keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Homeostatic plasticity

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28804447/activity-dependent-arc-expression-and-homeostatic-synaptic-plasticity-are-altered-in-neurons-from-a-mouse-model-of-angelman-syndrome
#1
Elissa D Pastuzyn, Jason D Shepherd
Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that results from deletions or mutations in chromosome 15, which usually includes the UBE3A gene. Ube3A protein is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that ubiquitinates proteins and targets them for degradation. The immediate-early gene Arc, a master regulator of synaptic plasticity, was identified as a putative substrate of Ube3A, but there have been conflicting reports on whether Arc is a bona fide E3 ligase substrate. Using multiple approaches, we found no evidence for a physical interaction between Arc and Ube3A in vivo...
2017: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28790889/the-calcineurin-binding-activity-dependent-splice-variant-dynamin1xb-is-highly-enriched-in-synapses-in-various-regions-of-the-central-nervous-system
#2
Marie-Lisa Eich, Ekta Dembla, Silke Wahl, Mayur Dembla, Karin Schwarz, Frank Schmitz
In the present study, we generated and characterized a splice site-specific monoclonal antibody that selectively detects the calcineurin-binding dynamin1 splice variant dynamin1xb. Calcineurin is a Ca(2+)-regulated phosphatase that enhances dynamin1 activity and is an important Ca(2+)-sensing mediator of homeostatic synaptic plasticity in neurons. Using this dynamin1xb-specific antibody, we found dynamin1xb highly enriched in synapses of all analyzed brain regions. In photoreceptor ribbon synapses, dynamin1xb was enriched in close vicinity to the synaptic ribbon in a manner indicative of a peri-active zone immunolabeling...
2017: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28783732/correction-of-aberrant-growth-preserves-tissue-homeostasis
#3
Samara Brown, Cristiana M Pineda, Tianchi Xin, Jonathan Boucher, Kathleen C Suozzi, Sangbum Park, Catherine Matte-Martone, David G Gonzalez, Julie Rytlewski, Slobodan Beronja, Valentina Greco
Cells in healthy tissues acquire mutations with surprising frequency. Many of these mutations are associated with abnormal cellular behaviours such as differentiation defects and hyperproliferation, yet fail to produce macroscopically detectable phenotypes. It is currently unclear how the tissue remains phenotypically normal, despite the presence of these mutant cells. Here we use intravital imaging to track the fate of mouse skin epithelium burdened with varying numbers of activated Wnt/β-catenin stem cells...
August 2, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28782263/regulation-of-synaptic-scaling-by-action-potential-independent-miniature-neurotransmission
#4
REVIEW
Carlos Gonzalez-Islas, Pernille Bülow, Peter Wenner
Synaptic scaling represents a homeostatic adjustment in synaptic strength that was first identified as a cell-wide mechanism to achieve firing rate homeostasis after perturbations to spiking activity levels. In this review, we consider a form of synaptic scaling that is triggered by changes in action potential-independent neurotransmitter release. This plasticity appears to be both triggered and expressed locally at the dendritic site of the synapse that experiences a perturbation. A discussion of different forms of scaling triggered by different perturbations is presented...
August 7, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28768764/src-homology-2-domain-containing-phosphotyrosine-phosphatase-2-shp2-controls-surface-glua1-in-synaptic-homeostasis
#5
Bin Zhang, Wen Lu
Src Homology 2 Domain Containing Phosphotyrosine Phosphatase 2 (Shp2) functions in synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. However, the precise mechanisms by which this multifunctional protein contributes to synaptic function remains largely unknown. Homeostatic plasticity may be viewed as a process of bi-directional synaptic scaling, up or down. Through this process neuronal circuitry stability is maintained so that changes in synaptic strength may be preserved under changing conditions. Better understanding of these processes is needed...
August 2, 2017: Journal of Biological Chemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28767646/a-model-of-human-motor-sequence-learning-explains-facilitation-and-interference-effects-based-on-spike-timing-dependent-plasticity
#6
Quan Wang, Constantin A Rothkopf, Jochen Triesch
The ability to learn sequential behaviors is a fundamental property of our brains. Yet a long stream of studies including recent experiments investigating motor sequence learning in adult human subjects have produced a number of puzzling and seemingly contradictory results. In particular, when subjects have to learn multiple action sequences, learning is sometimes impaired by proactive and retroactive interference effects. In other situations, however, learning is accelerated as reflected in facilitation and transfer effects...
