keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

torpor

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28918505/purification-and-characterization-of-skeletal-muscle-pyruvate-kinase-from-the-hibernating-ground-squirrel-urocitellus-richardsonii-potential-regulation-by-posttranslational-modification-during-torpor
#1
Ryan A V Bell, Kenneth B Storey
Ground squirrel torpor during winter hibernation is characterized by numerous physiological and biochemical changes, including alterations to fuel metabolism. During torpor, many tissues switch from carbohydrate to lipid catabolism, often by regulating key enzymes within glycolytic and lipolytic pathways. This study investigates the potential regulation of pyruvate kinase (PK), a key member of the glycolytic pathway, within the skeletal muscle of hibernating ground squirrels. PK was purified from the skeletal muscle of control and torpid Richardson's ground squirrels, and PK kinetics, structural stability, and posttranslational modifications were subsequently assessed...
September 16, 2017: Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28878736/commentary-torpor-the-rise-and-fall-of-3-monoiodothyronamine-from-brain-to-gut-from-gut-to-brain
#2
COMMENT
Annunziatina Laurino, Laura Raimondi
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2017: Frontiers in Endocrinology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28874726/remarkable-plasticity-of-na-k-atpase-ca-2-atpase-and-serca-contributes-to-muscle-disuse-atrophy-resistance-in-hibernating-daurian-ground-squirrels
#3
Quanling Guo, Xin Mi, Xiaoyong Sun, Xiaoyu Li, Weiwei Fu, Shenhui Xu, Qi Wang, Yasir Arfat, Huiping Wang, Hui Chang, Yunfang Gao
We investigated cytosolic calcium (Ca(2+)) and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) regulation in skeletal muscle fibers of hibernating Daurian ground squirrels (Spermophilus dauricus), non-hibernating hindlimb-unloaded (HLU) squirrels, and HLU rats to clarify the molecular mechanisms involved in preventing muscle atrophy in hibernators. The Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and Ca(2+)-ATPase activities in the soleus muscle (SOL) of squirrels were maintained in hibernation, decreased during interbout arousal (IB-A), and increased to autumn/pre-hibernation (AUT/Pre-H) levels in torpor after interbout arousal (Post-IBA), whereas activities in the extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL) were stable during hibernation, but increased during post-hibernation (Post-H)...
September 5, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28844867/integrated-stress-response-stimulates-fgf21-expression-systemic-enhancer-of-longevity
#4
REVIEW
Antero Salminen, Kai Kaarniranta, Anu Kauppinen
FGF21 is a multifunctional metabolic and stress hormone which is normally expressed in liver but cellular stress, e.g. mitochondrial or endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, can induce its expression and subsequent secretion from several mammalian tissues. The stress kinases of the integrated stress response (ISR) pathway stimulate the expression of FGF21 through the activation of ATF4 transcription factor, thus enhancing cellular stress resistance. The metabolic and stress-inducible transactivation mechanisms of FGF21 gene are mostly mediated through separate pathways...
August 24, 2017: Cellular Signalling
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28835446/white-nose-syndrome-increases-torpid-metabolic-rate-and-evaporative-water-loss-in-hibernating-bats
#5
Liam P McGuire, Heather W Mayberry, Craig K R Willis
Fungal diseases of wildlife typically manifest as superficial skin infections but can have devastating consequences for host physiology and survival. White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a fungal skin disease that has killed millions of hibernating bats in North America since 2007. Infection with the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans causes bats to rewarm too often during hibernation, but the cause of increased arousal rates remains unknown. Based on data from studies of captive and free-living bats, two mechanistic models have been proposed to explain disease processes in WNS...
