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Wendy Glauser
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 19, 2018: CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal, Journal de L'Association Medicale Canadienne
Vicki Stover Hertzberg, Howard Weiss, Lisa Elon, Wenpei Si, Sharon L Norris
With over 3 billion airline passengers annually, the inflight transmission of infectious diseases is an important global health concern. Over a dozen cases of inflight transmission of serious infections have been documented, and air travel can serve as a conduit for the rapid spread of newly emerging infections and pandemics. Despite sensational media stories and anecdotes, the risks of transmission of respiratory viruses in an airplane cabin are unknown. Movements of passengers and crew may facilitate disease transmission...
March 19, 2018: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Elliot M Ross, Theodore T Redman
BACKGROUND: Noncompressible junctional and truncal hemorrhage remains a significant cause of combat casualty death. Resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) is an effective treatment for many junctional and noncompressible hemorrhages. The current hospital standard for time of placement of REBOA is approximately 6 minutes. This study examined the training process and the ability of nonsurgical physicians to apply REBOA therapy in an austere field environment. METHODS: This was a skill acquisition and feasibility study...
2018: Journal of Special Operations Medicine: a Peer Reviewed Journal for SOF Medical Professionals
Aaron Dentinger, Michael MacDonald, Douglas Ebert, Kathleen Garcia, Ashot Sargsyan
OBJECTIVE:  The objective is enhanced ophthalmic ultrasound imaging to monitor ocular structure and intracranial dynamics changes related to visual impairment and intracranial pressure (ICP) induced by microgravity. The goals are to improve the ease of use and reduce operator variability by automatically rendering improved views of the anatomy and deriving new metrics of the morphology and dynamics. MATERIALS AND METHODS:  A prototype three-dimensional (3-D) probe was integrated onto a portable ultrasound scanner...
2018: Acta Neurochirurgica. Supplement
Nitha N Naqvi, Victoria L Doughty, Luke Starling, Rodney C Franklin, Simon Ward, Piers E F Daubeney, Ian M Balfour-Lynn
OBJECTIVE: Commercial airplanes fly with an equivalent cabin fraction of inspired oxygen of 0.15, leading to reduced oxygen saturation (SpO2 ) in passengers. How this affects children with complex congenital heart disease (CHD) is unknown. We conducted Hypoxic Challenge Testing (HCT) to assess need for inflight supplemental oxygen. METHODS: Children aged <16 years had a standard HCT. They were grouped as (A) normal versus abnormal baseline SpO2 (≥95% vs <95%) and (B) absence versus presence of an actual/potential right-to-left (R-L) shunt...
February 14, 2018: Heart: Official Journal of the British Cardiac Society
Amanda Lamp, Jane M C Chen, David McCullough, Gregory Belenky
In December 2014, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) completed a major revision of the rules and regulations governing flight and duty time in commercial aviation (Federal Aviation Regulation (FAR) Part 117). Scientists were included in the revision process and provided insights into sleep, sleep loss, the circadian rhythm, and their effects on performance that were incorporated into the new rule. If a planned flight was non-compliant with the regulation, for example if it exceeded flight and duty time limits, it could only be flown under an FAA-approved Fatigue Risk Management System (FRMS) as meeting an Alternative Method of Compliance (AMOC)...
February 7, 2018: Accident; Analysis and Prevention
Hao Lei, Yuguo Li, Shenglan Xiao, Chao-Hsin Lin, Sharon L Norris, Daniel Wei, Zhongmin Hu, Shengcheng Ji
Identifying the exact transmission route(s) of infectious diseases in indoor environments is a crucial step in developing effective intervention strategies. In this study, we proposed a comparative analysis approach and built a model to simulate outbreaks of three different inflight infections in a similar cabin environment, i.e., influenza A H1N1, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (CoV), and norovirus. The simulation results seemed to suggest that the close contact route was probably the most significant route (contributes 70%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 67%-72%) in the inflight transmission of influenza A H1N1 transmission; as a result, passengers within two rows of the index case had a significantly higher infection risk than others in the outbreak (relative risk (RR): 13...