August 2017: PLoS Computational Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28751459/pten-loss-increases-the-connectivity-of-fast-synaptic-motifs-and-functional-connectivity-in-a-developing-hippocampal-network
#7
Caitlynn M Barrows, Matthew P McCabe, Hongmei Chen, John W Swann, Matthew C Weston
Changes in synaptic strength and connectivity are thought to be a major mechanism through which many gene variants cause neurological disease. Hyperactivation of the PI3K-mTOR signaling network, via loss of function of repressors such as PTEN, causes epilepsy in humans and animal models, and altered mTOR signaling may contribute to a broad range of neurological diseases. Changes in synaptic transmission have been reported in animal models of PTEN loss; however, the full extent of these changes, and their effect on network function, is still unknown...
July 27, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28739527/deconstructing-the-cortical-column-in-the-barrel-cortex
#8
Kevin Fox
The question of what function is served by the cortical column has occupied neuroscientists since its original description some 60 years ago. The answer seems tractable in the somatosensory cortex when considering the inputs to the cortical column and the early stages of information processing, but quickly breaks down once the multiplicity of output streams and their sub-circuits are brought into consideration. This article describes the early stages of information processing in the barrel cortex, through generation of the centre and surround receptive field components of neurones that subserve integration of multi whisker information, before going on to consider the diversity of properties exhibited by the layer 5 output neurones...
July 21, 2017: Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28726641/a-plant-fungal-type-phosphoenolpyruvate-carboxykinase-located-in-the-parasite-mitochondrion-ensures-glucose-independent-survival-of-toxoplasma-gondii
#9
Richard Nitzsche, Özlem Günay-Esiyok, Maximilian Tischer, Vyacheslav Zagoriy, Nishith Gupta
Toxoplasma gondii is considered as one of the most successful intracellular pathogens, because it can reproduce in varied nutritional milieus, encountered in diverse host-cell types of essentially any warm-blooded organism. Our earlier work has demonstrated that the acute (tachyzoite) stage of T. gondii depends on cooperativity of glucose and glutamine catabolism to meet biosynthetic demands. Either of these two nutrients can sustain the parasite survival; however, what determines the metabolic plasticity has not been resolved yet...
July 18, 2017: Journal of Biological Chemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28700936/alternative-splicing-of-p-q-type-ca-2-channels-shapes-presynaptic-plasticity
#10
Agnes Thalhammer, Andrea Contestabile, Yaroslav S Ermolyuk, Teclise Ng, Kirill E Volynski, Tuck Wah Soong, Yukiko Goda, Lorenzo A Cingolani
Alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs is prominent in the mammalian brain, where it is thought to expand proteome diversity. For example, alternative splicing of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel (VGCC) α1 subunits can generate thousands of isoforms with differential properties and expression patterns. However, the impact of this molecular diversity on brain function, particularly on synaptic transmission, which crucially depends on VGCCs, is unclear. Here, we investigate how two major splice isoforms of P/Q-type VGCCs (Cav2...
July 11, 2017: Cell Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28686870/intestinal-enteroendocrine-lineage-cells-possess-homeostatic-and-injury-inducible-stem-cell-activity
#11
Kelley S Yan, Olivier Gevaert, Grace X Y Zheng, Benedict Anchang, Christopher S Probert, Kathryn A Larkin, Paige S Davies, Zhuan-Fen Cheng, John S Kaddis, Arnold Han, Kelly Roelf, Ruben I Calderon, Esther Cynn, Xiaoyi Hu, Komal Mandleywala, Julie Wilhelmy, Sue M Grimes, David C Corney, Stéphane C Boutet, Jessica M Terry, Phillip Belgrader, Solongo B Ziraldo, Tarjei S Mikkelsen, Fengchao Wang, Richard J von Furstenberg, Nicholas R Smith, Parthasarathy Chandrakesan, Randal May, Mary Ann S Chrissy, Rajan Jain, Christine A Cartwright, Joyce C Niland, Young-Kwon Hong, Jill Carrington, David T Breault, Jonathan Epstein, Courtney W Houchen, John P Lynch, Martin G Martin, Sylvia K Plevritis, Christina Curtis, Hanlee P Ji, Linheng Li, Susan J Henning, Melissa H Wong, Calvin J Kuo
Several cell populations have been reported to possess intestinal stem cell (ISC) activity during homeostasis and injury-induced regeneration. Here, we explored inter-relationships between putative mouse ISC populations by comparative RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq). The transcriptomes of multiple cycling ISC populations closely resembled Lgr5(+) ISCs, the most well-defined ISC pool, but Bmi1-GFP(+) cells were distinct and enriched for enteroendocrine (EE) markers, including Prox1. Prox1-GFP(+) cells exhibited sustained clonogenic growth in vitro, and lineage-tracing of Prox1(+) cells revealed long-lived clones during homeostasis and after radiation-induced injury in vivo...
