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Transcranial magnetic stimulation, TMS

Joery P Molenaar, Nicol C Voermans, Lysanne A de Jong, Dick F Stegeman, Jonne Doorduin, Baziel G van Engelen
Impaired muscle relaxation is a feature of many neuromuscular disorders. However, there are few tests available to quantify muscle relaxation. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex can induce muscle relaxation by abruptly inhibiting corticospinal drive. The aim of our study is to investigate if repeatability and reliability of TMS-induced relaxation is greater than voluntary relaxation. Furthermore, effects of sex, cooling and fatigue on muscle relaxation properties were studied. Muscle relaxation of deep finger flexors was assessed in twenty-five healthy subjects (14 M and 11 F, aged 39...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Applied Physiology
Belinda J Poole, Marius Mather, Evan J Livesey, Irina M Harris, Justin A Harris
Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex produces motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) in contralateral muscles. The amplitude of these MEPs can be used to measure the excitability of the corticospinal tract during motor planning. In two experiments, we investigated learning-related changes in corticospinal excitability as subjects prepared to respond in a choice reaction-time task. Subjects responded with their left or right hand to a left or right arrow, and on some trials the arrow was immediately preceded by a warning cue that signaled which response would be required...
February 21, 2018: Cortex; a Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior
Jacqueline A Palmer, Steven L Wolf, Michael R Borich
BACKGROUND: Paired associative stimulation (PAS) combining repeated pairing of electrical stimulation of a peripheral nerve with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the primary motor cortex (M1) can induce neuroplastic adaptations in the human brain and enhance motor learning in neurologically-intact individuals. However, the extent to which PAS is an effective technique for inducing associative plasticity and improving motor function in individuals post-stroke is unclear. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the effects of a single session of PAS to modulate corticomotor excitability and motor skill performance in individuals post-stroke...
2018: Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience
Jocelyn Breton, Edwin M Robertson
Our brains are constantly processing past events [1]. These off-line processes consolidate memories, leading in the case of motor skill memories to an enhancement in performance between training sessions. A similar magnitude of enhancement develops over a night of sleep following an implicit task, when a sequence of movements is acquired unintentionally, or following an explicit task, when the same sequence is acquired intentionally [2]. What remains poorly understood, however, is whether these similar offline improvements are supported by similar circuits, or through distinct circuits...
June 2017: Nature Human Behaviour
Nadia Bolognini, Carlo Miniussi
Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial electric stimulation (tES) are noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS) tools that are now widely used in neuroscientific research in humans. The fact that both TMS and tES are able to modulate brain plasticity and, in turn, affect behavior is opening up new horizons in the treatment of brain circuit and plasticity disorders. In the present chapter, we will first provide the reader with a brief background on the basic principles of NIBS, describing the electromagnetic and physical foundations of TMS and tES, as well as the current knowledge of the neurophysiologic basis of their effects on brain activity and plasticity...
2018: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
Christopher Allen, Krish D Singh, Frederick Verbruggen, Christopher D Chambers
This pre-registered experiment sought to uncover the temporal relationship between the inferior frontal cortex (IFC) and the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) during stopping of an ongoing action. Both regions have previously been highlighted as being central to cognitive control of actions, particularly response inhibition. Here we tested which area is activated first during the stopping process using magnetoencephalography, before assessing the relative chronometry of each region using functionally localized transcranial magnetic stimulation...
February 2018: Royal Society Open Science
Giuseppe Lanza, Mariagiovanna Cantone, Debora Aricò, Bartolo Lanuzza, Filomena Irene Ilaria Cosentino, Domenico Paci, Maurizio Papotto, Manuela Pennisi, Rita Bella, Giovanni Pennisi, Walter Paulus, Raffaele Ferri
Background: Based on the hyperexcitability and disinhibition observed in patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS) following transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), we conducted a study with low-frequency repetitive TMS (rTMS) over the primary motor (M1) and somatosensory cortical areas (S1) in patients with RLS. Methods: A total of 13 right-handed patients and 10 age-matched controls were studied using clinical scales and TMS. Measurements included resting motor threshold (rMT), motor-evoked potentials (MEPs), cortical silent period (CSP), and central motor conduction time (CMCT)...
