamics-of-cuticular-hydrocarbons-in-drosophila
#14
Subhash Rajpurohit, Robert Hanus, Vladimír Vrkoslav, Emily L Behrman, Alan O Bergland, Dmitri Petrov, Josef Cvačka, Paul S Schmidt
Cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) are hydrophobic compounds deposited on the arthropod cuticle that are of functional significance with respect to stress tolerance, social interactions, and mating dynamics. We characterized CHC profiles in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster at five levels: across a latitudinal transect in the eastern U.S., as a function of developmental temperature during culture, across seasonal time in replicate years, and as a function of rapid evolution in experimental mesocosms in the field...
October 8, 2016: Journal of Evolutionary Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27708151/blastoderm-segmentation-in-oncopeltus-fasciatus-and-the-evolution-of-insect-segmentation-mechanisms
#15
Reut Stahi, Ariel D Chipman
Segments are formed simultaneously in the blastoderm of the fly Drosophila melanogaster through a hierarchical cascade of interacting transcription factors. Conversely, in many insects and in all non-insect arthropods most segments are formed sequentially from the posterior. We have looked at segmentation in the milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus. Posterior segments are formed sequentially, through what is probably the ancestral arthropod mechanism. Formation of anterior segments bears many similarities to the Drosophila segmentation mode...
October 12, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27696666/wnt-repertoire-and-developmental-expression-patterns-in-the-crustacean-thamnocephalus-platyurus
#16
Savvas J Constantinou, Ryan M Pace, A J Stangl, Lisa M Nagy, Terri A Williams
Wnt genes are a family of conserved glycoprotein ligands that play a role in a wide variety of cell and developmental processes, from cell proliferation to axis elongation. There are 13 Wnt subfamilies found among metazoans. Eleven of these appear conserved in arthropods with a pattern of loss during evolution of as many as six subfamilies among hexapods. Here we report on Wnt genes in the branchiopod crustacean, Thamnocephalus platyurus, including the first documentation of the expression of the complete Wnt gene family in a crustacean...
December 2016: Evolution & Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27637989/identification-of-two-lineages-of-host-associated-eriophyoid-mites-predisposed-to-different-levels-of-host-diversification
#17
Hao-Sen Li, Ary A Hoffmann, Jing-Feng Guo, Yun Zuo, Xiao-Feng Xue, Hong Pang, Xiao-Yue Hong
Herbivorous arthropods can diversify as a consequence of evolutionary changes in response to their plant hosts. Current patterns of host association of herbivores are likely to reflect a long evolutionary history of herbivore-plant co-evolution. Here, we used molecular phylogenetics to track the evolutionary history of host shifts and diversification of 66 eriophyoid mites (Acari, Eriophyoidea), and linked past patterns of evolutionary diversification to more recent patterns of divergence by tracking population genetic variation in 13 of the eriophyoid mite species feeding on different gymnosperm hosts...
December 2016: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27604873/conservation-of-mirna-mediated-silencing-mechanisms-across-600-million-years-of-animal-evolution
#18
Marta Mauri, Marieluise Kirchner, Reuven Aharoni, Camilla Ciolli Mattioli, David van den Bruck, Nadya Gutkovitch, Vengamanaidu Modepalli, Matthias Selbach, Yehu Moran, Marina Chekulaeva
Our current knowledge about the mechanisms of miRNA silencing is restricted to few lineages such as vertebrates, arthropods, nematodes and land plants. miRNA-mediated silencing in bilaterian animals is dependent on the proteins of the GW182 family. Here, we dissect the function of GW182 protein in the cnidarian Nematostella, separated by 600 million years from other Metazoa. Using cultured human cells, we show that Nematostella GW182 recruits the CCR4-NOT deadenylation complexes via its tryptophan-containing motifs, thereby inhibiting translation and promoting mRNA decay...
September 6, 2016: Nucleic Acids Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27545417/recognising-moulting-behaviour-in-trilobites-by-examining-morphology-development-and-preservation-comment-on-b%C3%A5-a%C3%A5-ejowski-et-al-2015
#19
Harriet B Drage, Allison C Daley
A 365 million year-old trilobite moult-carcass assemblage was described by Błażejowski et al. (2015) as the oldest direct evidence of moulting in the arthropod fossil record. Unfortunately, their suppositions are insufficiently supported by the data provided. Instead, the morphology, configuration and preservational context of the highly fossiliferous locality (Kowala Quarry, Poland) suggest that the specimen consists of two overlapping, queued carcasses. The wider fossil record of moulting actually extends back 520 million years, providing an unparalleled opportunity to study behaviour, ecology and development in early animals...
October 2016: BioEssays: News and Reviews in Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27540356/immunolocalization-of-arthropsin-in-the-onychophoran-euperipatoides-rowelli-peripatopsidae
#20
Isabell Schumann, Lars Hering, Georg Mayer
Opsins are light-sensitive proteins that play a key role in animal vision and are related to the ancient photoreceptive molecule rhodopsin found in unicellular organisms. In general, opsins involved in vision comprise two major groups: the rhabdomeric (r-opsins) and the ciliary opsins (c-opsins). The functionality of opsins, which is dependent on their protein structure, may have changed during evolution. In arthropods, typically r-opsins are responsible for vision, whereas in vertebrates c-opsins are components of visual photoreceptors...
2016: Frontiers in Neuroanatomy
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