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Anna Chung-Kwan Tse, Jing-Woei Li, Simon Yuan Wang, Ting-Fung Chan, Keng Po Lai, Rudolf Shiu-Sun Wu
Hypoxia is a global environmental concern and poses a significant threat to aquatic ecosystems, including the sustainability of natural fish populations. The deleterious effects of hypoxia on fish reproductive fitness, as mediated by disruption of sex hormones and gene expression along the Brain-Pituitary-Gonad axis, have been well documented. Recently, we further demonstrated that the observed disruption of steroidogenesis in the ovary of marine medaka Oryzias melastigma is mediated through microRNAs (miRNAs)...
October 8, 2016: Aquatic Toxicology
Jasmine S Berg, Dolma Michellod, Petra Pjevac, Clara Martinez-Perez, Caroline R T Buckner, Philipp F Hach, Carsten J Schubert, Jana Milucka, Marcel M M Kuypers
Iron redox reactions play an important role in carbon remineralization, supporting large microbial communities in iron-rich terrestrial and aquatic sediments. Stratified water columns with comparably low iron concentrations are globally widespread, but microbial iron cycling in these systems has largely been ignored. We found evidence for unexpectedly high iron turnover rates in the low (1-2 µmol·l(-1) ) iron waters of Lake Cadagno. Light-dependent, biological iron oxidation rates (1.4-13.8 µmol·l(-1) ·d(-1) ) were even higher than in ferruginous lakes with well-studied microbial iron cycles...
October 21, 2016: Environmental Microbiology
Dirk Louis P Schorkopf, Christos G Spanoudis, Leonard E G Mboera, Agenor Mafra-Neto, Rickard Ignell, Teun Dekker
BACKGROUND: There is a global need for cost-effective and environmentally friendly tools for control of mosquitoes and mosquito-borne diseases. One potential way to achieve this is to combine already available tools to gain synergistic effects to reduce vector mosquito populations. Another possible way to improve mosquito control is to extend the active period of a given control agent, enabling less frequent applications and consequently, more efficient and longer lasting vector population suppression...
October 2016: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Ji-Feng Yang, Li-Ming Yang, Guang-Guo Ying, Cheng-Bin Liu, Li-Ying Zheng, Sheng-Lian Luo
Sulfonamide antibiotics are often detected in terrestrial and aquatic environment, but little is known about abiotic degradation of these antibiotics. In the present study, the degradation of the sulfonamide antibiotic sulfadiazine by a synthesized δ-MnO2 was investigated. The initial reaction rate of sulfadiazine oxidized by manganese dioxide increased as the solution pH decreased by weakening electrostatic attraction between sulfadiazine and MnO2 and enhancing the reduction potential of MnO2. The presence of metal ions (Mn(2+), Na(+) and Ca(2+)), especially Mn(2+), decreased the initial reaction rate by competitively adsorbing and reacting with MnO2...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part A, Toxic/hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering
T Fatima Mitterboeck, Jinzhong Fu, Sarah J Adamowicz
Insect lineages have crossed between terrestrial and aquatic habitats many times, for both immature and adult life stages. We explore patterns in molecular evolutionary rates between 42 sister pairs of related terrestrial and freshwater insect clades using publicly available protein-coding DNA sequence data from the orders Coleoptera, Diptera, Lepidoptera, Hemiptera, Mecoptera, Trichoptera, and Neuroptera. We furthermore test for habitat-associated convergent molecular evolution in the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene in general and at a particular amino acid site previously reported to exhibit habitat-linked convergence within an aquatic beetle group...
August 19, 2016: Genome Génome / Conseil National de Recherches Canada
Xiaotong Cao, Jianquan Luo, John M Woodley, Yinhua Wan
Micro-pollutants present in water have many detrimental effects on the ecosystem. Membrane technology plays an important role in the removal of micro-pollutants but there remain significant challenges such as concentration polarization, membrane fouling and variable permeate quality. The work reported here uses a multifunctional membrane with rejection, adsorption and catalysis functions to solve these problems. Based on mussel-inspired chemistry and biological membrane properties, a multifunctional membrane was prepared by applying 'reverse filtration' of a laccase solution and subsequent 'dopamine coating' on a nanofiltration (NF) membrane support, which was tested on bisphenol A (BPA) removal...