July 6, 2017: Cell Stem Cell
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28658618/a-presynaptic-glutamate-receptor-subunit-confers-robustness-to-neurotransmission-and-homeostatic-potentiation
#12
Beril Kiragasi, Joyce Wondolowski, Yan Li, Dion K Dickman
Homeostatic signaling systems are thought to interface with other forms of plasticity to ensure flexible yet stable levels of neurotransmission. The role of neurotransmitter receptors in this process, beyond mediating neurotransmission itself, is not known. Through a forward genetic screen, we have identified the Drosophila kainate-type ionotropic glutamate receptor subunit DKaiR1D to be required for the retrograde, homeostatic potentiation of synaptic strength. DKaiR1D is necessary in presynaptic motor neurons, localized near active zones, and confers robustness to the calcium sensitivity of baseline synaptic transmission...
June 27, 2017: Cell Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28642683/object-phobia-and-altered-rhoa-signaling-in-amygdala-of-mice-lacking-rich2
#13
Tasnuva Sarowar, Stefanie Grabrucker, Tobias M Boeckers, Andreas M Grabrucker
RICH2 knockout (RICH2 KO) mice exhibit neophobia in the novel object test. To gain further insight into their anxiety-related phenotype, we subjected these mice to additional behavioral tests to elucidate whether the behavioral abnormality in these mice is a consequence of reduced exploratory motivation, and whether the neophobia is linked specifically to objects or also present for other modalities. RICH2 KO mice engage in normal exploration in a novel environment, suggesting that the anxiety-related phenotype is not due to reduced exploratory drive...
2017: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28639593/synaptic-roles-of-cyclin-dependent-kinase-5-its-implications-in-epilepsy
#14
REVIEW
Aparna Banerjee Dixit, Jyotirmoy Banerjee, Manjari Tripathi, Chitra Sarkar, P Sarat Chandra
There is an urgent need to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying epilepsy to find novel prognostic/diagnostic biomarkers to prevent epilepsy patients at risk. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) is involved in multiple neuronal functions and plays a crucial role in maintaining homeostatic synaptic plasticity by regulating intracellular signalling cascades at synapses. CDK5 deregulation is shown to be associated with various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. The association between chronic loss of CDK5 and seizures has been reported in animal models of epilepsy...
February 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28632905/the-malleable-brain-plasticity-of-neural-circuits-and-behavior-a-review-from-students-to-students
#15
REVIEW
Natascha Schaefer, Carola Rotermund, Eva-Maria Blumrich, Mychael V Lourenco, Pooja Joshi, Regina U Hegemann, Sumit Jamwal, Nilufar Ali, Ezra Michelet García Romero, Sorabh Sharma, Shampa Ghosh, Jitendra K Sinha, Hannah Loke, Vishal Jain, Katarzyna Lepeta, Ahmad Salamian, Mahima Sharma, Mojtaba Golpich, Katarzyna Nawrotek, Ramesh K Paidi, Sheila M Shahidzadeh, Tetsade Piermartiri, Elham Amini, Veronica Pastor, Yvette Wilson, Philip A Adeniyi, Ashok K Datusalia, Benham Vafadari, Vedangana Saini, Edna Suárez-Pozos, Neetu Kushwah, Paula Fontanet, Anthony J Turner
One of the most intriguing features of the brain is its ability to be malleable, allowing it to adapt continually to changes in the environment. Specific neuronal activity patterns drive long-lasting increases or decreases in the strength of synaptic connections, referred to as long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) respectively. Such phenomena have been described in a variety of model organisms, which are used to study molecular, structural, and functional aspects of synaptic plasticity...
