Read by QxMD icon Read


Amy Y Tsou, Jonathan R Treadwell
BACKGROUND: Systematic review (SR) abstracts are important for disseminating evidence syntheses to inform medical decision making. We assess reporting quality in SR abstracts using PRISMA for Abstracts (PRISMA-A), Cochrane Handbook, and Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality guidance. METHODS: We evaluated a random sample of 200 SR abstracts (from 2014) comparing interventions in the general medical literature. We assessed adherence to PRISMA-A criteria, problematic wording in conclusions, and whether "positive" studies described clinical significance...
October 20, 2016: Research Synthesis Methods
Kelly N Jahn, Ryan A Stevenson, Mark T Wallace
OBJECTIVES: Despite significant improvements in speech perception abilities following cochlear implantation, many prelingually deafened cochlear implant (CI) recipients continue to rely heavily on visual information to develop speech and language. Increased reliance on visual cues for understanding spoken language could lead to the development of unique audiovisual integration and visual-only processing abilities in these individuals. Brain imaging studies have demonstrated that good CI performers, as indexed by auditory-only speech perception abilities, have different patterns of visual cortex activation in response to visual and auditory stimuli as compared with poor CI performers...
October 19, 2016: Ear and Hearing
Kaori Tamura, Takaaki Mizuba, Tsuyoshi Okamoto, Mayumi Matsufuji, Sachio Takashima, Keiji Iramina
INTRODUCTION: The level of residual cognitive function in patients with early brain injury is a key factor limiting rehabilitation and the quality of life. Although understanding residual function is necessary for appropriate rehabilitation, the extent of its effects on cognitive improvement remains unknown. The present study evaluated cognitive function in patients with severe motor and intellectual disabilities after early brain injuries due to cerebral hemorrhage (CH) or periventricular leukomalacia (PVL)...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology: Official Publication of the American Electroencephalographic Society
Sally P Weinrich, Jill E Bormann, Dale Glaser, Sally Hardin, Mary Barger, Cabiria Lizarraga, Juan Del Rio, Carolyn B Allard
Women and families are the fastest growing segment of the homeless population. Negative attitudes of nurses toward homeless women are a major barrier to homeless women seeking health care. This cross-sectional, mixed-methods pilot study, conducted primarily by nurses, tested the Mantram Repetition Program for the first time with 29 homeless women. The Mantram Repetition Program is a spiritually based skills training that teaches mantram (sacred word) repetition as a cost-effective, personalized, portable, and focused strategy for reducing stress and improving well-being...
November 2016: Holistic Nursing Practice
Stefanie M Chan, Tatyana F Svitova, Meng C Lin
Contact lens discomfort is a common problem that can lead to unsuccessful or limited contact lens wear. Although many factors may contribute to contact lens discomfort, limited research has explored the influence of ethnicity-related differences in the anatomy and physiology of the ocular surface. Therefore, we performed a search of the literature in PubMed using key words related to "ocular surface" paired with the terms "race" and "ethnicity." The goal of this review was to determine potential areas of research regarding ethnicity differences, particularly between Asian and non-Asian eyes, in ocular surface integrity to advance our understanding of contact lens discomfort...
October 19, 2016: Eye & Contact Lens
Shu Yang, Anne Rosenwald
Macroautophagy, a highly conserved process in eukaryotic cells, is initiated in response to stress, especially nutrient starvation. Macroautophagy helps cells survive by engulfing proteins and organelles into an unusual double-membraned structure called the autophagosome, which then fuses with the lysosome. Upon degradation of the engulfed contents, the building blocks are recycled for synthesis of new macromolecules. Recent work has demonstrated that construction of the autophagosome requires a variety of small GTPases in variations of their normal roles in membrane traffic...
October 20, 2016: Small GTPases
Ronald Schenk
Clinical work, as all of consciousness, is steeped in and emerges out of language. Language is the medium of our knowing, and knowing the medium of our relating. Language has us; words dream us. For the mythical Navajo as for John of the New Testament, in the Beginning was the Word. Before any kind of distinction of thought, feeling, sensation or intuition comes language - language, not as 'just words', but as image. Words are images, and images as encompassing worlds present themselves as and through language...
November 2016: Journal of Analytical Psychology
Patricia Brown
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 20, 2016: Lab Animal
Helena Rosenblatt
Rosenblatt questions whether Pocock's Barbarism and Religion, though enormously learned and rich, in fact accomplishes Pocock's stated aims. In other words, does the context presented help to explain the intended meaning and significance of Gibbon's Decline and Fall? She asks whether Pocock's methodology, indebted to the Cambridge School, is consistent and serviceable and challenges his claim that Gibbon should be seen as a member of the "Protestant Enlightenment."
