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Robert S Wilson, Ana W Capuano, Lei Yu, Jingyun Yang, Namhee Kim, Sue E Leurgans, Melissa Lamar, Julie A Schneider, David A Bennett, Patricia A Boyle
Retest learning impacts estimates of cognitive aging, but its bases are uncertain. Here, we test the hypothesis that dementia-related neurodegeneration impairs retest learning. Older persons without cognitive impairment at enrollment (n = 567) had annual cognitive testing for a mean of 11 years, died, and had a neuropathologic examination to quantify 5 neurodegenerative pathologies. Change point models were used to divide cognitive trajectories into an early retest sensitive component and a later component less sensitive to retest...
March 17, 2018: Neurobiology of Aging
Elizabeth M White, Jessica G Smith, Rebecca L Trotta, Matthew D McHugh
OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether care in a hospital with more nurses holding at least a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree is associated with lower mortality for individuals with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias (ADRD) undergoing surgery ADRD. DESIGN: Cross-sectional data from 2006-07 Medicare claims were linked with the Multi-State Nursing Care and Patient Safety Survey of nurses in 4 states. SETTING: Adult, nonfederal, acute care hospitals in California, Florida, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania (N=531)...
March 20, 2018: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
Sabato Santaniello, John T Gale, Sridevi V Sarma
Over the last 30 years, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been used to treat chronic neurological diseases like dystonia, obsessive-compulsive disorders, essential tremor, Parkinson's disease, and more recently, dementias, depression, cognitive disorders, and epilepsy. Despite its wide use, DBS presents numerous challenges for both clinicians and engineers. One challenge is the design of novel, more efficient DBS therapies, which are hampered by the lack of complete understanding about the cellular mechanisms of therapeutic DBS...
March 20, 2018: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews. Systems Biology and Medicine
Sven Haller, Meike W Vernooij, Joost P A Kuijer, Elna-Marie Larsson, Hans Rolf Jäger, Frederik Barkhof
Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs), also referred to as microhemorrhages, appear on magnetic resonance (MR) images as hypointense foci notably at T2*-weighted or susceptibility-weighted (SW) imaging. CMBs are detected with increasing frequency because of the more widespread use of high magnetic field strength and of newer dedicated MR imaging techniques such as three-dimensional gradient-echo T2*-weighted and SW imaging. The imaging appearance of CMBs is mainly because of changes in local magnetic susceptibility and reflects the pathologic iron accumulation, most often in perivascular macrophages, because of vasculopathy...
April 2018: Radiology
Tanuj Sharma, Mohammad Imran Siddiqi
Unique intrinsic properties of peptides like low toxicity, high biological activity and specificity make them attractive therapeutic agents. PDZ binding peptide inhibitors have been demonstrated for curing of Alzheimer, Parkinson, Dementia and other central nervous system ailments. In this article, we report the successful use of an integrated computational protocol to analyze the structural basis of how peptides bind to the shallow groove of the third PDZ domain (PDZ3) from the Post Synaptic Density (PSD-95) protein...
March 20, 2018: Journal of Biomolecular Structure & Dynamics
Hitoshi Okazawa
Tau phosphorylation has come into the limelight again, this time as a critical player in the earliest stages of dementia pathology. Mislocalization of phosphorylated tau to dendritic spines and the resultant degeneration of synapses are observed across multiple neurodegenerative diseases, even in the absence of tau aggregation. Moreover, other molecules phosphorylated by the same kinases, such as MARCKS, might contribute to ultra-early phase pathology by promoting synapse dysfunction.
March 20, 2018: ACS Chemical Neuroscience
James D Weinstein
Despite decades of research, at present there is no curative therapy for Alzheimer's disease. Changes in the way new drugs are tested appear to be necessary. Three changes are presented here and will be discussed. The first change is that Alzheimer's disease must be considered a disease of four major pathological processes, not one. The four processes are: 1) vascular hypoperfusion of the brain with associated mitochondrial dysfunction, 2) destructive protein inclusions, 3) uncontrolled oxidative stress, and 4) proinflammatory immune processes secondary to microglial and astrocytic dysfunction in the brain...
