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Abukari I Issaka, Kingsley E Agho, Andre M N Renzaho
OBJECTIVE: The literature on the impact of internal migration on under-five mortality in sub-Saharan Africa has been limited. This study examined the impact of internal migration on under-five mortality rate in 27 sub-Saharan African countries. DESIGN: The analysis used cross-sectional data from the most recent Demographic and Health Surveys of 27 sub-Saharan African countries. Information on the number of live births and the number of under-five deaths in the five years preceding the surveys in these countries was examined...
2016: PloS One
Sarah E Baum, Kari White, Kristine Hopkins, Joseph E Potter, Daniel Grossman
BACKGROUND: In November 2013, Texas implemented three abortion restrictions included in House Bill 2 (HB 2). Within six months, the number of facilities providing abortion decreased by almost half, and the remaining facilities were concentrated in large urban centers. The number of medication abortions decreased by 70% compared to the same period one year prior due to restrictions on this method imposed by HB 2. The purpose of this study was to explore qualitatively the experiences of women who were most affected by the law: those who had to travel farther to reach a facility and those desiring medication abortion...
2016: PloS One
Kathrine Lynn Barnes, Casper G Bendixsen
Farmers are growing older, and fewer new agriculturists are rising to take their place. Concurrently, women and minorities are entering agriculture at an increasing rate. These rates are particularly curious viewed in light of the racialized and gendered nature of agriculture. Slavery and agriculture share strong historical roots with many male slaves performing agricultural labor. So then, why would African American women choose to engage in agriculture in any form? Participant-observation and in-depth interviews with a group of African American women urban farmers in the southeastern United States were asked this question...
October 26, 2016: Journal of Agromedicine
Eugene T Richardson, Mohamed Bailor Barrie, J Daniel Kelly, Yusupha Dibba, Songor Koedoyoma, Paul E Farmer
Despite more than 25 documented outbreaks of Ebola since 1976, our understanding of the disease is limited, in particular the social, political, ecological, and economic forces that promote (or limit) its spread. In the following study, we seek to provide new ways of understanding the 2013-2016 Ebola pandemic. We use the term, 'pandemic,' instead of 'epidemic,' so as not to elide the global forces that shape every localized outbreak of infectious disease. By situating life histories via a biosocial approach, the forces promoting or retarding Ebola transmission come into sharper focus...
June 2016: Health and Human Rights
Saturnin Bertrand Nguenda Anya, Atanase Yene
This paper seeks to identify the determinants of the choice of treatment of pregnant women in Cameroon. Theoretically, the methodology is based on a discrete choice model with random utility. Empirically, the econometric specification is a Nested Multinomial Logit Model. The data used comes from the Demographic Health Survey (DHS) organized in 2011 by the National Institute of Statistics. The results reveal that uneducated women or those having only a primary education prefer to meet the traditional midwives than seek modern maternal health services...
December 2016: Health Economics Review
Tyra Bryant-Stephens, Shakira Reed-Wells, Maryori Canales, Luzmercy Perez, A Russell Localio, Andrea J Apter
Research on asthma frequently recruits patients from clinics because the ready pool of patients leads to easy access to patients in office waiting areas, emergency departments, or hospital wards. Patients with other chronic conditions, and with mobility problems, face exposures at home that are not easily identified at the clinic. In this paper we describe the perspective of the community health workers and challenges they encountered when making home visits while implementing a research intervention in a cohort of low-income, minority patients...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Pasquale E Rummo, Jana A Hirsch, Annie Green Howard, Penny Gordon-Larsen
OBJECTIVES: We sought to examine characteristics of neighborhoods with changing older adult populations. METHODS: We used 30 years (1980-2011) of data from four U.S. cities (n=392 neighborhoods; Birmingham, AL; Chicago, IL; Minneapolis, MN; Oakland, CA) and finite mixture modeling to identify trajectory classes: neighborhoods with "stable", declining, or increasing older adult populations (≥65 years). We then compared mean baseline and change in their characteristics...
January 2016: Gerontology & Geriatric Medicine
Roland J Jr Thorpe, Eleanor Simonsick, Alan Zonderman, Michelle K Evans
BACKGROUND: Poor grip strength is an indicator of frailty and a precursor to functional limitations. Although poor grip strength is more prevalent in older disabled African American women, little is known about the association between race and poverty-related disparities and grip strength in middle-aged men and women. METHODS: We examined the cross-sectional relationship between race, socioeconomic status as assessed by household income, and hand grip strength in men and women in the Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity across the Life Span study...
October 20, 2016: Ethnicity & Disease
Luisa N Borrell, Lisa Graham, Sharon P Joseph
OBJECTIVES: To examine the association of neighborhood safety and support with overweight and obesity and whether these associations vary with age, sex, and race/ethnicity among children and adolescents. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. SETTING: United States. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Childhood overweight and obesity. METHODS: We used data from the 2011-12 National Survey of Children's Health, a representative sample of US children and adolescents, for the analyses (N=40,730)...
October 20, 2016: Ethnicity & Disease
Katie A McLaughlin, Margaret A Sheridan
Children who have experienced environmental adversity-such as abuse, neglect, or poverty-are more likely to develop physical and mental health problems, perform poorly at school, and have difficulties in social relationships than children who have not encountered adversity. What is less clear is how and why adverse early experiences exert such a profound influence on children's development. Identifying developmental processes that are disrupted by adverse early environments is the key to developing better intervention strategies for children who have experienced adversity...
