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Drosophila memory

Annekathrin Widmann, Marc Artinger, Lukas Biesinger, Kathrin Boepple, Christina Peters, Jana Schlechter, Mareike Selcho, Andreas S Thum
Memory formation is a highly complex and dynamic process. It consists of different phases, which depend on various neuronal and molecular mechanisms. In adult Drosophila it was shown that memory formation after aversive Pavlovian conditioning includes-besides other forms-a labile short-term component that consolidates within hours to a longer-lasting memory. Accordingly, memory formation requires the timely controlled action of different neuronal circuits, neurotransmitters, neuromodulators and molecules that were initially identified by classical forward genetic approaches...
October 2016: PLoS Genetics
Shelby A Montague, Bruce S Baker
An animal's ability to learn and to form memories is essential for its survival. The fruit fly has proven to be a valuable model system for studies of learning and memory. One learned behavior in fruit flies is courtship conditioning. In Drosophila courtship conditioning, male flies learn not to court females during training with an unreceptive female. He retains a memory of this training and for several hours decreases courtship when subsequently paired with any female. Courtship conditioning is a unique learning paradigm; it uses a positive-valence stimulus, a female fly, to teach a male to decrease an innate behavior, courtship of the female...
2016: PloS One
John G Conboy
The Rbfox genes encode an ancient family of sequence-specific RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that are critical developmental regulators in multiple tissues including skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle, and brain. The hallmark of Rbfox proteins is a single high-affinity RRM domain, highly conserved from insects to humans, that binds preferentially to UGCAUG motifs at diverse regulatory sites in pre-mRNA introns, mRNA 3'UTRs, and pre-miRNAs hairpin structures. Versatile regulatory circuits operate on Rbfox pre-mRNA and mRNA to ensure proper expression of Rbfox1 protein isoforms, which then act on the broader transcriptome to regulate alternative splicing networks, mRNA stability and translation, and microRNA processing...
October 17, 2016: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews. RNA
Toshiharu Ichinose, Hiromu Tanimoto
Memory retrieval requires both accuracy and speed. Olfactory learning of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster serves as a powerful model system to identify molecular and neuronal substrates of memory and memory-guided behavior. The behavioral expression of olfactory memory has traditionally been tested as a conditioned odor response in a simple T-maze, which measures the result, but not the speed, of odor choice. Here, we developed multiplexed T-mazes that allow video recording of the choice behavior. Automatic fly counting in each arm of the maze visualizes choice dynamics...
2016: Proceedings of the Japan Academy. Series B, Physical and Biological Sciences
Carlos Montemuiño, Antonio Espinosa, Juan C Moure, Gonzalo Vera, Porfidio Hernández, Sebastián Ramos-Onsins
The msParSm application is an evolution of msPar, the parallel version of the coalescent simulation program ms, which removes the limitation for simulating long stretches of DNA sequences with large recombination rates, without compromising the accuracy of the standard coalescence. This work introduces msParSm, describes its significant performance improvements over msPar and its shared memory parallelization details, and shows how it can get better, if not similar, execution times than MaCS. Two case studies with different mutation rates were analyzed, one approximating the human average and the other approximating the Drosophila melanogaster average...
2016: Evolutionary Bioinformatics Online
Satoru Wakabayashi, Naoya Sawamura, André Voelzmann, Meike Broemer, Toru Asahi, Michael Hoch
Cereblon (CRBN) is a substrate receptor of the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex that is highly conserved in animals and plants. CRBN proteins have been implicated in various biological processes such as development, metabolism, learning and memory formation and their impairment has been linked to autosomal recessive non-syndromic intellectual disability and cancer. Furthermore, human CRBN was identified as the primary target of thalidomide teratogenicity. Data on functional analysis of CRBN family members in vivo is, however, still scarce...
October 4, 2016: Journal of Biological Chemistry
Varun K Gupta, Ulrike Pech, Anuradha Bhukel, Andreas Fulterer, Anatoli Ender, Stephan F Mauermann, Till F M Andlauer, Emmanuel Antwi-Adjei, Christine Beuschel, Kerstin Thriene, Marta Maglione, Christine Quentin, René Bushow, Martin Schwärzel, Thorsten Mielke, Frank Madeo, Joern Dengjel, André Fiala, Stephan J Sigrist
Memories are assumed to be formed by sets of synapses changing their structural or functional performance. The efficacy of forming new memories declines with advancing age, but the synaptic changes underlying age-induced memory impairment remain poorly understood. Recently, we found spermidine feeding to specifically suppress age-dependent impairments in forming olfactory memories, providing a mean to search for synaptic changes involved in age-dependent memory impairment. Here, we show that a specific synaptic compartment, the presynaptic active zone (AZ), increases the size of its ultrastructural elaboration and releases significantly more synaptic vesicles with advancing age...
