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Neanderthals

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28277523/neanderthal-tooth-plaque-hints-at-meals-and-kisses
#1
Ewen Callaway
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 8, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28273061/neanderthal-behaviour-diet-and-disease-inferred-from-ancient-dna-in-dental-calculus
#2
Laura S Weyrich, Sebastian Duchene, Julien Soubrier, Luis Arriola, Bastien Llamas, James Breen, Alan G Morris, Kurt W Alt, David Caramelli, Veit Dresely, Milly Farrell, Andrew G Farrer, Michael Francken, Neville Gully, Wolfgang Haak, Karen Hardy, Katerina Harvati, Petra Held, Edward C Holmes, John Kaidonis, Carles Lalueza-Fox, Marco de la Rasilla, Antonio Rosas, Patrick Semal, Arkadiusz Soltysiak, Grant Townsend, Donatella Usai, Joachim Wahl, Daniel H Huson, Keith Dobney, Alan Cooper
Recent genomic data have revealed multiple interactions between Neanderthals and modern humans, but there is currently little genetic evidence regarding Neanderthal behaviour, diet, or disease. Here we describe the shotgun-sequencing of ancient DNA from five specimens of Neanderthal calcified dental plaque (calculus) and the characterization of regional differences in Neanderthal ecology. At Spy cave, Belgium, Neanderthal diet was heavily meat based and included woolly rhinoceros and wild sheep (mouflon), characteristic of a steppe environment...
March 8, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28252042/understanding-the-emergence-of-modern-humans-and-the-disappearance-of-neanderthals-insights-from-kaldar-cave-khorramabad-valley-western-iran
#3
Behrouz Bazgir, Andreu Ollé, Laxmi Tumung, Lorena Becerra-Valdivia, Katerina Douka, Thomas Higham, Jan van der Made, Andrea Picin, Palmira Saladié, Juan Manuel López-García, Hugues-Alexandre Blain, Ethel Allué, Mónica Fernández-García, Iván Rey-Rodríguez, Diego Arceredillo, Faranak Bahrololoumi, Moloudsadat Azimi, Marcel Otte, Eudald Carbonell
Kaldar Cave is a key archaeological site that provides evidence of the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition in Iran. Excavations at the site in 2014-2015 led to the discovery of cultural remains generally associated with anatomically modern humans (AMHs) and evidence of a probable Neanderthal-made industry in the basal layers. Attempts have been made to establish a chronology for the site. These include four thermoluminescence (TL) dates for Layer 4, ranging from 23,100 ± 3300 to 29,400 ± 2300 BP, and three AMS radiocarbon dates from charcoal samples belonging to the lower part of the same layer, yielding ages of 38,650-36,750 cal BP, 44,200-42,350 cal BP, and 54,400-46,050 cal BP (all at the 95...
March 2, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28238406/the-effect-of-trauma-on-neanderthal-culture-a-mathematical-analysis
#4
W Nakahashi
Traumatic lesions are often observed in ancient skeletal remains. Since ancient medical technology was immature, severely traumatized individuals may have frequently lost the physical ability for cultural skills that demand complex body movements. I develop a mathematical model to analyze the effect of trauma on cultural transmission and apply it to Neanderthal culture using Neanderthal fossil data. I estimate from the data that the proportion of adult individuals who suffered traumatic injuries before death was approximately 0...
February 4, 2017: Homo: Internationale Zeitschrift Für die Vergleichende Forschung Am Menschen
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28195302/testing-biomechanical-models-of-human-lumbar-lordosis-variability
#5
Eric R Castillo, Connie Hsu, Ross W Mair, Daniel E Lieberman
OBJECTIVES: Lumbar lordosis (LL) is a key adaptation for bipedalism, but factors underlying curvature variations remain unclear. This study tests three biomechanical models to explain LL variability. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty adults (15 male, 15 female) were scanned using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a standing posture analysis was conducted, and lumbar range of motion (ROM) was assessed. Three measures of LL were compared. The trunk's center of mass was estimated from external markers to calculate hip moments (Mhip ) and lumbar flexion moments...
February 13, 2017: American Journal of Physical Anthropology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28185859/association-of-irf5-polymorphisms-with-increased-risk-for-systemic-lupus-erythematosus-in-population-of-crete-a-southern-eastern-european-greek-island
#6
M I Zervou, J M Dorschner, Y Ghodke-Puranik, D T Boumpas, T B Niewold, G N Goulielmos
Interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) regulates type I interferon (IFN)-responsive genes, and has been one of the most consistently associated genes with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We sought to investigate whether IRF5 haplotypes are associated with risk for SLE in the genetically homogeneous Greek population of the island of Crete, as well as whether these haplotypes are associated with increased type I IFN. 322 SLE patients and 247 healthy controls from Crete were genotyped for rs2004640, rs3807306, rs10488631 and rs2280714 SNPs of IRF5 gene by using Taqman primer-probe sets...