August 23, 2017: American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28806499/hibernating-little-pocket-mice-show-few-seasonal-changes-in-bone-properties
#6
Noellyn Pineda, Marjorie Owen, Claire Tucker, Samantha Wojda, Stanley Kitchen, Hal Black, Seth Donahue
Periods of disuse or physical inactivity increases bone porosity and decreases bone mineral density, resulting in a loss of bone mechanical competence in many animals. Although large hibernators like bears and marmots prevent bone loss during hibernation, despite long periods of physical inactivity, some small hibernators do lose bone during hibernation. Little pocket mice (Perognathus longimembris) remain underground during winter hibernation and undergo bouts of torpor and interbout arousals, but the torpor bout duration is shorter than other rodent hibernators...
August 14, 2017: Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28780752/regulation-of-smad-mediated-microrna-transcriptional-response-in-ground-squirrels-during-hibernation
#7
Cheng-Wei Wu, Kenneth B Storey
Mammalian hibernation is a state of dormancy that is used by some animals to survive through the unfavorable conditions of winter, and is characterized by coordinated suppression of basal metabolism that is supported by global inhibition of energy/ATP-consuming processes. In this study, we examine the regulation of the anti-proliferatory TGF-β/Smad transcription factor signaling pathway in the liver tissue of the hibernating 13-lined ground squirrel Ictidomys tridecemlineatus. The TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway is known to mediate cell cycle arrest through induction of cell cycle dependent kinase inhibitors, and more recently, has been shown to regulate a wide range of cellular processes via its control of microRNA biosynthesis...
August 5, 2017: Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28770069/sociality-influences-thermoregulation-and-roost-switching-in-a-forest-bat-using-ephemeral-roosts
#8
Danilo Russo, Luca Cistrone, Ivana Budinski, Giulia Console, Martina Della Corte, Claudia Milighetti, Ivy Di Salvo, Valentina Nardone, R Mark Brigham, Leonardo Ancillotto
In summer, many temperate bat species use daytime torpor, but breeding females do so less to avoid interferences with reproduction. In forest-roosting bats, deep tree cavities buffer roost microclimate from abrupt temperature oscillations and facilitate thermoregulation. Forest bats also switch roosts frequently, so thermally suitable cavities may be limiting. We tested how barbastelle bats (Barbastella barbastellus), often roosting beneath flaking bark in snags, may thermoregulate successfully despite the unstable microclimate of their preferred cavities...
July 2017: Ecology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28766065/body-temperatures-of-hibernating-little-brown-bats-reveal-pronounced-behavioural-activity-during-deep-torpor-and-suggest-a-fever-response-during-white-nose-syndrome
#9
Heather W Mayberry, Liam P McGuire, Craig K R Willis
Hibernating animals use torpor [reduced body temperature (T b) and metabolic rate] to reduce energy expenditure during winter. Periodic arousals to normal T b are energetically expensive, so hibernators trade off arousal benefits against energetic costs. This is especially important for bats with white-nose syndrome (WNS), a fungal disease causing increased arousal frequency. Little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) with WNS show upregulation of endogenous pyrogens and sickness behaviour. Therefore, we hypothesized that WNS should cause a fever response characterized by elevated T b...
August 1, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. B, Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28746349/new-insights-on-the-regulation-of-the-adenine-nucleotide-pool-of-erythrocytes-in-mouse-models
#10
William G O'Brien, Han Shawn Ling, Zhaoyang Zhao, Cheng Chi Lee
The observation that induced torpor in non-hibernating mammals could result from an increased AMP concentration in circulation led our investigation to reveal that the added AMP altered oxygen transport of erythrocytes. To further study the effect of AMP in regulation of erythrocyte function and systemic metabolism, we generated mouse models deficient in key erythrocyte enzymes in AMP metabolism. We have previously reported altered erythrocyte adenine nucleotide levels corresponding to altered oxygen saturation in mice deficient in both CD73 and AMPD3...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28698715/erratum-torpor-the-rise-and-fall-of-3-monoiodothyronamine-from-brain-to-gut-from-gut-to-brain
#11
(no author information available yet)
[This corrects the article on p. 118 in vol. 8, PMID: 28620354.].