December 15, 2017: Indoor Air
Hao Lei, Yuguo Li, Shenglan Xiao, Xinyan Yang, ChaoHsin Lin, Sharon L Norris, Daniel Wei, Zhongmin Hu, Shengcheng Ji
Surfaces and objects surround us, and touching them is integral to everyday life. Pathogen contaminated surfaces (fomites) are known to transmit diseases. However, little is known about the ways and speed at which surfaces become contaminated. We found that under certain conditions, the number of contaminated surfaces grows logistically, corresponding to possible rapid transmission of infection. In such a surface network, pathogen can be transmitted great distances quickly-as far as people move. We found that the surface contamination network in aircraft cabins exhibits a community structure, with small communities connected by the aisle seatback surfaces and toilets, which are high-touch surfaces...
November 1, 2017: Scientific Reports
Joseph A Shaw
On the morning of 5 November 2013, a bright subsun was consistently visible during a flight from Bozeman, Montana, to Salt Lake City, Utah. Just after passing over the Wasatch Mountains and beginning to descend into the Salt Lake Valley, the subsun expanded to a rare display of Bottlinger's rings-an elliptical halo surrounding the subsun. The rings remained visible for 1 to 2 min. This paper shows photographs of the sequence, along with meteorological data from a nearby radiosonde. The display occurred in virga below clouds at an air temperature in the approximate range from -8°C to -12°C, in air saturated with respect to ice, at an altitude of approximately 2600-3600 m above mean sea level...
July 1, 2017: Applied Optics
Richard L Hughson, Sean D Peterson, Nicholas J Yee, Danielle K Greaves
Pulse contour analysis of the non-invasive finger arterial pressure waveform provides a convenient means to estimate cardiac output (Q ̇). The method has been compared to standard methods under a range of conditions but never before during spaceflight. We compared pulse contour analysis with the Modelflow algorithm to estimates of Q ̇ obtained by rebreathing during pre-flight baseline testing and during the final month of long-duration spaceflight in nine healthy male astronauts. By Modelflow analysis, stroke volume was greater in supine baseline than seated baseline or inflight...
August 10, 2017: Journal of Applied Physiology
Thomas Lang, Jack J W A Van Loon, Susan Bloomfield, Laurence Vico, Angele Chopard, Joern Rittweger, Antonios Kyparos, Dieter Blottner, Ilkka Vuori, Rupert Gerzer, Peter R Cavanagh
Without effective countermeasures, the musculoskeletal system is altered by the microgravity environment of long-duration spaceflight, resulting in atrophy of bone and muscle tissue, as well as in deficits in the function of cartilage, tendons, and vertebral disks. While inflight countermeasures implemented on the International Space Station have evidenced reduction of bone and muscle loss on low-Earth orbit missions of several months in length, important knowledge gaps must be addressed in order to develop effective strategies for managing human musculoskeletal health on exploration class missions well beyond Earth orbit...
2017: NPJ Microgravity
Kristopher T Starr
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 2017: Nursing
Zohar Lederman
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2017: Singapore Medical Journal
Johannes Kast, Yichao Yu, Christoph N Seubert, Virginia E Wotring, Hartmut Derendorf
Space agencies are working intensely to push the current boundaries of human spaceflight by sending astronauts deeper into space than ever before, including missions to Mars and asteroids. Spaceflight alters human physiology due to fluid shifts, muscle and bone loss, immune system dysregulation, and changes in the gastrointestinal tract and metabolic enzymes. These alterations may change the pharmacokinetics and/or pharmacodynamics of medications used by astronauts and subsequently might impact drug efficacy and safety...