April 30, 2017: Gene
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28166906/the-morphology-of-the-enamel-dentine-junction-in-neanderthal-molars-gross-morphology-non-metric-traits-and-temporal-trends
#7
Robert M G Martin, Jean-Jacques Hublin, Philipp Gunz, Matthew M Skinner
This study explores the morphological differences between the enamel-dentine junction (EDJ) of maxillary and mandibular molars of Neanderthals (n = 150) and recent modern humans (n = 106), and between an earlier Neanderthal sample (consisting of Pre-Eemian and Eemian Neanderthals dating to before 115 ka) and a later Neanderthal sample (consisting of Post-Eemian Neanderthals dating to after 115 ka). The EDJ was visualised by segmenting microtomographic scans of each molar. A geometric morphometric methodology compared the positioning of the dentine horns, the shape of the marginal ridge between the dentine horns, and the shape of the cervix...
February 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28154067/interglacial-neanderthal-habitats
#8
Andrew M Sugden
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 3, 2017: Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28125602/the-aggradational-successions-of-the-aniene-river-valley-in-rome-age-constraints-to-early-neanderthal-presence-in-europe
#9
Fabrizio Marra, Piero Ceruleo, Luca Pandolfi, Carmelo Petronio, Mario F Rolfo, Leonardo Salari
We revise the chronostratigraphy of several sedimentary successions cropping out along a 5 km-long tract of the Aniene River Valley in Rome (Italy), which yielded six hominin remains previously attributed to proto- or archaic Neanderthal individuals, as well as a large number of lithic artefacts showing intermediate characteristics somewhere between the local Acheulean and Mousterian cultures. Through a method of correlation of aggradational successions with post-glacial sea-level rises, relying on a large set of published 40Ar/39Ar ages of interbedded volcanic deposits, we demonstrate that deposition of the sediments hosting the human remains spans the interval 295-220 ka...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28025273/transmission-between-archaic-and-modern-human-ancestors-during-the-evolution-of-the-oncogenic-human-papillomavirus-16
#10
Ville N Pimenoff, Cristina Mendes de Oliveira, Ignacio G Bravo
Every human suffers through life a number of papillomaviruses (PVs) infections, most of them asymptomatic. A notable exception are persistent infections by Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16), the most oncogenic infectious agent for humans and responsible for most infection-driven anogenital cancers. Oncogenic potential is not homogeneous among HPV16 lineages, and genetic variation within HPV16 exhibits some geographic structure. However, an in-depth analysis of the HPV16 evolutionary history was still wanting...
October 7, 2016: Molecular Biology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28000406/zygomatic-root-position-in-recent-and-fossil-hominids
#11
Gerhard W Weber, Viktoria A Krenn
The relative position of the zygomatic root to the dentition plays a crucial role in determining the overall strength of the face in response to bite forces. The powerful superficial head of the masseter arises there and the zygomaticoalveolar crest (ZAC) is discussed as a buttressing feature of the face. For instance, a more forwardly or backwardly positioned zygomatic root or a lower or higher vertical distance to the dentition could be indicative for evolutionary adaptations to particular loading regimes which are associated with diet...
January 2017: Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27936135/identifying-major-transitions-in-the-evolution-of-lithic-cutting-edge-production-rates
#12
Antoine Muller, Chris Clarkson
The notion that the evolution of core reduction strategies involved increasing efficiency in cutting edge production is prevalent in narratives of hominin technological evolution. Yet a number of studies comparing two different knapping technologies have found no significant differences in edge production. Using digital analysis methods we present an investigation of raw material efficiency in eight core technologies broadly representative of the long-term evolution of lithic technology. These are bipolar, multiplatform, discoidal, biface, Levallois, prismatic blade, punch blade and pressure blade production...
2016: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27853181/selective-sweep-on-human-amylase-genes-postdates-the-split-with-neanderthals
#13
Charlotte E Inchley, Cynthia D A Larbey, Nzar A A Shwan, Luca Pagani, Lauri Saag, Tiago Antão, Guy Jacobs, Georgi Hudjashov, Ene Metspalu, Mario Mitt, Christina A Eichstaedt, Boris Malyarchuk, Miroslava Derenko, Joseph Wee, Syafiq Abdullah, François-Xavier Ricaut, Maru Mormina, Reedik Mägi, Richard Villems, Mait Metspalu, Martin K Jones, John A L Armour, Toomas Kivisild
Humans have more copies of amylase genes than other primates. It is still poorly understood, however, when the copy number expansion occurred and whether its spread was enhanced by selection. Here we assess amylase copy numbers in a global sample of 480 high coverage genomes and find that regions flanking the amylase locus show notable depression of genetic diversity both in African and non-African populations. Analysis of genetic variation in these regions supports the model of an early selective sweep in the human lineage after the split of humans from Neanderthals which led to the fixation of multiple copies of AMY1 in place of a single copy...