2017: Frontiers in Endocrinology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28698229/changes-in-the-phosphoproteome-of-brown-adipose-tissue-during-hibernation-in-the-ground-squirrel-ictidomys-tridecemlineatus
#12
Didier Vertommen, Gaetan Herinckx, Nusrat Hussain, Fred Opperdoes, Kenneth B Storey, Mark H Rider
Mammalian hibernation is characterized by metabolic rate depression and a strong decrease in core body temperature. Brown adipose tissue (BAT), a thermogenic tissue that uses uncoupled mitochondrial respiration to generate heat instead of ATP, plays a major role in rewarming from deep torpor. In the present study we developed a label-free LC-MS strategy to investigate both differential protein expression and protein phosphorylation in BAT extracts from euthermic versus hibernating ground squirrels. In particular, we incorporated the filter-assisted sample preparation (FASP) protocol, which provides a more in-depth analysis compared with gel-based and other LC-MS proteomics approaches...
July 10, 2017: Physiological Genomics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28641050/thrifty-females-frisky-males-winter-energetics-of-hibernating-bats-from-a-cold-climate
#13
Zenon J Czenze, Kristin A Jonasson, Craig K R Willis
Mammalian hibernation consists of energy-saving torpor bouts (periods of controlled reduction in body temperature [Tb]) interspersed with brief arousals to normothermic Tb. Frequency and duration of torpor bouts and arousals can affect winter survival and are thought to be influenced by an optimization balancing the energetic benefits of prolonged torpor against the physiological and ecological costs (e.g., accumulation of metabolic wastes). Female little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) spend their fat reserves more slowly than males during winter, presumably so they can emerge from hibernation in good condition to initiate pregnancy...
July 2017: Physiological and Biochemical Zoology: PBZ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28626157/protein-restriction-does-not-affect-body-temperature-pattern-in-female-mice
#14
Goro A Kato, Hiroki Shichijo, Toshihiro Takahashi, Akio Shinohara, Tetsuo Morita, Chihiro Koshimoto
Daily torpor is a physiological adaptation in mammals and birds characterized by a controlled reduction of metabolic rate and body temperature during the resting phase of circadian rhythms. In laboratory mice, daily torpor is induced by dietary caloric restriction. However, it is not known which nutrients are related to daily torpor expression. To determine whether dietary protein is a key factor in inducing daily torpor in mice, we fed mice a protein-restricted (PR) diet that included only one-quarter of the amount of protein but the same caloric level as a control (C) diet...
June 13, 2017: Experimental Animals
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28622494/laryngeal-neuropathy-in-adult-goats-with-copper-deficiency
#15
R F A Sousa, V M Almeida, J E Neto, C W A Nascimento, G X Medeiros, R M T Medeiros, F Riet-Correa, F S Mendonça
The aim of this study was to elucidate the cause of a neurological syndrome characterized by stridor in adult goats with clinical signs of copper deficiency. The main clinical signs consisted of apathy, emaciation, pale mucous membranes, mucous nasal discharge, dyspnea, severe achromotrichia, diffuse alopecia, torpor, ataxia, and stridor. When the goats were forced to move, the stridor increased. In a herd of 194 Toggenburg goats, 10 adult goats with clinical signs of copper deficiency were removed from the herd and divided into 2 groups: group 1, which consisted of 4 nannies and 1 buck with stridor, and group 2, which consisted of 4 nannies and 1 buck without stridor...
July 2017: Veterinary Pathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28620354/torpor-the-rise-and-fall-of-3-monoiodothyronamine-from-brain-to-gut-from-gut-to-brain
#16
REVIEW
Hartmut H Glossmann, Oliver M D Lutz
3-Monoiodothyronamine (T1AM), first isolated from rat brain, is reported to be an endogenous, rapidly acting metabolite of thyroxine. One of its numerous effects is the induction of a "torpor-like" state in experimental animals. A critical analysis of T1AM, to serve as an endogenous cryogen, is given. The proposed biosynthetic pathway for formation of T1AM, which includes deiodinases and ornithine decarboxylase in the upper intestinum, is an unusual one. To reach the brain via systemic circulation, enterohepatic recycling and passage through the liver may occur...