2018: Therapeutic Advances in Neurological Disorders
Cheng-Chang Yang, Najat Khalifa, Birgit Völlm
BACKGROUND: Impulsivity is a multi-faceted concept. It is a crucial feature of many neuropsychiatric disorders. Three subtypes of impulsivity have been identified: motor, temporal, and cognitive impulsivity. Existing evidence suggests that the right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG) plays a crucial role in impulsivity, and such a role has been elucidated using inhibitory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). There is a dearth of studies using excitatory rTMS at the rIFG, an important gap in the literature this study aimed to address...
March 2, 2018: Behavioural Brain Research
Mark Gaertner, Jiang-Ti Kong, Kristen H Scherrer, Alyssa Foote, Sean Mackey, Kevin A Johnson
INTRODUCTION: Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS), a rare and severe chronic pain condition, often responds poorly to existing treatments. Previous studies demonstrated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) provided short-term pain relief for upper extremity CRPS. METHODS: Building on previous methodologies, we employed a TMS protocol that may lead to significant pain relief for upper and lower extremity CRPS in a nonrandomized open label pilot trial involving 21 participants...
March 4, 2018: Neuromodulation: Journal of the International Neuromodulation Society
José Manuel Matamala, James Howells, Thanuja Dharmadasa, Terry Trinh, Yan Ma, Lydia Lera, Steve Vucic, David Burke, Matthew C Kiernan
Paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) using fixed test stimuli suffers from marked variability of the motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude. Threshold tracking TMS (TT-TMS) was introduced to overcome this problem. The aim of this work was to describe the absolute and relative reliability of short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) using threshold tracking TMS (TT-TMS). Cortical excitability studies were performed on twenty-six healthy subjects over three sessions (two recordings on the same day and one seven days apart), with MEPs recorded over abductor pollicis brevis...
March 1, 2018: Neuroscience Letters
Michele Dileone, Laura Mordillo-Mateos, Antonio Oliviero, Guglielmo Foffani
BACKGROUND: Transcranial static magnetic field stimulation (tSMS) was recently added to the family of inhibitory non-invasive brain stimulation techniques. However, the application of tSMS for 10-20 min over the motor cortex (M1) induces only short-lasting effects that revert within few minutes. OBJECTIVE: We examined whether increasing the duration of tSMS to 30 min leads to long-lasting changes in cortical excitability, which is critical for translating tSMS toward clinical applications...
February 7, 2018: Brain Stimulation
Jana Klaus, Dennis J L G Schutter
Non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) has become a common method to study the interrelations between the brain and language functioning. This meta-analysis examined the efficacy of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and direct current stimulation (tDCS) in the study of language production in healthy volunteers. Forty-five effect sizes from 30 studies which investigated the effects of NIBS on picture naming or verbal fluency in healthy participants were meta-analysed. Further sub-analyses investigated potential influences of stimulation type, control, target site, task, online vs...
February 27, 2018: Brain and Cognition
Michael Jigo, Mengyuan Gong, Taosheng Liu
Studies of feature-based attention have associated activity in a dorsal frontoparietal network with putative attentional priority signals. Yet, how this neural activity mediates attentional selection and whether it guides behavior are fundamental questions that require investigation. We reasoned that endogenous fluctuations in the quality of attentional priority should influence task performance. Human subjects detected a speed increment while viewing clockwise (CW) or counterclockwise (CCW) motion (baseline task) or while attending to either direction amid distracters (attention task)...
January 2018: ENeuro
Jellina Prinsen, Stephanie Brams, Kaat Alaerts
The eyes constitute a highly salient cue to communicate social intent. Previous research showed that direct eye contact between two individuals can readily evoke an increased propensity to 'mirror' other peoples' actions. Considering the implicated role of the prosocial neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) in enhancing the saliency of social cues and modulating approach/avoidance motivational tendencies, the current study adopted the non-invasive brain stimulation technique transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to explore whether a single dose of intranasal OXT (24 IU) modulated (enhanced) a person's propensity to show heightened mirroring or motor resonance upon salient social cues, such as eye contact...