September 2016: PLoS Biology
Peter Klepsatel, Martina Gáliková, Yanjun Xu, Ronald P Kühnlein
Understanding how environmental temperature affects metabolic and physiological functions is of crucial importance to assess the impacts of climate change on organisms. Here, we used different laboratory strains and a wild-caught population of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to examine the effect of temperature on the body energy reserves of an ectothermic organism. We found that permanent ambient temperature elevation or transient thermal stress causes significant depletion of body fat stores. Surprisingly, transient thermal stress induces a lasting "memory effect" on body fat storage, which also reduces survivorship of the flies upon food deprivation later after stress exposure...
2016: Scientific Reports
Oriane Turrel, Aurélie Lampin-Saint-Amaux, Thomas Préat, Valérie Goguel
UNLABELLED: Neprilysins are type II metalloproteinases known to degrade and inactivate a number of small peptides. Neprilysins in particular are the major amyloid-β peptide-degrading enzymes. In mouse models of Alzheimer's disease, neprilysin overexpression improves learning and memory deficits, whereas neprilysin deficiency aggravates the behavioral phenotypes. However, whether these enzymes are involved in memory in nonpathological conditions is an open question. Drosophila melanogaster is a well suited model system with which to address this issue...
September 14, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
Yan Kong, Ke Li, Tingting Fu, Chao Wan, Dongdong Zhang, Hang Song, Yao Zhang, Na Liu, Zhenji Gan, Liudi Yuan
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a prevalent neurodegenerative disorder characterized by β amyloid (Aβ) deposition and neurofibril tangles. It has been reported that a bioflavonoid, quercetin, could ameliorate AD phenotypes in C. elegans and mice. However, the mechanism underlying the ameliorative effect of quercetin is not fully understood yet. Drosophila models could recapitulate AD-like phenotypes, such as shortened lifespan, impaired locomotive ability as well as defects in learning and memory. So in this study, we investigated the effects of quercetin on AD in Drosophila model and explored the underlying mechanisms...
September 10, 2016: Oncotarget
S V Satya Prakash Avva, Craig M Hart
Data implicate the Drosophila 32 kDa Boundary Element-Associated Factors BEAF-32A and BEAF-32B in both chromatin domain insulator element function and promoter function. They might also function as an epigenetic memory by remaining bound to mitotic chromosomes. Both proteins are made from the same gene. They differ in their N-terminal 80 amino acids, which contain single DNA-binding BED fingers. The remaining 200 amino acids are identical in the two proteins. The structure and function of the middle region of 120 amino acids is unknown, while the C-terminal region of 80 amino acids has a putative leucine zipper and a BESS domain and mediates BEAF-BEAF interactions...
2016: PloS One
Mohammad Haddadi, Samaneh Reiszadeh Jahromi, Upendra Nongthomba, T Shivanandappa, S R Ramesh
Oxidative stress is one of the major etiological factors implicated in pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Since neurons are more sensitive to oxidative damage there is an increasing interest in developing novel antioxidant therapies, especially herbal preparations due to their safety profile and high efficiency. In this regard, the neuroprotective potential of a novel antioxidant compound, 4-hydroxyisophthalic acid (4-HIPA) isolated from aqueous extract of Decalepis hamiltonii roots was examined using transgenic Drosophila model of taupathy expressing wild-type and mutant forms of 2N4R isoform of human microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT)...
September 9, 2016: Neurochemistry International
Indrikis Krams, Sarah Eichler Inwood, Giedrius Trakimas, Ronalds Krams, Gordon M Burghardt, David M Butler, Severi Luoto, Tatjana Krama
Factors such as temperature, habitat, larval density, food availability and food quality substantially affect organismal development. In addition, risk of predation has a complex impact on the behavioural and morphological life history responses of prey. Responses to predation risk seem to be mediated by physiological stress, which is an adaptation for maintaining homeostasis and improving survivorship during life-threatening situations. We tested whether predator exposure during the larval phase of development has any influence on body elemental composition, energy reserves, body size, climbing speed and survival ability of adult Drosophila melanogaster...