2016: Journal of the History of Ideas
Wei Chen, Jian-Ming Guo, Jun Hou, Guo-Min Wang
PURPOSE: Saving warm ischaemia time (WIT) in laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) is very important. We have designed a new device, a remotely activated bulldog clamp, to facilitate LPN. In present study, the effectiveness, convenience and safety of the new design device were compared with that of standard bulldog vascular clamp in a pig model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifteen cases of LPN were bilaterally operated on upper or lower pole of kidneys in five pigs...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Endourology
Markus Ostarek, Gabriella Vigliocco
Previous research has shown that processing words with an up/down association (e.g., bird, foot) can influence the subsequent identification of visual targets in congruent location (at the top/bottom of the screen). However, as facilitation and interference were found under similar conditions, the nature of the underlying mechanisms remained unclear. We propose that word comprehension relies on the perceptual simulation of a prototypical event involving the entity denoted by a word in order to provide a general account of the different findings...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory, and Cognition
Hillary Anger Elfenbein, Daisung Jang, Sudeep Sharma, Jeffrey Sanchez-Burks
Emotional intelligence (EI) has captivated researchers and the public alike, but it has been challenging to establish its components as objective abilities. Self-report scales lack divergent validity from personality traits, and few ability tests have objectively correct answers. We adapt the Stroop task to introduce a new facet of EI called emotional attention regulation (EAR), which involves focusing emotion-related attention for the sake of information processing rather than for the sake of regulating one's own internal state...
October 20, 2016: Emotion
Elena Dukhovny, YanYan Zhou
Increasing speed and accuracy of communication via a speech-generating device (SGD) is an important clinical goal in augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). The current study, conducted with adults without disabilities using a within-subject experimental design, compared the effects of two different SGD trainings on speed and accuracy of locating words via an SGD interface. During size-centered training, participants were introduced to six large icons that completely filled an SGD screen. During location-centered training, participants were introduced to six small icons on a 40-location screen where other icons were hidden...
October 20, 2016: Augmentative and Alternative Communication: AAC
Walter H Moos, Carl A Pinkert, Michael H Irwin, Douglas V Faller, Krishna Kodukula, Ioannis P Glavas, Kosta Steliou
Preclinical Research Approximately 2,500 years ago, Hippocrates used the word herpes as a medical term to describe lesions that appeared to creep or crawl on the skin, advocating heat as a possible treatment. During the last 50 years, pharmaceutical research has made great strides, and therapeutic options have expanded to include small molecule antiviral agents, protease inhibitors, preventive vaccines for a handful of the papillomaviruses, and even cures for hepatitis C virus infections. However, effective treatments for persistent and recurrent viral infections, particularly the highly prevalent herpesviruses, continue to represent a significant unmet medical need, affecting the majority of the world's population...
October 20, 2016: Drug Development Research
Alfred Lorenzer
Freud held that the repressed unconscious arose from the separation of thing-presentations from word-presentations. The author divests these terms of the implication that they are objectively existing entities by citing some of Freud's other texts. Thing-presentations are memory-traces of (as yet) non-language-based interactions - that is, precipitates of actions that have been experienced and models of future actions. Scenic understanding, which, on the basis of participation by the therapist in the patient's play, treats all material presented by the patient by an approach analogous to the interpretation of dreams, is therefore the royal road to the unconscious...
October 2016: International Journal of Psycho-analysis
Zahra Polat, Erdoğan Bulut, Ahmet Ataş
BACKGROUND: Spoken word recognition and speech perception tests in quiet are being used as a routine in assessment of the benefit which children and adult cochlear implant users receive from their devices. Cochlear implant users generally demonstrate high level performances in these test materials as they are able to achieve high level speech perception ability in quiet situations. Although these test materials provide valuable information regarding Cochlear Implant (CI) users' performances in optimal listening conditions, they do not give realistic information regarding performances in adverse listening conditions, which is the case in the everyday environment...
September 2016: Balkan Medical Journal
Angela Meadows, Sigrún Daníelsdóttir
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
Kesaban S Roychoudhuri, Seema G Prasad, Ramesh K Mishra
We examined if iconic pictures belonging to one's native culture interfere with second language production in bilinguals in an object naming task. Bengali-English bilinguals named pictures in both L1 and L2 against iconic cultural images representing Bengali culture or neutral images. Participants named in both "Blocked" and "Mixed" language conditions. In both conditions, participants were significantly slower in naming in English when the background was an iconic Bengali culture picture than a neutral image...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
Rebecca Treiman, Brett Kessler, Tatiana Cury Pollo, Brian Byrne, Richard K Olson
Learning the orthographic forms of words is important for both spelling and reading. To determine whether some methods of scoring children's early spellings predict later spelling performance better than do other methods, we analyzed data from 374 U.S. and Australian children who took a 10-word spelling test at the end of kindergarten (mean age 6 years, 2 months) and a standardized spelling test approximately two years later. Surprisingly, scoring methods that took account of phonological plausibility did not outperform methods that were based only on orthographic correctness...
2016: Scientific Studies of Reading: the Official Journal of the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading
Mark R Raymond, Yu Ling, Irina Grabovsky
This study evaluated the extent to which medical students with limited English-language experience are differentially impacted by the additional reading load of test items consisting of long clinical vignettes. Participants included 25,012 examinees who completed Step 2 of the U.S. Medical Licensing Examination®. Test items were categorized into five levels based on the number of words per item, and examinee scores at each level were evaluated as a function of English-language experience (English as a second language [ESL] status and scores on a test of English-speaking proficiency)...
October 19, 2016: Evaluation & the Health Professions
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"