2017: Frontiers in Endocrinology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28614673/pseudogymnoascus-destructans-transcriptome-changes-during-white-nose-syndrome-infections
#17
Sophia M Reeder, Jonathan M Palmer, Jenni M Prokkola, Thomas M Lilley, DeeAnn M Reeder, Kenneth A Field
White nose syndrome (WNS) is caused by the psychrophilic fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans that can grow in the environment saprotrophically or parasitically by infecting hibernating bats. Infections are pathological in many species of North American bats, disrupting hibernation and causing mortality. To determine what fungal pathways are involved in infection of living tissue, we examined fungal gene expression using RNA-Seq. We compared P. destructans gene expression when grown in culture to that during infection of a North American bat species, Myotis lucifugus, that shows high WNS mortality...
June 14, 2017: Virulence
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28597237/energy-conserving-thermoregulatory-patterns-and-lower-disease-severity-in-a-bat-resistant-to-the-impacts-of-white-nose-syndrome
#18
Marianne S Moore, Kenneth A Field, Melissa J Behr, Gregory G Turner, Morgan E Furze, Daniel W F Stern, Paul R Allegra, Sarah A Bouboulis, Chelsey D Musante, Megan E Vodzak, Matthew E Biron, Melissa B Meierhofer, Winifred F Frick, Jeffrey T Foster, Daryl Howell, Joseph A Kath, Allen Kurta, Gerda Nordquist, Joseph S Johnson, Thomas M Lilley, Benjamin W Barrett, DeeAnn M Reeder
The devastating bat fungal disease, white-nose syndrome (WNS), does not appear to affect all species equally. To experimentally determine susceptibility differences between species, we exposed hibernating naïve little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus) and big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) to the fungus that causes WNS, Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd). After hibernating under identical conditions, Pd lesions were significantly more prevalent and more severe in little brown myotis. This species difference in pathology correlates with susceptibility to WNS in the wild and suggests that survival is related to different host physiological responses...
June 8, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. B, Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28588221/ketogenic-diet-induces-expression-of-the-muscle-circadian-gene-slc25a25-via-neural-pathway-that-might-be-involved-in-muscle-thermogenesis
#19
Reiko Nakao, Shigeki Shimba, Katsutaka Oishi
We recently found that the mRNA expression of Slc25a25, a Ca(2+)-sensitive ATP carrier in the inner mitochondrial membrane, fluctuates in a circadian manner in mouse skeletal muscle. We showed here that the circadian expression of muscle Slc25a25 was damped in Clock mutant, muscle-specific Bmal1-deficient, and global Bmal1-deficient mice. Furthermore, a ketogenic diet (KD) that induces time-of-day-dependent hypothermia (torpor), induced Slc25a25 mRNA expression in skeletal muscle. Hypothermia induced by KD did not affect thermogenic genes such as Sarcolipin and Pgc1a in muscles and Ucp1 in adipose tissues...
June 6, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28576823/heart-rate-dynamics-in-a-marsupial-hibernator
#20
Steven J Swoap, Gerhard Körtner, Fritz Geiser
The eastern pygmy possum (Cercartetus nanus) is a small marsupial that can express spontaneous short bouts of torpor, as well as multi-day bouts of deep hibernation. To examine heart rate (fH) control at various stages of torpor in a marsupial hibernator, and to see whether fH variability differs from that of deep placental hibernators, we used radiotelemetry to measure ECG and body temperature (Tb) while measuring the rate of O2 consumption and ventilation. fH and O2 consumption rate during euthermia were at a minimum (321±34 beats min(-1), 0...
August 15, 2017: Journal of Experimental Biology
keyword
keyword
117525
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"