2016: PeerJ
Yunlong Liu, Shuwen Du, Li Lv, Bo Lei, Wei Shi, Yikai Tang, Lianzhang Wang, Yi Zhong
Forgetting is a universal feature for most types of memories. The best-defined and extensively characterized behaviors that depict forgetting are natural memory decay and interference-based forgetting [1, 2]. Molecular mechanisms underlying the active forgetting remain to be determined for memories in vertebrates. Recent progress has begun to unravel such mechanisms underlying the active forgetting [3-11] that is induced through the behavior-dependent activation of intracellular signaling pathways. In Drosophila, training-induced activation of the small G protein Rac1 mediates natural memory decay and interference-based forgetting of aversive conditioning memory [3]...
September 12, 2016: Current Biology: CB
Chun-Chieh Lin, Olena Riabinina, Christopher J Potter
A key challenge in neurobiology is to understand how neural circuits function to guide appropriate animal behaviors. Drosophila melanogaster is an excellent model system for such investigations due to its complex behaviors, powerful genetic techniques, and compact nervous system. Laboratory behavioral assays have long been used with Drosophila to simulate properties of the natural environment and study the neural mechanisms underlying the corresponding behaviors (e.g. phototaxis, chemotaxis, sensory learning and memory)(1-3)...
2016: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
Ilaria Drago, Ronald L Davis
The uptake of cytoplasmic calcium into mitochondria is critical for a variety of physiological processes, including calcium buffering, metabolism, and cell survival. Here, we demonstrate that inhibiting the mitochondrial calcium uniporter in the Drosophila mushroom body neurons (MBn)-a brain region critical for olfactory memory formation-causes memory impairment without altering the capacity to learn. Inhibiting uniporter activity only during pupation impaired adult memory, whereas the same inhibition during adulthood was without effect...
September 6, 2016: Cell Reports
Maria Derkacheva, Shujing Liu, Duarte D Figueiredo, Matthew Gentry, Iva Mozgova, Paolo Nanni, Min Tang, Mattias Mannervik, Claudia Köhler, Lars Hennig
Polycomb group (PcG) proteins form an epigenetic memory system in plants and animals, but interacting proteins are poorly known in plants. Here, we have identified Arabidopsis UBIQUITIN SPECIFIC PROTEASES (USP; UBP in plant and yeasts) 12 and 13 as partners of the plant-specific PcG protein LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN 1 (LHP1). UBP12 binds to chromatin of PcG target genes and is required for histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation and repression of a subset of PcG target genes. Plants lacking UBP12 and UBP13 developed autonomous endosperm in the absence of fertilization...
2016: Nature Plants
Helen Poska, Martin Haslbeck, Firoz Roshan Kurudenkandy, Erik Hermansson, Gefei Chen, George Kostallas, Axel Abelein, Henrik Biverstål, Sophie Crux, André Fisahn, Jenny Presto, Jan Johansson
Formation of fibrils of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) is suggested to play a central role in neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD), for which no effective treatment exists. The BRICHOS domain is a part of several disease-related proproteins, the most studied ones being Bri2 associated with familial dementia and prosurfactant protein C (proSP-C) associated with lung amyloid. BRICHOS from proSP-C has been found to be an efficient inhibitor of Aβ aggregation and toxicity, but its lung-specific expression makes it unsuited to target in AD...
October 15, 2016: Biochemical Journal
Marlène Cassar, Doris Kretzschmar
The Amyloid precursor protein (APP) has mainly been investigated in connection with its role in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) due to its cleavage resulting in the production of the Aβ peptides that accumulate in the plaques characteristic for this disease. However, APP is an evolutionary conserved protein that is not only found in humans but also in many other species, including Drosophila, suggesting an important physiological function. Besides Aβ, several other fragments are produced by the cleavage of APP; large secreted fragments derived from the N-terminus and a small intracellular C-terminal fragment...
2016: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
Simon Restrepo, Konrad Basler
Calcium signalling is a highly versatile cellular communication system that modulates basic functions such as cell contractility, essential steps of animal development such as fertilization and higher-order processes such as memory. We probed the function of calcium signalling in Drosophila wing imaginal discs through a combination of ex vivo and in vivo imaging and genetic analysis. Here we discover that wing discs display slow, long-range intercellular calcium waves (ICWs) when mechanically stressed in vivo or cultured ex vivo...
2016: Nature Communications
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