November 17, 2016: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27843675/evidence-for-the-paleoethnobotany-of-the-neanderthal-a-review-of-the-literature
#14
REVIEW
Gerhard P Shipley, Kelly Kindscher
Our perception of our closest human relatives, the Neanderthals, has evolved in the last few decades from brutish ape-men to intelligent archaic human peoples. Our understanding and appreciation of their cultural sophistication has only recently extended to their diet. Only within the last few years, with new techniques and a shift in focus, have we begun to truly investigate and understand the role of plants in their diet and culture. The more we learn about Neanderthals, the more we realize that biological and cultural distinctions between them and us were relatively small...
2016: Scientifica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27824859/the-strength-of-selection-against-neanderthal-introgression
#15
Ivan Juric, Simon Aeschbacher, Graham Coop
Hybridization between humans and Neanderthals has resulted in a low level of Neanderthal ancestry scattered across the genomes of many modern-day humans. After hybridization, on average, selection appears to have removed Neanderthal alleles from the human population. Quantifying the strength and causes of this selection against Neanderthal ancestry is key to understanding our relationship to Neanderthals and, more broadly, how populations remain distinct after secondary contact. Here, we develop a novel method for estimating the genome-wide average strength of selection and the density of selected sites using estimates of Neanderthal allele frequency along the genomes of modern-day humans...
November 2016: PLoS Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27808237/timing-and-causes-of-north-african-wet-phases-during-the-last-glacial-period-and-implications-for-modern-human-migration
#16
Dirk L Hoffmann, Mike Rogerson, Christoph Spötl, Marc Luetscher, Derek Vance, Anne H Osborne, Nuri M Fello, Gina E Moseley
We present the first speleothem-derived central North Africa rainfall record for the last glacial period. The record reveals three main wet periods at 65-61 ka, 52.5-50.5 ka and 37.5-33 ka that lead obliquity maxima and precession minima. We find additional minor wet episodes that are synchronous with Greenland interstadials. Our results demonstrate that sub-tropical hydrology is forced by both orbital cyclicity and North Atlantic moisture sources. The record shows that after the end of a Saharan wet phase around 70 ka ago, North Africa continued to intermittently receive substantially more rainfall than today, resulting in favourable environmental conditions for modern human expansion...
November 3, 2016: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27805907/human-and-rodent-aryl-hydrocarbon-receptor-ahr-from-mediator-of-dioxin-toxicity-to-physiologic-ahr-functions-and-therapeutic-options
#17
Karl Walter Bock
Metabolism of aryl hydrocarbons and toxicity of dioxins led to the discovery of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). Tremendous advances have been made on multiplicity of AHR signaling and identification of endogenous ligands including the tryptophan metabolites FICZ and kynurenine. However, human AHR functions are still poorly understood due to marked species differences as well as cell-type- and cell context-dependent AHR functions. Observations in dioxin-poisoned individuals may provide hints to physiologic AHR functions in humans...
December 21, 2016: Biological Chemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27783325/the-driving-forces-of-cultural-complexity-neanderthals-modern-humans-and-the-question-of-population-size
#18
Laurel Fogarty, Joe Yuichiro Wakano, Marcus W Feldman, Kenichi Aoki
The forces driving cultural accumulation in human populations, both modern and ancient, are hotly debated. Did genetic, demographic, or cognitive features of behaviorally modern humans (as opposed to, say, early modern humans or Neanderthals) allow culture to accumulate to its current, unprecedented levels of complexity? Theoretical explanations for patterns of accumulation often invoke demographic factors such as population size or density, whereas statistical analyses of variation in cultural complexity often point to the importance of environmental factors such as food stability, in determining cultural complexity...
October 25, 2016: Human Nature: An Interdisciplinary Biosocial Perspective
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27744216/the-impact-of-recent-population-history-on-the-deleterious-mutation-load-in-humans-and-close-evolutionary-relatives
#19
REVIEW
Yuval B Simons, Guy Sella
Over the past decade, there has been both great interest and confusion about whether recent demographic events-notably the Out-of-Africa-bottleneck and recent population growth-have led to differences in mutation load among human populations. The confusion can be traced to the use of different summary statistics to measure load, which lead to apparently conflicting results. We argue, however, that when statistics more directly related to load are used, the results of different studies and data sets consistently reveal little or no difference in the load of non-synonymous mutations among human populations...
December 2016: Current Opinion in Genetics & Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27719693/the-most-brutal-of-human-skulls-measuring-and-knowing-the-first-neanderthal
#20
Paige Madison
A fossilized skeleton discovered in 1856 presented naturalists with a unique challenge. The strange, human-looking bones of the first recognized Neanderthal confronted naturalists with a new type of object for which they had no readily available interpretive framework. This paper explores the techniques and approaches used to understand these bones in the years immediately following the discovery, in particular 1856-1864. Historians have previously suggested that interpretations and debates about Neanderthals hinged primarily on social, political and cultural ideologies...
September 2016: British Journal for the History of Science
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