October 21, 2016: ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
J Arie Vonk, Bernd F van Kuijk, Mick van Beusekom, Ellard R Hunting, Michiel H S Kraak
Chemical composition of organic matter (OM) is a key driver for detritus consumption by macroinvertebrates and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) content is considered a candidate indicator of food palatability. Since traditionally used complex natural OM covaries in many quality attributes, it remains uncertain whether benthic invertebrates developed an actual preference for PUFA-rich food. Therefore we aimed to test the influence of the PUFA linoleic acid on OM consumption by aquatic macroinvertebrates using standardized surrogate substrates (decomposition and consumption tablet, DECOTAB) with added linoleic acid (PUFA) in comparison to consumption of DECOTAB containing only cellulose (Standard) or ground macrophytes (Plant)...
October 21, 2016: Scientific Reports
Kai Yang, Gangfeng Liu, Jihong Yan, Tao Wang, Xinbin Zhang, Jie Zhao
The highly efficient and agile water-surface locomotion of water striders has attracted substantial research attention. Compared with imitating the horizontal rowing motion, imitating the jumping capability of water striders is much more challenging because the strong interaction in the jumping process easily causes the robot to sink. This study focuses on designing a miniature robot capable of continuously jumping on the water surface. A spring-based actuating mechanism is proposed to produce a large jumping force...
October 21, 2016: Bioinspiration & Biomimetics
Nele Van den Eede, Ana Ballesteros-Gómez, Hugo Neels, Adrian Covaci
Aryl phosphate flame retardants (aryl-PFRs), such as triphenyl phosphate (TPHP) and 2-ethylhexyl diphenyl phosphate (EHDPHP), are emerging contaminants that can exhibit toxic properties, including severe aquatic toxicity and endocrine disruptive effects. Monitoring exposure to aryl-PFRs through specific biomarkers is necessary to assess the health risk associated with chronic exposure. Hydrolytic serum enzymes could play an important role in the formation of the hydrolysis product diphenyl phosphate (DPHP), the seemingly most abundant in vivo biomarker of TPHP in urine...
October 21, 2016: Environmental Science & Technology
Zengqiang Zhang, Jim J Wang, Amjad Ali, Ronald D DeLaune
The seasonal variation in physico-chemical properties, anions, and the heavy metal (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn) concentration was evaluated in water from nine different rivers in Lake Pontchartrain Basin, Louisiana, USA. The water quality parameters were compared with toxicity reference values (TRV), US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) drinking/aquatic life protection, and WHO standards. Among physico-chemical properties, pH, DO, and turbidity were high during spring, while, EC, temperature, and DOC were high during summer and vice versa...
November 2016: Environmental Monitoring and Assessment
Jeffrey N Zeyl, Carol E Johnston
Early amphibious tetrapods may have detected aquatic sound pressure using sound-induced lung vibrations, but their lack of tympanic middle ears would have restricted aerial sensitivity. Sharing these characteristics, salamanders could be models for the carryover of auditory function across an aquatic-terrestrial boundary without tympanic middle ears. We measured amphibious auditory evoked potential audiograms in five phylogenetically and ecologically distinct salamanders (Amphiuma means, Notophthalmus viridescens, Ambystoma talpoideum, Eurycea spp...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
Vahid Noroozi Karbasdehi, Sina Dobaradaran, Iraj Nabipour, Afshin Ostovar, Amir Vazirizadeh, Masoumeh Ravanipour, Shahrokh Nazmara, Mozhgan Keshtkar, Roghayeh Mirahmadi, Mohsen Noorinezhad
BACKGROUND: The present work was designed to detect heavy metal contents of Al, Zn, Fe, Mn, Ni, V, Co, Cr and Cu in sediments and shells of the Trachycardium lacunosum collected in polluted and unpolluted areas along the Persian Gulf. METHODS: The samples were taken from surface sediments (0-10 cm) and shells of Trachycardium lacunosum in two separated areas (polluted and unpolluted) in northern part of the Persian Gulf, Asaluyeh Bay, during summer 2013. The prepared samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES)...
2016: Journal of Environmental Health Science & Engineering
Débora Claësson, Tobias Wang, Hans Malte
Global warming results in increasing water temperature, which may represent a threat to aquatic ectotherms. The rising temperature affects ecology through physiology, by exerting a direct limiting effect on the individual. The mechanism controlling individual thermal tolerance is still elusive, but some evidence shows that the heart plays a central role, and that insufficient transport of oxygen to the respiring tissues may determine the thermal tolerance of animals. In this study, the influence of the heart in thermal limitation was investigated by measurements of aerobic scope in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) together with measurements of cardiac output during rest and activity...