August 2016: Current Directions in Psychological Science
Tyler W Myroniuk
Social capital research rarely takes a gendered approach. This article explores how black women and men from a marginalized community in Johannesburg, South Africa, rely on family, friends, and community members to survive and strategize for the future by utilizing social capital. The results from 30 semi-structured interviews and ego network mapping illustrate that gender moderates the type of social capital used and benefits associated with bonding and bridging social capital in important ways. This research builds upon knowledge of gendered advantages and disadvantages in social networks and informs researchers how women and men survive in pervasive poverty...
2016: Sociological Focus
Andrés F Henao-Martínez, Kathryn Colborn, Gabriel Parra-Henao
Chagas disease is a complex tropical parasitic infection. It affects a significant portion of the population in Latin America, especially in areas of poverty and poor access to health care. It also affects immigrants in high-income countries who lack access to health care due to their legal status. Millions of people are at risk of contracting the disease, and approximately 30 % of chronically infected patients will develop cardiomyopathy. The cost of caring for patients that have been infected is substantial...
October 22, 2016: Parasitology Research
Casey M Rebholz, Adrienne Tin, Yang Liu, Marie Fanelli Kuczmarski, Michele K Evans, Alan B Zonderman, Deidra C Crews
BACKGROUND: Prior studies suggest that certain aspects of the diet related to magnesium intake, such as dietary acid load, protein intake and dietary patterns rich in fruits and vegetables, may impact kidney disease risk. We hypothesized that lower dietary magnesium intake would be prospectively associated with more rapid kidney function decline. METHODS: Among participants in the Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity across the Life Span study with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥60 ml/min/1...
October 22, 2016: American Journal of Nephrology
M Graff, A S Richardson, K L Young, A L Mazul, Heather Highland, K E North, K L Mohlke, L A Lange, E M Lange, K M Harris, P Gordon-Larsen
Little is known about how obesity susceptibility single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) interact with moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in relation to BMI during adolescence, once obesogenic neighborhood factors are accounted for. In race stratified models, including European (EA; N=4977), African (AA; N=1726), and Hispanic Americans (HA; N=1270) from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (1996; ages 12-21), we assessed the evidence for a SNPxMVPA interaction with BMI-for-age Z score, once accounting for obesogenic neighborhood factors including physical activity amenities, transportation and recreation infrastructure, poverty and crime...
October 20, 2016: Health & Place
M A Beydoun, H A Beydoun, N Mode, G A Dore, J A Canas, S M Eid, A B Zonderman
BACKGROUND: Studies uncovering factors beyond socio-economic status (SES) that would explain racial and ethnic disparities in mortality are scarce. METHODS: Using prospective cohort data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III), we examined all-cause and cause-specific mortality disparities by race, mediation through key factors and moderation by age (20-49 vs. 50+), sex and poverty status. Cox proportional hazards, discrete-time hazards and competing risk regression models were conducted (N = 16,573 participants, n = 4207 deaths, Median time = 170 months (1-217 months))...
October 22, 2016: BMC Public Health
Stéphane Verguet, Solomon Tessema Memirie, Ole Frithjof Norheim
BACKGROUND: Out-of-pocket (OOP) medical expenses often lead to catastrophic expenditure and impoverishment in low- and middle-income countries. Yet, there has been no systematic examination of which specific diseases and conditions (e.g., tuberculosis, cardiovascular disease) drive medical impoverishment, defined as OOP direct medical costs pushing households into poverty. METHODS: We used a cost and epidemiological model to propose an assessment of the burden of medical impoverishment in Ethiopia, i...
October 21, 2016: BMC Medicine
Rui Wang, Yan Dong, Jia Weng, Emily Z Kontos, Ronald D Chervin, Carol L Rosen, Carole L Marcus, Susan Redline
RATIONALE: Prior research found that individual-level environmental and social indicators did not explain the racial disparity in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Neighborhood socioeconomic variables, risk factors for a range of adverse behavioral and health outcomes, may better explain this racial disparity and help identify modifiable intervention targets. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the associations of neighborhood socioeconomic variables with obstructive sleep apnea severity and to assess whether the neighborhood variables explain the association between race and obstructive sleep apnea severity...
October 21, 2016: Annals of the American Thoracic Society
Gavin Tansley, Barclay T Stewart, Adam Gyedu, Godfred Boakye, Daniel Lewis, Marius Hoogerboord, Charles Mock
BACKGROUND: Surgical disease burden falls disproportionately on individuals in low- and middle-income countries. These populations are also the least likely to have access to surgical care. Understanding the barriers to access in these populations is therefore necessary to meet the global surgical need. METHODS: Using geospatial methods, this study explores the district-level variation of two access barriers in Ghana: poverty and spatial access to care. National survey data were used to estimate the average total household expenditure (THE) in each district...
October 20, 2016: World Journal of Surgery
Maria P Rebollo, Moses J Bockarie
Interventions against neglected tropical diseases (NTD), including lymphatic filariasis (LF), scaled up dramatically after the signing of the London Declaration (LD) in 2012. LF is targeted for elimination by 2020, but some countries are considered not on track to meet the 2020 target using the recommended preventive chemotherapy and morbidity management strategies. In this Opinion article we review the prospects for achieving LF elimination by 2020 in the light of the renewed global action against NTDs and the global efforts to achieve the sustainable development goals (SDGs) by 2030...
October 17, 2016: Trends in Parasitology
Sabine Iva Franklin
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 20, 2016: Medicine, Conflict, and Survival
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