November 15, 2017: European Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences
Helge Brändström, Anna Sundelin, Daniela Hoseason, Nina Sundström, Richard Birgander, Göran Johansson, Ola Winsö, Lars-Owe Koskinen, Michael Haney
BACKGROUND: Post-craniotomy intracranial air can be present in patients scheduled for air ambulance transport to their home hospital. We aimed to assess risk for in-flight intracranial pressure (ICP) increases related to observed intracranial air volumes, hypothetical sea level pre-transport ICP, and different potential flight levels and cabin pressures. METHODS: A cohort of consecutive subdural hematoma evacuation patients from one University Medical Centre was assessed with post-operative intracranial air volume measurements by computed tomography...
May 12, 2017: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
Jung Ha Kim, Smi Choi-Kwon, Young Hwan Park
Background: Since the number of air travellers, including the elderly and passengers with an underlying disease, is increasing every year, the number of inflight emergency patients is expected to increase as well. We attempted to identify the incidence and types of reported inflight medical incidents and analyse the first aid performed by cabin crew members or medical volunteers in flights by an Asian airline. We also investigated the cases of inflight deaths and aircraft diversions. Methods: We reviewed the cabin reports and medical records submitted by cabin crew members and inflight medical volunteers from 2009 to 2013...
March 1, 2017: Journal of Travel Medicine
Nora Petersen, Gunda Lambrecht, Jonathan Scott, Natalie Hirsch, Maria Stokes, Joachim Mester
BACKGROUND: Postflight reconditioning of astronauts is understudied. Despite a rigorous, daily inflight exercise countermeasures programme during six months in microgravity (μG) on-board the International Space Station (ISS), physiological impairments occur and postflight reconditioning is still required on return to Earth. Such postflight programmes are implemented by space agency reconditioning specialists. Case Description and Assessments: A 38 year old male European Space Agency (ESA) crewmember's pre- and postflight (at six and 21 days after landing) physical performance from a six-month mission to ISS are described...
January 2017: Musculoskeletal Science & Practice
Hiroko P Indo, Hideyuki J Majima, Masahiro Terada, Shigeaki Suenaga, Kazuo Tomita, Shin Yamada, Akira Higashibata, Noriaki Ishioka, Takuro Kanekura, Ikuya Nonaka, Clare L Hawkins, Michael J Davies, Daret K St Clair, Chiaki Mukai
The effects of long-term exposure to extreme space conditions on astronauts were investigated by analyzing hair samples from ten astronauts who had spent six months on the International Space Station (ISS). Two samples were collected before, during and after their stays in the ISS; hereafter, referred to as Preflight, Inflight and Postflight, respectively. The ratios of mitochondrial (mt) to nuclear (n) DNA and mtRNA to nRNA were analyzed via quantitative PCR. The combined data of Preflight, Inflight and Postflight show a significant reduction in the mtDNA/nDNA in Inflight, and significant reductions in the mtRNA/nRNA ratios in both the Inflight and Postflight samples...
December 16, 2016: Scientific Reports
Thomas H Mader, C Robert Gibson, Christian A Otto, Ashot E Sargsyan, Neil R Miller, Prem S Subramanian, Stephen F Hart, William Lipsky, Nimesh B Patel, Andrew G Lee
BACKGROUND: Several ophthalmic findings including optic disc swelling, globe flattening and choroidal folds have been observed in astronauts following long-duration space flight. The authors now report asymmetric choroidal expansion, disc swelling and optic disc morphologic changes in a 45-year-old astronaut which occurred during long-duration space flight and persisted following his space mission. METHODS: Case study of ocular findings in an astronaut documented during and after a long-duration space flight of approximately 6 months...
June 2017: Journal of Neuro-ophthalmology: the Official Journal of the North American Neuro-Ophthalmology Society
Ben D Lawson, Angus H Rupert, Braden J McGrath
Astronauts and vestibular patients face analogous challenges to orientation function due to adaptive exogenous (weightlessness-induced) or endogenous (pathology-induced) alterations in the processing of acceleration stimuli. Given some neurovestibular similarities between these challenges, both affected groups may benefit from shared research approaches and adaptation measurement/improvement strategies. This article reviews various past strategies and introduces two plausible ground-based approaches, the first of which is a method for eliciting and assessing vestibular adaptation-induced imbalance...
2016: Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience
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