2016: Conservation Physiology
K B Michel, P Aerts, S Van Wassenbergh
Few vertebrates capture prey in both the aquatic and the terrestrial environment due to the conflicting biophysical demands of feeding in water versus air. The Atlantic mudskipper (Periophthalmus barbarus) is known to be proficient at feeding in the terrestrial environment and feeds predominately in this environment. Given the considerable forward flow of water observed during the mouth opening phase to assist with feeding on land, the mudskipper must alter the function of its feeding system to feed successfully in water...
October 7, 2016: Biology Open
Barbara Picone, Clint Rhode, Rouvay Roodt-Wilding
Aquatic animal diseases are one of the most important limitations to the growth of aquaculture. miRNAs represent an important class of small ncRNAs able to modulate host immune and stress responses. In Mollusca, a large phylum of invertebrates, miRNAs have been identified in several species. The current preliminary study identified known miRNAs from the South African abalone, Haliotis midae. The economic and ecological importance of abalone makes this species a suitable model for studying and understanding stress response in marine gastropods...
October 17, 2016: Marine Genomics
Alistair K Brown, Charles S Wong
Recent data suggests there are non-trivial amounts of human pharmaceutical conjugates potentially entering environmental surface waters. These compounds could contribute to eliciting toxic effects on aquatic biota either directly or indirectly, via de-conjugation. The need for developing a single method for quantifying both parents and conjugates is necessary. Propranolol (PRO), sulfamethoxazole (SMX), and their respective major conjugates 4-OH-propranolol sulfate (PRO-Sul) and sulfamethoxazole-β-glucuronide (SMX-Glc) were successfully simultaneously extracted through weak anion exchange solid phase extraction cartridges from primary and secondary clarification wastewaters from the North End Winnipeg Water Pollution Treatment Plant in Winnipeg, Canada...
October 11, 2016: Journal of Chromatography. A
Sandra A Heldstab, Carel P van Schaik, Karin Isler
Humans stand out among non-aquatic mammals by having both an extremely large brain and a relatively large amount of body fat. To understand the evolution of this human peculiarity we report a phylogenetic comparative study of 120 mammalian species, including 30 primates, using seasonal variation in adult body mass as a proxy of the tendency to store fat. Species that rely on storing fat to survive lean periods are expected to be less active because of higher costs of locomotion and have increased predation risk due to reduced agility...
November 2016: Journal of Human Evolution
Stephen J Jacquemin, Mark Pyron
BACKGROUND: Aquatic habitats have been altered over the past century due to a variety of anthropogenic influences. Ecomorphology is an area of aquatic ecology that can both directly and indirectly assess the effects of habitat alterations on organisms. However, few studies have explored long term trends in morphological variation. Long term changes in morphology can potentially impact niche and ultimately contribute to organismal success and the ecosystem. Therefore, in this study we assessed long term morphological variation with body size, sex, time, and hydrology using museum collections of five species of Cyprinidae (Minnows) from lentic and lotic systems over the past 100 years to gain insight into long term patterns in morphology...
October 20, 2016: BMC Ecology
Johanna M Kraus, Polly P Gibson, David M Walters, Marc A Mills
Riparian spiders are being used increasingly to track spatial patterns of contaminants in and fluxing from aquatic ecosystems. However, our understanding of the circumstances under which spiders are effective sentinels of aquatic pollution is limited. Here we test the hypothesis that riparian spiders may be effectively used to track spatial patterns of sediment pollution by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in aquatic ecosystems with high habitat heterogeneity. We found that spatial pattern of ΣPCB concentrations in two common families of riparian spiders sampled in 2011-2013 generally tracked spatial variation in sediment ΣPCBs across all sites within the Manistique River Great Lakes Area of Concern (AOC), a rivermouth ecosystem located on the south shore of the Upper Peninsula, Manistique, MI, that includes harbor, river, backwater, and lake habitats...
October 20, 2016: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
D Spasiano, A Siciliano, M Race, R Marotta, M Guida, R Andreozzi, F Pirozzi
Imidazole-based compounds are used as reagents for the manufacturing of other compounds including imidazolium-based ionic liquids, which have been recently proposed as a green alternative to conventional solvents. Since some imidazole-based compounds have been demonstrated to be harmful to aquatic organisms, the removal of imidazole, 1-methylimidazole, 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium chloride and 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium chloride from aqueous solutions was attempted by biological oxidation, direct UV254 photolysis, and UV254/H2O2 process at pH 5...
October 11, 2016: Water Research
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