February 2018: Neural Regeneration Research
Keith A Anderson, Charlotte M Siegel
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 1, 2018: Journal of Applied Gerontology: the Official Journal of the Southern Gerontological Society
Andreas Braun, Daksha P Trivedi, Angela Dickinson, Laura Hamilton, Claire Goodman, Heather Gage, Kunle Ashaye, Steve Iliffe, Jill Manthorpe
Background People living with dementia often develop distressing behavioural and psychological symptoms (BPSD) that can affect their quality of life and the capacity of family carers and staff providing support at home. This systematic review of qualitative studies considers the views and experiences of people living with dementia and care providers about these symptoms and what helps to reduce their impact. Methods The two-stage review involved (a) An initial mapping of the literature to understand the range of BPSD, and how it is operationalised by different groups, to develop a search strategy; (b) A search of electronic databases from January 2000 to March 2015, updated in October 2016...
January 1, 2018: Dementia
Daksha P Trivedi, Andreas Braun, Angela Dickinson, Heather Gage, Laura Hamilton, Claire Goodman, Kunle Ashaye, Steve Iliffe, Jill Manthorpe
Background Two-thirds of people living with dementia live at home in the UK and many experience distressing behavioural and psychological symptoms. This systematic review evaluates the effectiveness of non-pharmacological interventions for behavioural and psychological symptoms among community-dwelling people living with dementia. Methods This two-stage review undertook an initial mapping of the literature followed by a systematic review of relevant randomised controlled trials. We searched electronic databases for pertinent studies reporting outcomes from interventions from January 2000 to March 2015 and updated searches in October 2016...
January 1, 2018: Dementia
Beata Peplonska, Mariusz Berdynski, Monika Mandecka, Anna Barczak, Magdalena Kuzma-Kozakiewicz, Maria Barcikowska, Cezary Zekanowski
Activation of the TREM2 receptor on microglia stimulates phagocytosis and decreases the microglial proinflammatory response. Mutations in exon 2 of the TREM2 gene have been reported to be associated with various neurodegenerative diseases characterized by chronic inflammation. The aim of our study was to evaluate exon 2 of TREM2 gene variants as a putative genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in the Polish population. The results were interpreted using previously published data, especially highlighting differences in the prevalence of the variants among Caucasian subpopulations across different geographic regions...
March 20, 2018: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Degeneration
Alberto Avolio, Mi Ok Kim, Audrey Adji, Sumudu Gangoda, Bhargava Avadhanam, Isabella Tan, Mark Butlin
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Concepts of pulsatile arterial haemodynamics, including relationships between oscillatory blood pressure and flow in systemic arteries, arterial stiffness and wave propagation phenomena have provided basic understanding of underlying haemodynamic mechanisms associated with elevated arterial blood pressure as a major factor of cardiovascular risk, particularly the deleterious effects of isolated systolic hypertension in the elderly. This topical review assesses the effects of pulsatility of blood pressure and flow in the systemic arteries on the brain...
March 19, 2018: Current Hypertension Reports
Yongming Pan, Jianqin Xu, Cheng Chen, Fangming Chen, Ping Jin, Keyan Zhu, Chenyue W Hu, Mengmeng You, Minli Chen, Fuliang Hu
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia characterized by aggregation of amyloid β (Aβ) and neuronal loss. One of the risk factors for AD is high cholesterol levels, which are known to promote Aβ deposition. Previous studies have shown that royal jelly (RJ), a product of worker bees, has potential neuroprotective effects and can attenuate Aβ toxicity. However, little is known about how RJ regulates Aβ formation and its effects on cholesterol levels and neuronal metabolic activities...
2018: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience
Dona M P Jayakody, Peter L Friedland, Ralph N Martins, Hamid R Sohrabi
Age-related hearing loss (ARHL), presbycusis, is a chronic health condition that affects approximately one-third of the world's population. The peripheral and central hearing alterations associated with age-related hearing loss have a profound impact on perception of verbal and non-verbal auditory stimuli. The high prevalence of hearing loss in the older adults corresponds to the increased frequency of dementia in this population. Therefore, researchers have focused their attention on age-related central effects that occur independent of the peripheral hearing loss as well as central effects of peripheral hearing loss and its association with cognitive decline and dementia...
2018: Frontiers in Neuroscience
Matthew A White, Eosu Kim, Amanda Duffy, Robert Adalbert, Benjamin U Phillips, Owen M Peters, Jodie Stephenson, Sujeong Yang, Francesca Massenzio, Ziqiang Lin, Simon Andrews, Anne Segonds-Pichon, Jake Metterville, Lisa M Saksida, Richard Mead, Richard R Ribchester, Youssef Barhomi, Thomas Serre, Michael P Coleman, Justin Fallon, Timothy J Bussey, Robert H Brown, Jemeen Sreedharan
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-frontotemporal dementia (ALS-FTD) constitutes a devastating disease spectrum characterized by 43-kDa TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP-43) pathology. Understanding how TDP-43 contributes to neurodegeneration will help direct therapeutic efforts. Here we have created a TDP-43 knock-in mouse with a human-equivalent mutation in the endogenous mouse Tardbp gene. TDP-43Q331K mice demonstrate cognitive dysfunction and a paucity of parvalbumin interneurons. Critically, TDP-43 autoregulation is perturbed, leading to a gain of TDP-43 function and altered splicing of Mapt, another pivotal dementia-associated gene...