June 20, 2017: Journal of Neurochemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28630298/hypocretin-orexin-is-critical-in-sustaining-theta-gamma-rich-waking-behaviors-that-drive-sleep-need
#16
Anne Vassalli, Paul Franken
Hcrt gene inactivation in mice leads to behavioral state instability, abnormal transitions to paradoxical sleep, and cataplexy, hallmarks of narcolepsy. Sleep homeostasis is, however, considered unimpaired in patients and narcoleptic mice. We find that whereas Hcrt(ko/ko) mice respond to 6-h sleep deprivation (SD) with a slow-wave sleep (SWS) EEG δ (1.0 to 4.0 Hz) power rebound like WT littermates, spontaneous waking fails to induce a δ power reflecting prior waking duration. This correlates with impaired θ (6...
July 3, 2017: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28621662/chronic-lithium-treatment-elicits-its-antimanic-effects-via-bdnf-trkb-dependent-synaptic-downscaling
#17
Erinn S Gideons, Pei-Yi Lin, Melissa Mahgoub, Ege T Kavalali, Lisa M Monteggia
Lithium is widely used as a treatment for Bipolar Disorder although the molecular mechanisms that underlie its therapeutic effects are under debate. In this study, we show brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is required for the antimanic-like effects of lithium but not the antidepressant-like effects in mice. We performed whole cell patch clamp recordings of hippocampal neurons to determine the impact of lithium on synaptic transmission that may underlie the behavioral effects. Lithium produced a significant decrease in α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR)-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (mEPSC) amplitudes due to postsynaptic homeostatic plasticity that was dependent on BDNF and its receptor tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB)...
June 16, 2017: ELife
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28621434/eea1-restores-homeostatic-synaptic-plasticity-in-hippocampal-neurons-from-rett-syndrome-mice
#18
Xin Xu, Lucas Pozzo-Miller
KEY POINTS: Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in MECP2, the gene encoding the transcriptional regulator methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Mecp2 deletion in mice results in an imbalance of excitation and inhibition in hippocampal neurons, which affects 'Hebbian' synaptic plasticity. We show that Mecp2-deficient neurons also lack homeostatic synaptic plasticity, likely due to reduced levels of EEA1, a protein involved in AMPA receptor endocytosis...
August 15, 2017: Journal of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28616064/plasticity-in-gene-transcription-explains-the-differential-performance-of-two-invasive-fish-species
#19
Kyle W Wellband, Daniel D Heath
Phenotypic plasticity buffers organisms from environmental change and is hypothesized to aid the initial establishment of nonindigenous species in novel environments and postestablishment range expansion. The genetic mechanisms that underpin phenotypically plastic traits are generally poorly characterized; however, there is strong evidence that modulation of gene transcription is an important component of these responses. Here, we use RNA sequencing to examine the transcriptional basis of temperature tolerance for round and tubenose goby, two nonindigenous fish species that differ dramatically in the extent of their Great Lakes invasions despite similar invasion dates...
July 2017: Evolutionary Applications
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28611571/exosomes-and-homeostatic-synaptic-plasticity-are-linked-to-each-other-and-to-huntington-s-parkinson-s-and-other-neurodegenerative-diseases-by-database-enabled-analyses-of-comprehensively-curated-datasets
#20
James K T Wang, Peter Langfelder, Steve Horvath, Michael J Palazzolo
Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive and autosomal dominant neurodegeneration caused by CAG expansion in the huntingtin gene (HTT), but the pathophysiological mechanism of mutant HTT (mHTT) remains unclear. To study HD using systems biological methodologies on all published data, we undertook the first comprehensive curation of two key PubMed HD datasets: perturbation genes that impact mHTT-driven endpoints and therefore are putatively linked causally to pathogenic mechanisms, and the protein interactome of HTT that reflects its biology...
2017: Frontiers in Neuroscience
keyword
keyword
11714
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"