February 22, 2018: Psychoneuroendocrinology
Lize Hermans, Oron Levin, Celine Maes, Peter van Ruitenbeek, Kirstin-Friederike Heise, Richard A E Edden, Nicolaas A J Puts, Ronald Peeters, Bradley R King, Raf L J Meesen, Inge Leunissen, Stephan P Swinnen, Koen Cuypers
Edited magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) have often been used to study the integrity of the GABAergic neurotransmission system in healthy aging. To investigate whether the measurement outcomes obtained with these 2 techniques are associated with each other in older human adults, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels in the left sensorimotor cortex were assessed with edited MRS in 28 older (63-74 years) and 28 young adults (19-34 years). TMS at rest was then used to measure intracortical inhibition (short-interval intracortical inhibition/long-interval intracortical inhibition), intracortical facilitation, interhemispheric inhibition from left to right primary motor cortex (M1) and recruitment curves of left and right M1...
February 6, 2018: Neurobiology of Aging
Paul Boon, Elien De Cock, Ann Mertens, Eugen Trinka
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Neurostimulation is becoming an increasingly accepted treatment alternative for patients with drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE) who are unsuitable surgery candidates. Standardized guidelines on when or how to use the various neurostimulation modalities are lacking. We conducted a systematic review on the currently available neurostimulation modalities primarily with regard to effectiveness and safety. RECENT FINDINGS: For vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), there is moderate-quality evidence for its effectiveness in adults with drug-resistant partial epilepsies...
April 2018: Current Opinion in Neurology
Morgana Novaes, Fernanda Palhano-Fontes, Andre Peres, Kelley Mazzetto-Betti, Maristela Pelicioni, Kátia Andrade, Antonio Santos, Octavio Pontes-Neto, Draulio Araujo
BACKGROUND: Mirror therapy (MT) is becoming an alternative rehabilitation strategy for various conditions, including stroke. Although recent studies suggest the positive benefit of MT in chronic stroke motor recovery, little is known about its neural mechanisms. PURPOSE: To identify functional brain changes induced by a single MT intervention in ischemic stroke survivors, assessed by both Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI)...
March 1, 2018: International Journal of Neuroscience
Noah S Philip, Jennifer Barredo, Emily Aiken, Linda L Carpenter
Research into therapeutic transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) for major depression has dramatically increased in the last decade. Understanding the mechanism of action of TMS is crucial to improve efficacy and develop the next generation of therapeutic stimulation. Early imaging research provided initial data supportive of widely held assumptions about hypothesized inhibitory or excitatory consequences of stimulation. Early work also indicated that while TMS modulated brain activity under the stimulation site, effects at deeper regions, in particular, the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex, were associated with clinical improvement...
March 2018: Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging
Paul B Fitzgerald, Kate E Hoy, David Elliot, Susan McQueen, Lenore E Wambeek, Zafiris J Daskalakis
BACKGROUND: High-frequency left-sided repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is now commonly used treatment for patients with depression. However, there are several other forms of rTMS (low-frequency right-sided and sequential bilateral rTMS) which have also been shown to be effective. No information has been systematically gathered on the likelihood of response to alternative forms of rTMS in patients who do not improve after an initial course of left-sided treatment. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether there are differences in antidepressant response between switching to either low-frequency right sided or sequential bilateral stimulation or continuing high-frequency left-sided TMS following non-response to an initial course of high-frequency left-sided rTMS...
February 17, 2018: Journal of Affective Disorders
Ramesh Naidu Annavarapu, Srujana Kathi, Vamsi Krishna Vadla
The aim of this article is to highlight current approaches for imaging elderly brain, indispensable for cognitive neuroscience research with emphasis on the basic physical principles of various non-invasive neuroimaging techniques. The first part of this article presents a quick overview of the primary non-invasive neuroimaging modalities used by cognitive neuroscientists such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), transcranial electrical stimulation (tES), electroencephalography (EEG), magnetoencephalography (MEG), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), positron emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), Profusion imaging, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) along with tractography and connectomics...
February 21, 2018: Journal of Chemical Neuroanatomy
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