March 19, 2018: Nature Neuroscience
Tatsuhiro Ayabe, Rena Ohya, Keiji Kondo, Yasuhisa Ano
Dementia and cognitive decline have become worldwide public health problems, and it was recently reported that life-style related diseases and obesity are key risk factors in dementia. Iso-α-acids, hop-derived bitter components of beer, have been reported to have various physiological functions via activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ. In this report, we demonstrated that daily intake of iso-α-acids suppresses inflammations in the hippocampus and improves cognitive decline induced by high fat diet (HFD)...
March 19, 2018: Scientific Reports
Stéphanie Philtjens, Sara Van Mossevelde, Julie van der Zee, Eline Wauters, Lubina Dillen, Mathieu Vandenbulcke, Rik Vandenberghe, Adrian Ivanoiu, Anne Sieben, Christiana Willems, Luisa Benussi, Roberta Ghidoni, Giuliano Binetti, Barbara Borroni, Alessandro Padovani, Pau Pastor, Monica Diez-Fairen, Miquel Aguilar, Alexandre de Mendonça, Gabriel Miltenberger-Miltényi, Isabel Hernández, Merce Boada, Agustín Ruiz, Benedetta Nacmias, Sandro Sorbi, Maria Rosário Almeida, Isabel Santana, Jordi Clarimón, Alberto Lleó, Giovanni B Frisoni, Raquel Sanchez-Valle, Albert Lladó, Estrella Gómez-Tortosa, Ellen Gelpi, Marleen Van den Broeck, Karin Peeters, Patrick Cras, Peter P De Deyn, Sebastiaan Engelborghs, Marc Cruts, Christine Van Broeckhoven
We investigated the genetic role of sortilin (SORT1) in frontotemporal dementia (FTD). SORT1 is the neuronal receptor for granulin, encoded by the progranulin gene (GRN), a major causal gene for inherited FTD. In Belgian cohorts of 636 FTD patients and 1066 unaffected control individuals, we identified 5 patient-only nonsynonymous rare variants in SORT1. Rare variant burden analysis showed a significant increase in rare coding variants in patients compared to control individuals (p = 0.04), particularly in the β-propeller domain (p = 0...
February 17, 2018: Neurobiology of Aging
Sven J van der Lee, Frank J Wolters, M Kamran Ikram, Albert Hofman, M Arfan Ikram, Najaf Amin, Cornelia M van Duijn
BACKGROUND: Alzheimer's disease is one of the most heritable diseases in elderly people and the most common type of dementia. In addition to the major genetic determinant of Alzheimer's disease, the APOE gene, 23 genetic variants have been associated with the disease. We assessed the effects of these variants and APOE on cumulative risk and age at onset of Alzheimer's disease and all-cause dementia. METHODS: We studied incident dementia in cognitively healthy participants (aged >45 years) from the community-based Rotterdam Study, an ongoing prospective cohort study based in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, focusing on neurological, cardiovascular, endocrine, and ophthalmological disorders, and other diseases in elderly people...
March 16, 2018: Lancet Neurology
Stephanie Wong, Muireann Irish, Michael Hornberger
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 27, 2018: Cortex; a Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior
Francesca Pistollato, Ruben Calderón Iglesias, Roberto Ruiz, Silvia Aparicio, Jorge Crespo, Luis Dzul Lopez, Piera Pia Manna, Francesca Giampieri, Maurizio Battino
Ample epidemiological evidence suggests a strong correlation among diet, lifestyle factors and the onset and consolidation of dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD). It has been demonstrated that AD, diabetes, obesity, insulin resistance, and cardiovascular disease are strongly interconnected pathologies. Preventive strategies and nutritional interventions seem to be promising approaches to delay neurocognitive decline and reduce the risk of AD and other non-psychiatric co-morbidities. In this regard, healthy dietary patterns, characterized by high intake of plant-based foods, probiotics, antioxidants, soy beans, nuts, and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and a low intake of saturated fats, animal-derived proteins, and refined sugars, have been shown to decrease the risk of neurocognitive impairments and eventually the onset of AD...
March 16, 2018: Pharmacological Research: the Official Journal of the Italian Pharmacological Society
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